Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2012: Market

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2012.
Polling date: Thursday 3rd May 2012
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Tim BICK  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Brett Mark HUGHES  (Green Party)
  • Noel KAVANAGH  (Labour Party)
  • Edward James Anthony TURNHAM  (Conservative Party)

Questions for Market ward candidates (9 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9 

# Question 1

Do you support our proposal for 'The Chisholm Trail', a cycling and walking route that would run roughly along the railway, joining up the Science Park to Addenbrookes? More details are in our Cycling Vision 2016 document. This high-profile scheme would cut journey times, give people a genuine, realistic alternative to car use and help the city cope with the population increase which will take place in the coming years.

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I think it's a visionary project and a splendid challenge to all serving on the relevant public bodies. I support it.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Yes - Absolutely

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I support The Chisholm Trail initiative as it should encourage more people to use cycles to commute. However, before the proposed route is finalised residents along the planned route should be consulted. Concerns have already been raised about the building of a new bridge over the Cam and the impact on Stourbridge Common. Has consideration been given to using the existing cycle/ pedestrian bridge that links Chesterton to Riverside on The Chisholm Trail route?

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I broadly agree with Cycling Vision 2016, which contains some very well thought-out proposals. The Chisholm trail would be a particularly important addition to our infrastructure.

I cycle several miles in Cambridge every day. Although the situation for cyclists has improved over the last few years, there are many more improvements that could be made to our streets.

# Question 2

Would you reinstate the full-time Cycling Officer position, or even expand this to two full-time posts? This post has been crucial in the past for scrutinising new developments for cycling-related issues, as well as developing work to promote responsible cycling.

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I think it's better to talk about this in terms of work output delivered, rather than job titles. I have accepted the new situation on the basis that it is a different but more efficient way of performing the same work, not a reduction in the City Council's contribution to Walking and Cycling.
To increase the current resource I'd be driven by the specific extra output to the public that would be achieved, against the resources that we had available and the rival claims and their promised outputs. But I remain positive about the City Council's role in supporting cycling and I start from a sympathetic position.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Yes - without hesitation

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

In complete agreement with the reinstating the full-time Cycling Officer. Was very disappointed when the Lib Dems rejected the proposal made by Labour Party to have a full-time Cycling Officer at the Budget Meeting on 23 February.I think the number of cyclists in Cambridge justifies having two full-time Cycling Officers.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I consider the removal of the Cycling Officer to be a mistake. There are many more efficiencies that could have been made at the Council, instead of cutting this position. It should certainly be the case that all officers are well aware of the importance of making our roads cycle-friendly, but sadly this is not yet the case.

# Question 3

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. And I think they need to be supported by better signage from the highway authority in some aspects and by education of foreign visitors.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Yes

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I support the fair enforcement by the police of all traffic regulations, including fines for cyclists not having lights, ignoring red lights and reckless, anti-social cycling. However, as police resources are limited, I believe it is better for the safety of the public if the limited police resources are used to enforce the 20 mph speed limit for vehicles in residential areas, for example, rather than concentrating on cyclists.
I think that it would be more effective if there was a city wide strategy to raise awareness and educate the public about anti social cycling that involved the police, the council, the media, and the Cycling Campaign, A focus should be put on foreign students through their language schools and the bike hire shops. A practical thing would be for safety guidance leaflets to be issued to every cyclist by hire shopsand all hire bikes to be fitted with lights. Also encourage the hire shops to supply safety helmets with each bike hired.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I agree that traffic policing needs to be improved. I was proud to be present when Cambridge's last Conservative councillor, Chris Howell, fought successfully for speeding to be retained as a policing priority in Coleridge.

It shouldn't be necessary to declare a police priority in order for the police to take firm action against inconsiderate cyclists. With other potential priorities being high on the agenda - burglary, anti-social behaviour, motorist speeding, etc. - I would be hesitant to add cyclists to the list, and risk diluting the value of the 'priorities'.

It is certainly the case that many cyclists adopt aggressive, illegal tactics as a result of poor road layouts and inappropriate rules. There should be a greater difference between the rules that apply to cars and those that apply to bikes, which are much smaller and less dangerous vehicles.

# Question 4

The City is currently conducting a consultation on taxi licensing. This Campaign strongly supports the proposal that complaints should be taken into account in determining if a driver is a fit and proper person to hold a taxi license. We prefer Option 1 in the consultation as this allows evidence of both offences and complaints to be taken together. We also suggest that complaints and offences should be considered over three and five year periods, as well as over one year (which is the proposal in the consultation), as this makes it far easier to set trigger levels that are likely to catch the (few) rogue taxi drivers without jeopardising the others. What is your view?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

My declared position is that taxi licensing should be used more effectively to address instances of poor taxi driving relative to other road users. I would prefer to hear the outcome of the current consultation and the contribution of others in it before coming to a final view on the method. The ideas that you suggest here seem quite good ones to me.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

I strongly support CCC position.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I agree with the Cycling Campaign's view on the Taxi licensing consultation.
Also a need to monitor the driving behaviour of bus drivers.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I agree with your view. My long experience of cycling tells me that the most aggressive drivers on Cambridge's streets tend to be taxi drivers, although there are doubtless many considerate and safe taxi drivers as well. We should certainly avoid creating extra stress for the good drivers, while bringing in measures that will deter bad practice by the rogue minority.

# Question 5

The Department for Transport has now authorised the use of a clear 'No entry except cycles' sign, in recognition of the clear safety benefits of allowing two-way cycling, which means shorter cycle journeys and fewer junctions. There are a small number of streets left in Cambridge which anomalously do not allow two-way cycling. Will you support proposals for two-way cycling in Fitzwilliam Street? Are there any others you would support?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I can't see why not!
Mercers Row and Swann's Road

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Yes I do.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Fully support two-way cycling in Fitzwilliam Street as long as the signs are clear for motorists to be aware.
Regent Terrace needs attention because of the mingling of cyclists, cars and pedestrians(including people emerging from Avery pub) using this narrow road.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I am generally in favour of two-way cycling; its prohibition simply encourages otherwise law-abiding cyclists to break the law. However, Fitzwilliam Street and other roads in Cambridge are very narrow, so careful thought is needed here regarding the creation of contraflow cycle lanes. In very narrow roads, cyclists will have to accept that they will have to dismount and get on the pavement when a car is coming the other way.

# Question 6

Do you support our call for a third cycle park in the city centre? The Grand Arcade cycle park is now often full. If the Council wants to increase the number of people who can access the city centre for economic reasons, cycling is a clear way to do this

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I do support this. I think you are right that shortage of cycle parking is becoming a constraint for using a bike into the centre. As well, I'm still looking for smaller opportunities for on-street racks - and am pleased that we have one coming up for Sidney Street.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

This is, I think, top priority.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Give full support for at least one more cycle park in central Cambridge and it is a good suggestion to use Post Office Terrace.
The Market Square desperately needs refurbishment. The cost would probably be too prohibitive but I think having a cycle park under Market Square should be considered.
There arealso still places around the city where more secure cycle racks can be located.
Good to see there will finally be provision for more cycle parking at the railway station but I strongly oppose any suggestion to introduce charges for parking cycles on the CB1 site.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

Yes. I also support turning some car spaces into cycle spaces, in our multi-story parks.

# Question 7

Some cyclists have told us they feel unsafe riding along the two short stretches of Lensfield Road and East Road where car parking is allowed in spite of the heavy traffic. Such car parking narrows the space available considerably, and on East Road the new Tesco store has made things worse. Do you support a complete ban on parking/loading/stopping in favour of a Dutch-style cycleway, in the interests of improved traffic flow and the safety of cyclists?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I understand and experience the problem. My belief is this would be best addressed in some strategic project to ease congestion particularly for public transport as well as cycling, as it would be better to consider the interests of the businesses in the context of a broader scheme. I would favour such a scheme being brought forward.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

It would be a godsend!

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I support the a complete ban on parking on East Road and Lensfield Road to make it safer for cyclists. Options would need to be explored, however, to take into account the need for businesses to have deliveries

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I have considered the arguments here, but I am not convinced that a complete ban on parking/loading/stopping would allow local businesses to continue operating.

# Question 8

We would like to see the Pembroke Street / Mill Lane route becoming the default priority direction at its junction with Trumpington Street. This would enable the high pedestrian and cycle flows to be catered for better. Do you support this idea?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

The current junction is not very satisfactory as it is. I'd like to see a proper analysis of your idea, but I think a change might require control by traffic lights, as otherwise it would not succeed in protecting cyclists as much as it should.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Yes

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Yes, I think this is a very good idea.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

It's a very irksome junction but I don't see that this change would improve things for cyclists, except perhaps for those turning left from Pembroke Street onto Trumpington Street. Almost all motor vehicles approaching this junction come from Trumpington Street; this change would retard them and hold up the cyclists stuck behind them.

# Question 9

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the recent past?

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

The most bike-racked street length anywhere - Fitzroy Street and Burleigh Street! I led this refurbishment project which greatly expanded cycle parking. I also have championed the improved parking at the corner of King Street and Manor Street and advocated the provision in Fisher Square.
I have been active in setting Neighbourhood Policing priorities for both cycling without lights and cycle theft. As an advocate of the new City Centre Neighbourhood Police Patrol unit, I am pleased to see it has paid off in very significant reductions in cycle theft, which had previously seemed out of control.
I am also a prime supporter of the 20mph limit, not only in my ward, but also across all residential streets in the city. I have led the call for regulations being changed to make the limit more practical to enforce and have secured funding to improve signage.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

I also would like to see trialing of other ideas being trialed in overseas locations, to make Cambridge truly the cycling capital of the UK. In particular the dutch trial of solar embedded dedicated cycleway that powers street lighting (also helping the right to light campaign). But importantly, we should be trialing many local ideas as well to find the best solution for Cambridge.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I have been cycling in Cambridge for nearly thirty years and am a member of the Cycling Campaign. I not only use my bicycle for transport around the city but am also a club cyclist and have cycled in other countries. Cambridge cyclists, pedestrians and motorists deserve a cycle network similar to that in the Netherlands and we should aim to achieve this vision.
I would like to see a coherent transport policy established for Cambridge with cycling at its core and believe this will only happen through the co-operation between the City and County Councils.

Edward James Anthony TURNHAM
(Conservative Party)

I cycle most days between the centre and Addenbrooke's. It is mostly a pleasant experience but there is still much that could be improved, as in the rest of Cambridge.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.