Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council 2017: Chesterton

Summary: Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council, May 2017
Polling date: Thursday 4th May 2017
Division:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Peter BURKINSHAW  (UK Independence Party)
  • Kelley GREEN  (Labour Party)
  • Stephen LAWRENCE  (Green Party)
  • Connor MACDONALD  (Conservative Party)
  • Ian MANNING  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for Chesterton division candidates (8 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

# Question 1

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do for yourself?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

These days I am an infrequent cyclist, I prefer to walk short distances. I suppose you could put me in the bracket of unconfident cyclist. My partner on the other hand, is an avid cyclist, choosing to go on continental cycling holidays with my brother and father-in-law; taking part in long distance cycle races and cycling daily to work at Addenbrookes. Speaking honestly, I have concerns about their safety because of the amount of cycling they do and the heavy traffic in Cambridge, particularly in rush hour although I avoid emphasising it because cycling confidence is such an important factor in remaining safe. However, I fully support cycling and have provided bicycles for two members of staff in my small business in Cambridge.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

I cycle to and from work every week day. I’m training for two triathlons this year so am starting to get experience of sports cycling for the first time.

For younger members it’s much more important that they are separated from motor traffic in particular, but pedestrian traffic as well. It’s also important for their routes to be as green and look as inviting as possible in order to encourage cycle at a young age.

That said, properly protected routes are important for cyclists of all ages – the real divide is between those who feel under-confident about cycling, regardless of age.

# Question 2

What challenges do people face in your area that prevent them from cycling, especially children and those using cycling as a mobility aid, and how will you address them?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

Connectivity is one of the challenges people face, for example, getting from the north side of the city to the south. Elizabeth Way Roundabout and Mitcham’s Corner are both hazardous junctions. We could make connections better, especially for children where they need to cycle to school.

Better quality surfaces would assist all cyclists, including the timely filling of pot-holes, which, I’m sure, many cyclists will appreciate.

We are lucky in Chesterton, most of the main carriageways are wide enough for segregated cycle lanes but provision is still lacking in some areas, which is a concern. I would push for segregation and move away from dual use on the pavements. Chesterton Road is a key route where there should be separate space for cyclists.

Fen Road in Chesterton, has a history of poor driving especially speeding and I have worked with Labour City Councillors to encourage police to be more pro-active. Hopefully, these actions will have a positive impact on the popularity of cycling.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

There are a number of very narrow lanes and pinch points that affect those with wider cycles, which is often the case for cycles used as mobility aides.

My area is part of the Chisholm Trail, and has seen one of the few properly segregated, wide, cycle lanes in the City put in on Water Lane – the latter is a direct result of my action as a county Councillor. The next step is to improve the halingway (tow path), including access to Fen Road, to make it a truly segregated route.

Whilst I am responsible for proposing the City Deal Scheme on Green End Road – the City Deal has mucked up the implementation. Whilst it isn’t in the ward anymore, many of my constituents use it.

All the cycle lanes are substandard as they are not physically segregated from the road.

The Elizabeth Way roundabout splitting up Chesterton Road needs work, although this could be improved by completing the highways bid I had part completed to allow cyclists to use the route away from the roundabout.

# Question 3

Which aspects of current City Deal proposals do you support, and what additional measures which have not been officially proposed do you think should be explored?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

I fully support the integrated transport strategy that City Deal is delivering. By looking at all aspects of travel, including buses, it will make our roads safer for cyclists.

I look forward to the introduction of the Clean Air Zone that Cambridge City Council has applied for and hope to see more partnership working between local government and the City Deal Board to help deliver it.

I am delighted with the progress of the Chisholm Trail and would like to see other similar routes developed, connecting opposite ends of the city as well as more greenway connections between residential, employment and leisure sites.

Whilst supporting the delivery of new transport infrastructure I recognise this is expensive and would hope to see sensible spending decisions throughout the life-time of the City Deal programme. This is necessary to ensure the later tranches of money, worth up to a further £400 million, are allocated to Cambridge. The successes Labour has had in other sectors such as the new Council housing we have secured, in the right locations, will help to make Cambridge fit for the future.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

Overall the City Deal should be being far more radical. I have been pushing for it to use experimental techniques, modelled on the New York experience – since getting a motion through the County Council several years ago.

Experimental schemes should be the default, not the exception.

This would allow for far better, and more transparent, consultation. It would allow for more ideas to be tested. I do not accept that the City Deal needs to tow the line in order to reatain future money – it is only by taking residents with us and delivering quality that will see us get the remaining money allocated.

The City Deal should be trying out extra revenue generating measures to subsidise the bus network before physical changes such as closing roads permanently.

Finally, the City Deal should embrace (as it has begun to) SMART traffic management - ie demand led measures that can be altered as that demand changes.

# Question 4

Which junctions in your area need to be improved to increase safety for people cycling, and how what can be done to fix them?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

Mitcham’s Corner is not ideal for cyclists, neither is Elizabeth Way Roundabout. I’d like to see a greenway connecting north and south parts of the city. I worked alongside Transport Planners in my career as a Designer/Town Planner. In East London, I project managed a scheme to deliver a new connection to the Cycle Super Highway linking Barking to Westminster as part of the regeneration of the Olympic Borough.

In Cambridge I envisage a network of segregated cycleways connecting Midsummer Common via Mitcham’s Corner and the Cam Tow Path via Elizabeth Way. Cycling is so popular here it offers us one of the best opportunities to reduce air pollution; the least we can do is ensure those choosing to cycle are able to breath the fresh air they help create.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

Nearly all of them!

The Water Lane/HighStreet/Green End Road junction still needs improvement. It needs a fundamental redesign, although for those going to the science park, better signage directing cyclists down an improved halingway, through the new station would be a safer route.

Turning right from Milton Road into Gilbert Road is problematic, and should be made easier for cyclists.

I’ve talked about Mitcham’s Corner in later answers.

The Union Lane/Milton Road junction needs making safer, as much as for pedestrians as cyclists.

# Question 5

With Park Street due for demolition, and Grand Arcade cycle park frequently beyond capacity, where do you think a third covered city centre cycle park should be located? What other additional actions do you propose to increase cycle parking capacity on our city centre streets?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

It’s important to encourage cycle journeys connecting with other modes of transport so my preferred location for future covered cycle parking would be on highway land at interchanges such as bus-stops, train stations and along the guided busway.

The County Council controls a lot of this type of land so extra bike parking is feasible, recognising as an elected Councillor, I would need to apply pressure for the delivery of an appropriate capital programme. The funding, recently announced in the Department for Transport’s Walking and Cycling Strategy 2017, needs to find its way in to such schemes.

It will be important to ensure County Council cycle funding is ring-fenced. In the current climate of government cutbacks (Central Government funding for the County Council is reducing to £0 by the year 2020) as much additional funding as possible needs to be made available through development agreements and other private sources of funding; as well as by working in partnership with the City Deal Board.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

Mitcham's Corner wouod be a great location - especially if we are to redesign it to be a more people friendly space (see answer below).

I’d also like to see more smaller covered racks around the city.

# Question 6

What measures would you support to boost cycle commuting into Cambridge? For instance, the City Deal Greenways proposal, reuse of old railway alignments, or new bridges over main roads?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

Educating people about the advantages of cycling would be a measure I would support to boost cycle commuting into Cambridge. We have the ideal way, given the national programme of cycling proficiency education being rolled out now in schools but this should extend to adults through publicity programmes, to try to deliver the modal shift. We should all be aware cycling improves fitness and reduces the risk of heart disease, lessens the burden on health services and reduces pollution.

I also support the plan-led process so employment and housing sites are in areas of Cambridge that are accessible and there are more transport interchanges allowing people to cycle part-way if possible.
Planning policy teams, such that I worked in during my career in local government, have a crucial role to play in ensuring development is sustainable, i.e. managed to prevent excessive reliance on private transport. The Bus Services Bill currently being taken through parliament by MP Daniel Zeichner, will help to achieve these aims, crucially giving local authorities devolved powers to make better public transport provision decisions and plan more effectively for growth. It will help the situation by reducing the number of vehicles and create more space for cycling.

Kevin Price, Labour’s candidate for Mayor in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, has also pledged to invest in rail links with Network Rail, reducing the pressure on our road network, making it more attractive for cyclists. Making arterial roads safer and better managed, would help boost cycle commuting into Cambridge.

Cycling will be increased when we have improved infrastructure to encourage less confident cyclists like myself. Currently there are too many parts of the City where provision is fragmented and the number of hazards is too great because of the conflict created by different types of road use. Full segregation is the ideal and where this is not possible, alternative quieter routes like the Chisholm Trail should be developed, utilising railway sidings and other exiting corridors.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

The City Deal Greenways idea I support, but I have serious doubts about how well the implementation will be done, based one the current Labour/Conservative administration current projects.

Bikes being allowed onto trains is a key thing, especially with the new train station –t hey should be allowed at peak times, with extra space allocated to allow this.

I fully support the Chisholm Trail and Vice Chair its liaison forum.

Where possible, road space should be reallocated to allow wide, fully segregated, cycle lanes.

# Question 7

What improvements for cycling would you like to see at Mitcham's Corner?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

Motor traffic dominates Mitcham’s Corner. Cyclists are required to use a combination of road and pavement, shared with pedestrians.

I understand the needs of elderly, young people, mothers with push-chairs and disabled people; from delivering public realm projects as a regeneration specialist in local government and as the Equalities Officer in UNISON. I am aware of the serious hazards that can be caused by poor layouts and surface treatments, especially for blind people. The correct application of tactile paving, well designed crossings, and well maintained surfaces are all crucial to creating safe, well used public spaces. I don’t agree with experimental design. I would want to see clear segregation of cyclists and I am not in favour of shared space in busy city centre locations. Removing the gyratory system at Mitcham’s Corner would be a big step forward. The space that is released should be used to improve leisure provision.

Parking spaces near to shops are precious, helping to ensure those businesses thrive and disabled people have good accessibility. In some places at Mitcham’s Corner, additional bike parking spaces could be provided without reducing the number of car parking spaces. Elsewhere, a switch-over to more bicycle parking is something I would encourage.

I would also encourage this at locations such as the Tescos Metro Store in Chesterton High Street. Fewer cars parked outside the store would assist visibility for all road users, and create a safer place for pedestrians to cross. Landscaped greenways and tree-lined avenues could be all-the-more successful as a result.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

It needs to be more of a space for people, which will increase the profitability of local businesses, and in turn this will make it more cycle friendly.

Currently Labour Councillors have said that a limit of £3-4 million will be offered from the City Deal. This is paltry funding for an area that needs a massive re-design.

Any redesign should include extensive trailing of the effects of reducing traffic in various directions or lanes, in order to allocate more space to pedestrians and cyclists. Physical segregation should be the key, all of which is testable with ground level modelling.

We should not accept a situation that doesn’t try various different solutions to see if the wider road network can cope with re-allocation of road space.

# Question 8

What improvements for cycling would you like to see on Milton Road?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kelley GREEN
(Labour Party)

I’d strive to achieve the improvements contained in the ‘Do Optimum’ proposal, including dual cycleways. The Local Liaison Forum was a successful way of bringing these ideas to the forefront gaining the support of all the Councillors and Residents Groups. The cycling improvements contained in that community proposal have considerable weight going forward, which I will continue emphasising to all concerned.

Stephen LAWRENCE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Connor MACDONALD
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Ian MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

Priority over road junctions, both legal and physical.

The cutting back of bushes on blind corners, to allow visibility of incoming cars of cycles, and of cycles to see out coming cars.

Trailing of some of the Dutch style round about designs proposed by the cycle campaign.

More trees: green features have been shown to calm traffic and create a more pleasant environment for everyone.

Any improvements do need broad support – which is what was so pleasing about the work that the Cycle Campaign did with local Residents’ Associations.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.