Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2010: Market

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2010.
Polling date: Thursday 6th May 2010
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • James Alexander BOYD  (Conservative Party)
  • Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Pam STACEY  (Labour Party)
  • Jack Benjamin TOYE  (Green Party)

Questions for Market ward candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

There is a major shortage of cycle parking all around the city. Cycle theft is over 10% of all reported crime in the County. Do you have any suggestions for locations for cycle parking? Would you be willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in your ward? How will you work towards a situation where every resident and every worker in every ward can keep a bike safe?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

I agree that street cycle parking would be useful near community facilities like shops and pubs. In many cases this could be provided with little or no loss of car parking because of the inefficiencies inherent in allocating road space between car parking and other uses, with bits left over which can be used for cycle parking. However, I am more sceptical of what can be achieved to improve street cycle parking for residents as I doubt cycle racks will be close enough to most people’s homes to be attractive to users.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

I know there is a huge shortage of safe places to leave your bike in the City centre. Perhaps some of the space around Parkers Piece could be considered. There are some racks which could be extended such as those outside Sainsbury's as long as they would not disrupt delivery areas. Cyclists want to have secure sites which are well lit.
Big improvments need to be done at the station.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I would like to see a more proactive City and County Council with regards to cyclists. Lets look at where the most cyclists are in the city, make sure they are amply catered for with safe places to store their bikes, near their locations of work and leisure. And lets also have a council that promotes cycling as a mode of transport in Cambridge to those citizens who at the moment use their car to get to their workplace. As to the on-street parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking, i believe that the revenue generated by the on-street parking is an important in contributing to the council's budget for the city. I would like to see on-street cycle parking being constructed in places that compete with the car, showing up the use of a car in a city like Cambridge as one that cannot ultimately work in a cost-effective and environmental manner, compared to the brilliant bicycle!

# Question 2

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, though the highest priority should go to enforcement against offences causing danger to others, for example, the offence of stopping on the approaches to crossings.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

On my way home last night there was a cyclist without lights who came onto the roundabout and it would have been very easy for me not to have seen him. Did he realise the danger he had created?
Many cyclists using a cycle lane complain about buses getting too close to them when they pass. A lot more could be done to promote better behaviour.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I admire the work the police force do around the darker months of the year, i'm sure they help to save quite a few lives by fining the odd cyclist here and there. If your are a cyclist on a busy city road, in the dark, with little protection to save you if you were unfortunate enough to be hit by another vehicle, then a police fine which would lead to you purchasing a set of lights for your bike, is a small price to pay in comparison to losing a limb or a life in an accident.

# Question 3

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, but then most of my ward is already agreed as a 20 MPH zone.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

There will always be drivers who ignore speed limits but anything which makes life easier for pedestrians and cyclists should be encouraged. Speed bumps may have to be used to control the speed of vehicles.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I really like this idea in residential areas, and i have heard it being discussed in various social groups of mine for the last few years. A 20mph speed limit would level the playing field between car users, pedestrians and cyclists, as the journey time to get from one bit of a residential area to another would be similar for all modes of transport. And the difference between being hit by a car at 20mph and 30mph is surely significant, with the victim being hit at 20mph having a greater chance of recovery than the 30mph one. I'm with you on this one!

# Question 4

Some cyclists have told us they feel unsafe riding along the two short stretches of Lensfield Road and East Road where car parking is allowed in spite of the heavy traffic. Such car parking narrows the space available considerably. Do you support removal of this car parking in the interests of improved traffic flow and the safety of cyclists?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

No parking is allowed on East Road now. The problem is enforcement which is not available on a continuous basis within any likely resource scenario. A new set of loading restrictions will be implemented soon. Hopefully they will be better respected by motorists without a parking attendant standing there all the time. I support the changes and hope they are successful.

I cycle regularly in Lensfield Road and it is not my expereince that there is a significant hazard to cyclists from the existing parking there. If evidence can be adduced to the contrary from accident records I am open to being convinced otherwise, however.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

These are both very busy roads and the removal of cars parking would make it much safer for cyclists and hopefully reduce the congestion.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

East Road is such a busy arterial road into the centre of Cambridge, that i cannot understand why anyone would wish to stop their car and attempt to get out of it in the middle of such a dense flow of traffic. I would be in favour of a time period each day where Car Parking is banned, linked into busier parts of the day on East Road where to stop one's car is only going to cause tailbacks further down the road.

# Question 5

Do you support rescinding the part-time ban on cycling in Fitzroy Street and Burleigh Street?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. I have always opposed this ban. I am not aware of this being a matter of party policy, though.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

There must be clear signs so both pedestrians and cyclists are fully aware of what is allowed and behave in a responsible manner.
I am somewhat wary of cyclists in mainly pedestrian areas as I was knocked over by a cyclist who was travelling too fast.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

Fitzroy Street and Burleigh Street are such busy streets for shoppers and traders in the day, that to allow cyclists free-access riding their bikes up and down the street at peak times, has a potential real risk for accidents. Having said this, i am not a huge fan of the cycle route that weaves it's way around the back of the Grafton Centre, like it was an embarrassment to the city planners. I would like to see a cycle path put onto Fitzroy and Burleigh Street, for use at all times of the day by cyclists, and clearly distinguished in colour from the main pedestrianised part of the street. This would be good for trade, cycling transport links to the rest of the city, and safer for pedestrians.

# Question 6

We would like to see the Downing Street / Mill Lane route becoming the default priority direction at its junction with Trumpington Street. This would enable the high pedestrian and cycle flows to be catered for better. Do you support this idea?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

I would need to be convinced it would be a realistic proposal. There are a lot of cars using that junction at times. Just painting different white lines might not have the expected effect.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

This can be a confusing junction especially when the Trumpington Park and Ride bus is turning into Pembroke Street and if the priority is changed this would have to be considered. There is also the queue of cars for the car park so a very busy junction which needs to be improved with careful consideration before anything is changed.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I do support this idea yes. It is a dangerous junction that favours the car user at the moment. A re-aligning of transport priorities would be a smart choice at this junction.

# Question 7

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the past?

James Alexander BOYD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

I strongly support cycling in Cambridge, it being my main means of transport here, and believe my record of practical measures over many years stands scrutiny. I am a long-standing member of the Cycling Campaign and note that Lib Dem members of the AJC seem to be the only ones to declare membership (as personal interests) at meetings. I have personally worked to improve facilities for cyclists at the station.
I strongly support public transport as a means of meeting demands for people to get around our City. But I do not believe cars can be entirely eliminated. They must be accommodated for the many journeys where cycling or public transport is not a serious option.

Pam STACEY
(Labour Party)

I was the cycle co-ordinator for my former workplace and used to attend the Cycling Campaign meetings. I got several of my work colleagues to to the cycling training to give them the confidence to face the Cambridge traffic and ride their bike.
Weather permitting I walk the two miles to my workplace and use the bus at other times. I frequently contact Stagecoach when I am aware of problems and try to get them resolved.

Jack Benjamin TOYE
(Green Party)

I always use my bike as the favoured method of getting around Cambridge, and actively encourage my friends to do the same when they are visiting the city. I think Cambridge has great potential to give Bristol a run for it's money as the best city in the UK to cycle around, if only the consensus is there from the council as well. If elected as Green Party City Councillor for Market Ward, i promise to be a strong voice for your Cycling Campaign, as it is one i passionately believe in.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.