Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2012: King's Hedges

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2012.
Polling date: Thursday 3rd May 2012
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Nigel GAWTHROPE  (Labour Party)
  • Anette KARIMI  (Conservative Party)
  • Neil Michael MCGOVERN  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Ian TYES  (United People's Party)

Questions for King's Hedges ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Do you support our proposal for 'The Chisholm Trail', a cycling and walking route that would run roughly along the railway, joining up the Science Park to Addenbrookes? More details are in our Cycling Vision 2016 document. This high-profile scheme would cut journey times, give people a genuine, realistic alternative to car use and help the city cope with the population increase which will take place in the coming years.

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

I do support the proposal. If elected, as executive councillor for Customer Services and Resources, I will push for the land and roadway along Cowley Road to take account of this scheme.

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

Brilliant idea in principle! I think the misguided bus should follow it as well rather than going down Milton Road and stuck in traffic! My experience as a cyclist is that there are few 'joined-up' cycling routes across Cambridge, being 'bits and pieces' with occasional sign-posting. The Chisholm Trail gives a potential 'linked' proper cycling route from the north/Kings Hedges/Milton to the railway station and I support it. I understand that the 'cycling tsar' is also planning on pursuing this (cllr Martin Curties Cambs CC) so it might happen now at last!

# Question 2

Would you reinstate the full-time Cycling Officer position, or even expand this to two full-time posts? This post has been crucial in the past for scrutinising new developments for cycling-related issues, as well as developing work to promote responsible cycling.

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

Firstly, I would note that the post is still in existence, and is now being done by two people, which can help provide different perspectives and ensure that full cover exists for holidays and in case of sickness. However, if funds allow, I would be delighted to expand the team.

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

I understand that a cycling tsar has been appointed - Cllr Martin Curtis - at Cambs CC. I am reluctant to make unfunded spending announcments prior to election. I would hope and expect that most if not all Councillors in Cambridge would be sufficiently aware of bicycle issues so that one of them (eg me if elected!) could be responsible for raising cycling issues at planning committees. This could include presenting issues raised by groups such as yourselves at these meetings. There is usually more than one solution or approach, so it might be counter-productive for a single person to be presenting these points, rather than from a multiplicity of sources.

# Question 3

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

I think that use of PSCOs and City Council staff, such as the Rangers would provide a very useful support for the police to deal with these issues. I believe that the recent approach by the City Council of issuing a FPN, but also fitting free bike lights is also correct!

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

I do not believe that this would work. Whilst spot fines and 'blitzes' catch a few, education and better-bike design is far better way to ensure that the rules are followed. For comparison, cycle helmets are not compulsory, yet a significant percentage of people use them anyway. Lights are compulsory and yet in my experience less people use lights than cycle helmets. Bikes could be designed with unremoveable lights powered by hub dynamoes. Bells could also be impossible to remove. Biles could be painted with flourescent/reflective patches for higher visibility. If junctions were better designed, sensing systems on traffic lights detected bikes, more use of left-turn bike green filters and filter lanes, less (preferably NONE!) shared use footpaths, more completely off-road cycle-only routes (like Chisholm Trail) then the problems would occur less and cycling would be safer. Of course, you could introduce a system of insurance and 'number plates' in order to trace cyclists and hold them accountable more easily....

# Question 4

The City is currently conducting a consultation on taxi licensing. This Campaign strongly supports the proposal that complaints should be taken into account in determining if a driver is a fit and proper person to hold a taxi license. We prefer Option 1 in the consultation as this allows evidence of both offences and complaints to be taken together. We also suggest that complaints and offences should be considered over three and five year periods, as well as over one year (which is the proposal in the consultation), as this makes it far easier to set trigger levels that are likely to catch the (few) rogue taxi drivers without jeopardising the others. What is your view?

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

I fully support the penalty points scheme (option 1). As a previous licensing committee member, I would agree that a wider time for complaints be presented to the committee.

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

I agree in principle that 'substantiated' complaints should be included in the assessment. I am concerned that 'unsubstantiated' complaints are included as these are raising a presumption of guilt when proven innocent. I would consider moves to limit the numbers of licensed cabs in the area as I have seen too many taxi-drivers unable to make a living in spite of working very long hours.

# Question 5

There is no usable infrastructure supporting less confident cyclists along Arbury Road, Union Lane and Church Street, but very many pinch points and parked cars. Recent proposals were opposed by Cambridge Cycling Campaign, as they risked harming cyclists interests without providing a continuous, safe route along Arbury Road and Union Lane. Do you support a cycle route from Orchard Park to Riverside Bridge and if so, what infrastructure measures do you propose to encourage cyclists of different levels of ability and confidence here?

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

The current cycling provision along Arbury Road is disjointed and unsafe. I would be keen to look at a proper off road cycle scheme through the parks and open spaces leading to the Manor, and then a crossing to come down through Arbury Court.

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

As potential candidate for Kings Hedges, I am aware of the lack of a direct joined-up cycle route from this area to the city centre or railway station. I think there are three 'linked-up' options - the Chisholm Trail (to reach the railway station/Addenbrookes/Hills Road area; Some way of linking to the bridge at Manhattan Drive/Cutter Ferry to the riverside route through Midsummer common; and/or a priority route along Stretten Avenue/Carlton Way to the top of Castle Hill. The second could link through Verulam Way, Brimley Road and require a link through to Hurst Park Avenue, with the existing crossing across Milton Road through to Chesterton Road, if better signed.
The latter might require restrictions on parking on one side of the road and/or use of 1-way system (via Harvey Goodwin Avenue) to provide safe segregated cycle route, but is a relatively quiet, traffic calmed route.

# Question 6

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the recent past?

Nigel GAWTHROPE
(Labour Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

The Liberal Democrats hold the view that this city should mostly be accessed by public transport, on foot, or by bicycle. I believe that he blanket 20mph zone for the city will provide a much safer environment. Although the City Council is not the highways authority, and thus cannot bring huge budgets to bear on cycling provision, we use our planning powers and influence to try and ensure that Cambridge is one of the best places to cycle in the UK

Ian TYES
(United People's Party)

I am not happy with the Elizabeth Way/Chesterton Road 'cycle-only' left-turn lanes on 3 of the 4 corners - they are very dangerous and unnecessary as most traffic goes straight across. I have left additional comments above in amongst the other points.
I also support the creation of Chesterton Station and this should be designed with cycling access in mind - it would be close to the Chisholm Trail as well.
I would like to see cycling considered as part of an overall transport plan for the city and sub-regiuon. I would like to see a junction-by-junction analysis throughout the city for getting the best for all road users. I would like to see a proper network of cycling routes to and through hte city from the local commuting cycling sub-region.
I would like to see safe overnight bicycle parking provided at park and ride sites so people could drive in to the park and ride site and then use their bike to reach their destination. perhaops bike scould be available for hire at these points as well? I would liek to see more space on trains for bikes. I would like to see space on buses for bikes as well, particularly express services and longer distance buses/coaches and some encuragement to use them. Whilst I oppose in principle the use of shared pavements for cycling owing to the confusion over which bit of pavement you can and cannot cycle on and the bemusement of pedestrians, if they have to be used, then they should be wide enough for cyclists to pass in opposite directions and more thought shoudl have been given to the multitude of blind junctions with people's driveways and other miscelleneous obstructions.
I contributed to the CHUMMS study and have made numerous suggestions for general traffic improvemenst in the area, all of which have bene ignored. Unless one has a position of power, one cannot make real improvements! So vote for me and I will do my best to improve cycling infrastructure for Kings Hedges in particular and for Cambridge and the necklace villages in general!

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.