Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2010: West Chesterton

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2010.
Polling date: Thursday 6th May 2010
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Max BOYCE  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Anette KARIMI  (Conservative Party)
  • Jahanshah KARIMI  (Conservative Party)
  • Paul Francis MCHUGH  (Labour Party)
  • Sarah PEAKE  (Green Party)
  • Stephen PEAKE  (Green Party)
  • Mike SARGEANT  (Labour Party)
  • Damien TUNNACLIFFE  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for West Chesterton ward candidates (5 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5 

# Question 1

There is a major shortage of cycle parking all around the city. Cycle theft is over 10% of all reported crime in the County. Do you have any suggestions for locations for cycle parking? Would you be willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in your ward? How will you work towards a situation where every resident and every worker in every ward can keep a bike safe?

Max BOYCE
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jahanshah KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

I strongly support greater provision of secure cycle-parking places. I have no problem, in principle, about replacing on-street car parking spaces with cycle parking where this would work well. I have to say that I can't think of any places in West Chesterton ward where this would be necessary; I think that this is much more a city centre issue and I support (and use myself) the secure and dry cycle parking in the Park Street Car Park. It is absurd that it is easier to find a car parking space at Cambridge station than a space where one can lock one's bike securely.

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

In order to support local businesses, people need to be able to park their bikes nearby. For example, more cycle parking is needed on Mitcham’s Corner. I suggest outside the empty greengrocer’s shop on Chesterton Road. New businesses should include secure cycle parking for customers and employees in their building plans. For example, I would encourage the new Co-op on Chesterton Road to provide extensive secure bike parking for a range of bikes including tandems, tricycles and those with trailers. Developers of new buildings should provide secure bike parking that is built for purpose, well lit and possibly monitored by CCTV.

In West Chesterton, some people are choosing to give up or reject car ownership for economic as well as environmental reasons. I am willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in small residential streets where not all householders own a car and where the flow of traffic would not be impeded.

I would encourage stakeholders (such as local people; building developers; police; community groups (e.g. Cambridge Cycling Campaign); local bike shops; schools (local and language); and government organisations (e.g. County Council’s road safety department)) to liaise closely to encourage a joined-up approach to bike safety.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

In order to support local businesses, people need to be able to park their bikes nearby. For example, more cycle parking is needed on Mitcham’s Corner. I suggest outside the empty greengrocer’s shop on Chesterton Road. New businesses should include secure cycle parking for customers and employees in their building plans. For example, I would encourage the new Co-op on Chesterton Road to provide extensive secure bike parking for a range of bikes including tandems, tricycles and those with trailers. Developers of new buildings should provide secure bike parking that is built for purpose, well lit and possibly monitored by CCTV.

In West Chesterton, some people are choosing to give up or reject car ownership for economic as well as environmental reasons. I am willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in small residential streets where not all householders own a car and where the flow of traffic would not be impeded.

I would encourage stakeholders (such as local people; building developers; police; community groups (e.g. Cambridge Cycling Campaign); local bike shops; schools (local and language); and government organisations (e.g. County Council’s road safety department)) to liaise closely to encourage a joined-up approach to bike safety.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

As someone who cycles for work and leisure, I am fully supportive of increased cycle parking. There is a shortage both in central Cambridge and in the residential areas. Increased provision should be by a combination of on-street and pavement parking.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

[Transcribed from paper response]

[4th sentence:] Yes

[Last sentence:] Need more time to think about this.

# Question 2

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Max BOYCE
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jahanshah KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

Yes, I do (see below).

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

Cyclists have a responsibility to cycle safely and should abide by the law – for the benefit of all road users. Irresponsible cyclists should expect to be stopped and fined where this is fair and reasonable. However, it is important that the police are realistic about the relative dangers of irresponsible cyclists as opposed to irresponsible motorists. One night on Sidney Street, I witnessed the police stopping a cyclist who did not have a front light (but who was otherwise riding responsibly), while a car went by at high speed. The policeman continued to lecture the cyclist and did not try to stop the motorist who was posing a significant danger to pedestrians on this very narrow street.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

Cyclists have a responsibility to cycle safely and should abide by the law – for the benefit of all road users. Irresponsible cyclists should expect to be stopped and fined where this is fair and reasonable. However, it is important that the police are realistic about the relative dangers of irresponsible cyclists as opposed to irresponsible motorists. One night on Sidney Street, my wife witnessed the police stopping a cyclist who did not have a front light (but was otherwise riding responsibly), while a car went by at high speed. The policeman continued to lecture the cyclist and did not try to stop the motorist who was posing a significant danger to pedestrians on this very narrow street.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

I think traffic policing should look at all transgressions including by cyclists and motorists. We all need to take into account the needs of others whether it be motorists parking in bus lanes and on cycleways or cyclists ignoring traffic lights or riding without lights. I do not think that this will be resolved just by policing and welcome the Government money for £5 an hour cycle training.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

# Question 3

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

Max BOYCE
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jahanshah KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

Yes, I do.

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

The introduction of a 20mph speed limit for residential streets will bring a number of benefits for the community, including increased safety for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and reduced fuel and carbon dioxide emissions.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

The introduction of a 20mph speed limit for residential streets will bring a number of benefits for the community, including increased safety for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and reduced fuel and carbon dioxide emissions.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

I totally agree that 20mph should be the speed limit in towns.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

# Question 4

Gilbert Road currently includes cycle lanes that motorists can legally park in. This means that cyclists, including some of the many hundreds of children in nearby schools, have to dodge in and out of the traffic stream, which is dangerous and unpleasant. Given that Huntingdon Road has cyclist-only cycle lanes yet is a similar situation in terms of parking in front gardens, do you support the removal of on-street parking on Gilbert Road?

Max BOYCE
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jahanshah KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

I cycle regularly on Gilbert Road and I find the on-street parked cars annoying. However, I don't find the need to pull out to get past them as dangerous as you maintain (I have read your update in newsletter 89) as for much of the day Gilbert Road is relatively quiet. I do support measures to reduce traffic speed and would want to see these firmly enforced. I fear that mandatory cycle lanes would do an injustice to residents: Gardens in Gilbert Road aren't generally large enough to take more than one vehicle (I think that in much of Huntingdon Road they are) nore are there sufficient side streets near enough to cope with overflow parking. So deliveries, tradesmen and additional cars are likely to risk parking on cycle lanes anyway; the gain will be insufficient to justify the pain of enforcement for these residents. There's a balance to be struck here and I don't think the case for prohibition of on-street car parking is strong enough. I'm sorry that I can't go with you on this one.

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

At the moment, Gilbert Road is not safe for cyclists. As a result, the headteacher at Chesterton Community College encourages pupils to avoid cycling on Gilbert Road. Unfortunately, this means that many children then cycle home via Mitcham’s Corner, which is also dangerous for cyclists and needs to be urgently redeveloped. Safety should be at the heart of planning for cycling provision.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

At the moment, Gilbert Road is not safe for cyclists. As a result, the headteacher at Chesterton Community College encourages pupils to avoid cycling on Gilbert Road. Unfortunately, this means that many children then cycle home via Mitcham’s Corner, which is also dangerous for cyclists and needs to be urgently redeveloped. Safety should be at the heart of planning for cycling provision.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

Huntingdon Road has much larger front gardens than Gilbert Road, so this is not a valid comparison. Milton Road is a better comparison.
I do support the removal of on-street parking in Gilbert Road as long as it is part of a a programme of making cycling much easier and safer in Cambridge. Currently we have piecemeal provision which means that cyclists often have to go a long way out of their way to get from one place to another.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

# Question 5

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the past?

Max BOYCE
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jahanshah KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Francis MCHUGH
(Labour Party)

I'm concerned that the edges of roads have again suffered following the exceptional winter frost this year and aren't being repaired quickly enough. I've used the County Council's pothole reporting facility and urge everyone to do likewise. The same is true of dual-use pavements, though here it's good to report that the Milton Road (north side) dual use pavement has just had its markings re-painted which helps greatly.

I'm concerned by ambiguous or simply unclear messages being given to cyclists at major junctions, for instance it is difficult to know what the highway engineers intend one to do when cycling along Elizabeth Way through the large Chesterton Road roundabout.

I want to see much more secure cycle parking at the railway station and in the city centre.

I want to see enforcement of one-way cycling in the city centre triangle as rogue cyclists ignoring the one-way system give us all a bad name.

Sarah PEAKE
(Green Party)

I live on Chesterton Road with my husband and three children. We have not had a car since August 2009. We all cycle or walk every day.

As a family, we made a film about cycling in Cambridge, which we would love to share with you all at some stage. We have all done the London-to-Cambridge and Oxford-to-Cambridge bike rides on many occasions in the last ten years.

My husband has an enduring interest in sustainable transport. Recently, he has decided not to fly because of his concerns about its environmental impact.

We enjoy walking, cycling and running locally and are keen to see that more resources are allocated to these activities, making the community a healthier and safer place for all.

Stephen PEAKE
(Green Party)

I live on Chesterton Road with my wife and three children. We have not had a car since August 2009. We all cycle or walk every day.

As a family, we made a film about cycling in Cambridge, which we would love to share with you all at some stage. We have all done the London-to-Cambridge and Oxford-to-Cambridge bike rides on many occasions in the last ten years.

I have an enduring interest in sustainable transport. Recently, I have decided not to fly because of my concerns about its environmental impact.

I enjoy walking, cycling and running locally and am keen to see that more resources are allocated to these activities, making the community a healthier and safer place for all.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

I have worked with councillors, the County Council and local residents to try to improve the safety of Gilbert Road. The improved lighting is a step forward, but we need the County Council to work harder to come up with a provision that is generally supported.

Damien TUNNACLIFFE
(Liberal Democrat)

I try to set an example by only walking or cycling and almost never using a car in the city.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.