Elections

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Question 3 - we asked:

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

We asked this question in all 17 wards, namely: Abbey, Arbury, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, Cottenham, East Chesterton, Girton, Histon & Impington, King's Hedges, Market, Newnham, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Romsey, Trumpington, West Chesterton.

42 of the 87 candidates (48%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I certainly agree that many such streets should not be taken at speeds exceeding 20mph and I am open to the possibility that that should be mandated by speed limits or a home zone. However, I would be wary of a solution that required a sea of street furniture in residential roads. I would disagree with using safety measures to implement social engineering; for example, specifically making driving frustrating in order to encourage walking and cycling. Safety measures need to have the respect of road users so they must only be enacted for safety reasons.

Thomas Dominic BYGOTT
(Conservative Party)

In Girton’s case, there are two main roads through the village, and the distinction between main roads and minor streets is clear. I would be interested to see the details of a general scheme for 20mph in local streets and 30mph on through roads. However, it would be important that such a scheme doesn't lead to confusion about what the limit on a particular stretch is, and doesn't lead to an increase in the number of signs. There are too many signs cluttering up our villages and detracting from their rural character.

Joshua William Shubra HORDERN
(Conservative Party)

While I agree that many Cambridge streets should only be used by motorists at 20mph I would not agree that this should be a blanket policy. One of the possible risks of such a policy would be to create antagonism between car-users and cyclists. Better awareness of cyclists by motorists and more responsible cycling would be a major contribution to safety on our streets.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

I don't believe in blanket speed limits that are unsubstantiated by evidence and which are not the subject of consultation, however I absolutely agree that we need 20mph speed limits in some residential streets, areas of intense pedestrian activity and outside schools and playgrounds. I also think we need to be more creative about how we enforce compliance with speed limits through education and "smart" signals. I am concerned about the proliferation of speed limitation devices such as road narrowing and speed cushions that result in large variations in speed along busy roads, restrict the progress of emergency vehicles and represent a road safety hazard in themselves for cyclists and motor cyclists.

James Michael KENNEDY
(Green Party)

Several Cambridge streets have campaigned for a 20mph limit successfully. Oxford Road near my house in Castle Ward achieved this last year.

I will push for a 20mph speed limit right across the City's residential areas. I am pleased to say that local Green councillors have been successful in achieving this in Norwich.

The City Council's proposed "20mph City" plan does not extend far enough. The 20mph boundary should be extended to include all residential areas of Castle Ward.

Stephen Roger LAWRENCE
(Green Party)

20ph - agreed. Needs to include something to satisfy car-users - ie they will actually have to learn how to drive at 20mph. It's not easy. Perhaps get the radio station involved in a test to see how (little) this might affect end-to-end car journey times.

Heather Anne MACBETH-HORNETT
(Green Party)

There is a very short 20mph zone around Cottenham Primary School, but I would love to see a 20mph limit extended throughout the village. There is inadequate pedestrian crossing provision throughout Cottenham, a very long village, and it would make sense to have a 20mph limit around the High Street near the Village College as soon as possible. It is very sad that children have to travel by bus from Rampton to Cottenham schools because the cycle and pedestrian paths have been deemed unsafe.

Shayne MITCHELL
(Green Party)

Yes. I would also support a 20mph limit on main connecting roads in the town, which currently are intimidating, noisy + unpleasant, + divide communities.

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

The introduction of a 20mph speed limit for residential streets will bring a number of benefits for the community, including increased safety for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and reduced fuel and carbon dioxide emissions.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

The introduction of a 20mph speed limit for residential streets will bring a number of benefits for the community, including increased safety for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and reduced fuel and carbon dioxide emissions.

Adam POGONOWSKI
(Green Party)

Absolutely, and this is Green Party policy nationally too. It is certainly something I will argue for, as it also fosters better community relations and interaction.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Twenty's Plenty, I agree. I believe that it will help to change attitudes to speed and eventually to develop social pressures that will even contain the lunatic fringe. (A recent police survey clocked one motorist in North Cambridge at 68mph).

Teal RILEY
(Green Party)

Girton has already been earmarked as a test site for a 20mph limit. I would be in favour but I fail to see how it could work in practice. We currently have an advisory 20 mph limit at school drop off/collection times. Motorists are warned by flashing orange lights. But there is no procedure in place to enforce this limit. It is largely enforced by the volume of traffic and parked cars slowing the through traffic.
What I would like to see removed are the current island speed humps in the village which just encourage motorists to cut back into the path of cyclists so their cars can straddle the humps.
So in short, 20 - yes please. But it won't enforce itself. Particularly in Girton where there is a long straight main road and cars regularly do in excess of 40 mph anyway.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I really like this idea in residential areas, and i have heard it being discussed in various social groups of mine for the last few years. A 20mph speed limit would level the playing field between car users, pedestrians and cyclists, as the journey time to get from one bit of a residential area to another would be similar for all modes of transport. And the difference between being hit by a car at 20mph and 30mph is surely significant, with the victim being hit at 20mph having a greater chance of recovery than the 30mph one. I'm with you on this one!

Brian WESTCOTT
(Green Party)

This is already Green Party policy and I believe has been implemented in both Brighton and Norwich where there are many more Green councillors than in Cambridge. I would fight to get this passed in Cambridge, if elected.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

I do think we should be pushing to see 20MPH speed limits for residential streets across the city and 20MPH for the entirety of the city centre and those busy roads most used by cyclists.
20MPH puts cyclists and other road users at a more equal level and encourages less confident cyclists to get on their bikes as well as making us all feel safer.
Of course it also helps pedestrians as they don't have cars hurtling pass, hence they feel safer.

Kevin Wayne BLENCOWE
(Labour & Co-operative)

Yes I do. I fully supported Mill Road having a 20mph limit and argue that logically all the side street feeder roads should be the same. Perhaps the whole of Petersfield could be a 20mph zone in the future if the residents support it.

Lewis HERBERT
(Labour & Co-operative)

The county and city councils should jointly investigate how to maximise 20mph local streets, and implement measures to switch the balance of local streets in favour of non-car users, including maximising opportunities for new design in new development.

This also needs to add measures that physically prevent vehicle speeding, to add to enforcement measures.

Stuart Edwin NEWBOLD
(Labour & Co-operative)

Yes.

Gerri BIRD
(Labour Party)

I would like to see some consultation with city residents on this issue, I myself would agree with 20mphin residential areas.

Browne Edward Bengt CARLSSON
(Labour Party)

Here in Romsey Labour have been calling in our newsletters for an expansion of the 20mph zone in North Romsey to encompass the entire area between Mill Road and Coldham's Lane. There is also a good case for this to be extended to the Argyle Street area and for greater action to be taken against rat-running there.

Brooks Road, Coldham's Lane and Mill Road all need a speed limit higher than 20mph (although there is a definite need for road safety improvements on all three). Otherwise I believe a 20mph zone should, subject to public consultation, be introduced in residential roads throughout Cambridge. This would obviously need to be accompanied by coordinated measures to try to increase enforcement of such limits.

Dan COOPER
(Labour Party)

I would push for a dual speed limit of 30MPH for buses and 20MPH for cars and all other vehicles. This would encourage people who still want to travel by some kind of automotive vehicle at speed (or can not physically use a bicycle) the ability to do so by bus instead of car. This would drop the number of vehicles on the road and would improve cycle safety, while pleasing residents who use public transport.

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

Yes - I know that Labour promotes this, and I agree with it. Enforcement may be helped by measures which make speeding more difficult.

Kenny LATUNDE-DADA
(Labour Party)

I agree with this in principle and will support it subject to a thorough investigation jointly by both the city and county councils as to its viability and feasibility. I also support the efforts of Labour Councillors on this.

Gail Elizabeth MARCHANT-DAISLEY
(Labour Party)

In the city yes, this is already something that I have been talking about to residents with a view to advocating if elected.

Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

Yes, I do.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

I totally agree that 20mph should be the speed limit in towns.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

There will always be drivers who ignore speed limits but anything which makes life easier for pedestrians and cyclists should be encouraged. Speed bumps may have to be used to control the speed of vehicles.

Sarah Elizabeth BROWN
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. See also previous answer.

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

I do support reducing the speed limits on the city road and supported the campaign to reduce the speed limit on Madingley Road from 40 to 30 miles an hour. I also support reducing the speed limit in residential areas to 20 miles per hour

Susannah KERR
(Liberal Democrat)

For many narrow, residential streets I completely agree that 20mph should be the norm. I completely disagree that the city should be subjected to a blanket 30mph limit as it has been in the past. I am pleased that many of our residential streets are already 20mph, but would like to see this extended in other areas as appropriate.

Simon Philip Jonathan KIGHTLEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

Andrea Curti REINER
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, for Cambridge. I cannot speak to the surrounding villages.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, but then most of my ward is already agreed as a 20 MPH zone.

Paul SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

Most of the residential streets in Romsey already have 20 mph. The question now is what about the shopping and amenity areas such as Mill Road itself?

Edd STONHAM
(Liberal Democrat)

20mph limits are a great idea in residential areas however the issues is how we enforce them. We also need to look at the road design of some of or residential areas and these changes will help reduce speeds in those areas.

Sheila STUART
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, and this is something I have campaigned for in the past. A blanket 20mph speed would also negate the need for traffic calming in certain areas, which is something that is regularly requested by local residents but is difficult to achieve because of the difficulty in funding such projects.

Jean Susan SWANSON
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes - it would certainly be preferable to more traffic calming measures. Wulfstan Way is to become a 20mph street. It would need to be enforced of course.
I do not know about villages needs.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

Timothy Derek WARD
(Liberal Democrat)

I agree in respect of Cambridge.

I do not have adequate knowledge of conditions in the surrounding villages to be able to comment; this question might be better asked of the councillors for the villages.

Roman ZNAJEK
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, for residential as opposed to major connecting roads in the City. I would be inclined to support 20mph in the villages, but that is an issue for them rather than for City Councillors.

Aubrey Malcolm CHAPMAN
(UK Independence Party)

We believe that this kind of thing should be decided in a democratic way at a local level. If you believe that such a rule should be introduced, you would, under a UKIP administration be able to raise a petition: with enough signatures collected in a limited time, you could force a local referendum, the result of which would be binding upon the local authority.

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