Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2010: Newnham

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2010.
Polling date: Thursday 6th May 2010
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Rod CANTRILL  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Len FREEMAN  (Labour Party)
  • Stephen Richard OLIVER  (Conservative Party)
  • James Christopher YOUD  (Green Party)

Questions for Newnham ward candidates (5 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5 

# Question 1

There is a major shortage of cycle parking all around the city. Cycle theft is over 10% of all reported crime in the County. Do you have any suggestions for locations for cycle parking? Would you be willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in your ward? How will you work towards a situation where every resident and every worker in every ward can keep a bike safe?

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

I recognise that there continues to be a problem regarding the amount of safe cycle parking around the city. I am committed to finding new locations where additional parking can be located. In Newnham, I was instrumental in the additional cycle racks being provided on Lammas Land a year or so ago.

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

Cycle parking - particularly secure parking is a major problem, a key sites like the station and city centre. I would be prepared to support this proposal. Retailers, employers iand colleges in the city should be strongly encouraged to provide attachments wherever possible to walls, (eg even a simple stout ring), to facilitate this.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

We need to change the ways that we look at cycle access in all planning and development projects. Cycling is a more prevalent in Cambridge than in many cities and so we should change the criteria by which new developments are assessed to favour better provision of cycle access and parking. Developers need to take more responsibility for providing cycle parking through s106 agreements. We need to address cycle parking at transport interchanges such as the railway station, Park and Ride facilities and the bus station so that, for example, rail and bus network franchisees support more of the direct costs of providing secure cycle parking at these interchanges.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

The Green Party fully supports the principle of replacing car-parking with secure cycle parking, especially in the city centre and close to colleges and other workplaces.
While it is hard to ensure 100% that bicycles are secure from theft. Secure bike parking that is well lit can go a long way towards this.
The police also need to take bike crime more seriously. Being someone that myself has had several bikes stolen reported them and never seen them again, this should be a priority. I think in particular the police should concentrate on organised bike crime that no doubt also takes place.
Of course at the end of the day. Where you park a bike and with what lock is the most important factor in whether it could potentially be stolen or not. Educating short term visitors and students could stop a laissez-faire approach. As councillor I would like to ensure that the police and council work effectively with each other to stop crime and build safe cycle parking.

# Question 2

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

I believe all road users should behave responsibly. As a ward councillor i have supported the decision by West Central Area Committee for the police to focus on traffic policing - not only relating to cyclists who may be offenders but also other road users who may cause accidents for cyclists

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

Yes - we all know the dangers that riding without lights causes, and the bad publicity that careless cycling causes. Clearer demarcation between pedestrian/cycling areas may need consideration too.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

Yes, but this has to go hand in hand with better education. We need to do more to encourage responsible and courteous use of our shared roads and footpaths. The University, colleges and language schools could do much more to ensure that overseas students coming to Cambridge for the first time are familiar with the Highway Code and are encouraged to wear appropriate clothing, use lights, obey traffic signals on the road and respect the needs of pedestrians. I like initiatives that reinforce good behaviour, like forcing cyclists without lights to "buy" lights on the spot, instead of just paying a fine.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

As I have already said I support the police giving over more time to stop bike thefts. In terms of policing of cyclists I believe it is important for both cyclists and pedestrians in particular if cycling is properly policed. Then the few that do brake the law don't make the rest of us look like a load of out-laws.
I think a warning system, three strikes then a fine would be just as effective as fixed fines and with this educating those who consistently offend. No reasonable cyclist should go without lights or cycle or pavements where this is not permitted.

# Question 3

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

I do support reducing the speed limits on the city road and supported the campaign to reduce the speed limit on Madingley Road from 40 to 30 miles an hour. I also support reducing the speed limit in residential areas to 20 miles per hour

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

Yes - I know that Labour promotes this, and I agree with it. Enforcement may be helped by measures which make speeding more difficult.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

I don't believe in blanket speed limits that are unsubstantiated by evidence and which are not the subject of consultation, however I absolutely agree that we need 20mph speed limits in some residential streets, areas of intense pedestrian activity and outside schools and playgrounds. I also think we need to be more creative about how we enforce compliance with speed limits through education and "smart" signals. I am concerned about the proliferation of speed limitation devices such as road narrowing and speed cushions that result in large variations in speed along busy roads, restrict the progress of emergency vehicles and represent a road safety hazard in themselves for cyclists and motor cyclists.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

I do think we should be pushing to see 20MPH speed limits for residential streets across the city and 20MPH for the entirety of the city centre and those busy roads most used by cyclists.
20MPH puts cyclists and other road users at a more equal level and encourages less confident cyclists to get on their bikes as well as making us all feel safer.
Of course it also helps pedestrians as they don't have cars hurtling pass, hence they feel safer.

# Question 4

We would like to see the Downing Street / Mill Lane route becoming the default priority direction at its junction with Trumpington Street. This would enable the high pedestrian and cycle flows to be catered for better. Do you support this idea?

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

I do think this is an idea the should be explored - at the moment it is very confusing for all road users

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

In principle, yes. I think that the question of bus access from Trumpington St into Downing St also needs to be looked at at the same time, so that public transport (eg from the Park and Ride), has reasonably free access into Downing St as well.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

If this proposal is substantiated by evidence of traffic data and accepted by residents, businesses, road and footpath users through consultation, then I would support it.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

I do support this idea and think it would be of great advantage to Newnham residents who use this route. It is often quite a dangerous cross roads as cyclists often don't know whether cars are turning into Pembroke Street on heading straight on.
Beyond this I would also call for the number of spaces at city centre car parks (especially Grand Arcade) to be cut dramatically which would remove a lot of vehicular traffic from central streets. I don't think this is the only instance in which a junction could be redefined to give cyclists and pedestrians priority and think that they should be looked at case by case.

# Question 5

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the past?

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

As a ward councillor i have promoted cycling at all levels of the city council. As Executive Councillor I was responsible for introducing the Councils Employee Green Travel Plan - that encouraged employees to use public transport, cycling or walking. As part of the scheme we have also introduced a pool car scheme in cooperation with Street car

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

I am very much in favour of the Chisholm trail, as a lifelong cyclist in and around Cambridge. More cycle parking at the station is a priority - it's a great pity that The recent CB1 agreement (section 106) has allowed the developer to 'rephase' critical elements including the station cycle park, which endangers the plan.
In Newnham I would like to see a Park and Ride considered - this would ease traffic generally along Barton Road, making it safer for cyclists and helping to keep buses moving more freely.

Stephen Richard OLIVER
(Conservative Party)

I am a road safety advocate through membership of both the Institute of Advanced Motorists and the RoSPA Advanced Drivers Association. I provide voluntary road safety training to drivers on behalf of both organisations. Awareness of the specific hazards posed by intense mixed use of roads by both motorists and cyclists is a critical concern in Cambridge. Since moving to Cambridge I have become far more aware of cycling issues, cycle regularly and I am in the process of selling my car!

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

I am a cyclist and have been since I was young. Also being a pedestrian and occasional bus user I am aware that there can be a conflict between these sustainable forms of transport within the city. I think the answer to this has to be to make room for pedestrians and cyclists as a priority. If this means pushing out cars altogether then fine and if it means buses being redirected then so be it.
We are the cycling capital of England but we must do more to encourage new folk to cycle and those who do so already to make it their main mode of transport.
I would also like to see dutch style cycle-ways on road and see more separation between cyclists and pedestrians to ensure that pedestrians don't feel intimidated.
In terms of further sustainable transport it strikes me that the interchange at Cambridge railway station whether you are trying to park your bike or travel with it is very substandard. I would like to see an urgent decision to be made on provision for bikes there.
As a recent survey said a majority of people still drive to work in the city, I think this proves why we need to dramatically improve cycling facilities and make sure that it is cycling that the majority choose.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.