Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council 2017: Arbury

Summary: Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council, May 2017
Polling date: Thursday 4th May 2017
Division:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Henry COLLINS  (Conservative Party)
  • Cecilia LISZKA  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Lucas RUZOWITSKY  (Green Party)
  • Jocelynne SCUTT  (Labour Party)

Questions for Arbury division candidates (8 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

# Question 1

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do for yourself?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

Cycling is mine and my partner’s primary mode of transport for everything from commuting, to shopping, socialising, sport and leisure. We both preferentially use a bike/ train combination when travelling long distance whether for work or leisure. I use a hybrid bike for getting around town, and a touring bike for longer sport or leisure rides. All of the above means that I have a very extensive personal experience of cycling on different bikes, on different types of roads, wearing different clothes, and for different purposes and a great understanding of what matters to cyclists and how we are viewed by other road users.

I have also been involved in a collision with a car which, whilst not stopping me cycling, has made me even more aware of road design, cycling infrastructure and how other road users behave. Despite being a confident cyclist, I know how dangerous roads can be if cyclists are not considered at all times in road and transport planning.

I do not have children myself, but I live close to a number of schools and pass two on my way to work every day, so I am familiar with the type of activity surrounding schools and how important it is to have adequate measures in place to encourage young people and their parents to cycle and to enable them to do so safely. I have encouraged less confident friends and family members to take up occasional cycling by guiding them on routes, and have friends with children that I would like to encourage to ride bikes from a young age, and this has really helped me see cycling from the perspective of a new or nervous cyclist. Conversations with them have given me great insight into what may be off-putting for younger, nervous or frailer cyclists.

For older people, if they already cycle, my concerns centre around convenient bike parking, transport links and maintaining good road surfaces; if they do not but would like to for health or other reasons, my main concern is perception and training. I would like to develop an initiative to offer basic road training, and guided rides to new cyclists to dispel any worries and equip them with good safety skills.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

I have cycled since a child, learning in a country town in Western Australia with my elder sister. I cycled to and from home to the Australian Institute of Criminology and the High Court of Australia in Canberra, ACT, daily in summer (wonderful) and winter (freezing) months and the between seasons. In Cambridge I cycled daily when up at Girton in the 1970s, and when Visiting Fellow at Lucy Cavendish (2010-2011) also ... although less frequently in recent times as I travel by X5 three/four times a week which means (because of location) walking to and from the bus stop is dictated. My siblings have all cycled although not as regularly as I due to location (USA, London, etc for example), similarly with other relatives.

# Question 2

What challenges do people face in your area that prevent them from cycling, especially children and those using cycling as a mobility aid, and how will you address them?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

I have addressed many of these points in other answers so will remain brief here. In summary, for children I believe in initiatives to get them cycling safely as early as possible, and to ally this with schemes for parents who may not be cyclists themselves and may be nervous about their children starting. For those who use cycling as a mobility aid, safety and infrastructure is absolutely the key issue and identifying priority routes that provide this would be something I would like to address.

For those where safety or lack of confidence is the barrier, I would like to see the availability of cycle training and guided routes. For everyone, better road surfaces and more sensitively and holistically designed infrastructure are vital.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

Challenges: safety, primarily - cycleways and dual footpaths, potholes and uneven pavements, poor marking of dual use, kerbs, narrow roads (for example, Arbury Road), motor traffic, (poor) lighting, security for bikes, (lack of) secure, convenient or covered parking, cycle theft

I encourage cycling to school - recognising that this means streets must be safe particularly for young children cycling - where there are dual use pavements and where, albeit there are cyclepaths, children are not confident cycling on them (say Gilbert Road). In this, my work as Chair of Milton Road Local Liaison Forum (LLF) on the Milton Road project is key: working with residents and residents associations and Matthew Danish of CamCycle, the LLF has put together a Do Optimum proposal and resolutions that are being modelled by City Deal officers. We (residents' associations, residents and councillors) have worked solidly on this to ensure that cyclist interests are affirmed, bearing in mind various demographics - children in particular. As a member of Nth Area Cttee I worked with fellow councillors (lead Councillor in this effort being Cllr Gerri Bird) to gain dropped kerbs which facilitate cyclists in all categories - children, those with a disability, etc.
As a member of the Highways & Community Infrastructure Cttee I am lobbying for redistribution of the fund for roadways and footpaths, so that Cambridge footpaths receive more funding to make them safe - that is, even pavement and fixing pavement and bitumen raised by tree roots. I have asked for freshening of paint-markings on dual use footpaths however my advice is that this will not be done until the footpaths/pavements are fixed, hence (and for straightforward safety reasons) my endeavour to gain more footpath/pavement funding.
I worked with residents in relation to the reconfiguration of lighting under the Balfour Beattie contract, holding a public meeting at Milton Road Library (attended by more than 50 residents), inviting officers from BB and working with residents managed to have lighting arrangements along many roads reconfigured to the wishes of residents (for safety). With the County Labour team I opposed the cutting of lighting and supported the campaign to reinstate them: this resulted in reversal of the cutting of lighting and together with the City Council providing funding for extension of proper lighting from 10pm to 2pm, this works in favour of safety for cyclists (and pedestrians) although most/many acknowledge that part of the problem lies in the distance between the light poles - unfortunately a consequence of the County Council's granting the contract to BB.
As regards using cycling as a mobility aid, I consider it is vital amongst other matters to ensure there is proper accommodation on streets/roads and secure parking for cycles which are configured for use by persons with a disability. I would work with CamCycle and disability organisations on this issue.
more needs to be done.
As a barrister admitted to practice in all Australian states and territories, I represented many persons with a disability in discrimination claims and bring this experience to bear on my work in Cambridge and on the County Council. I am a strong advocate for the rights of persons with a disability and recognise that one best acts in their interests by paying attention to their own articulation of the issues confronting them in mobility terms (whether as cyclists or using other means of mobility - scooters, wheelchairs) and supporting them. This I have done in that it is the proper way for an advocate to represent clients and it is a practice in which I continue to engage as a County Councillor and if re-elected would continue to do so.
As Anti-Discrimination Commissioner in one of Australia's states I worked for five years administering the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998 (Tas.) with a significant part of that work relating to disability discrimination and my experience and learning in that role in working with, assessing claims of, and promoting through training the interests of persons with a disability means that I have developed a capacity to represent these interests would continue to do so in consultation with disability groups and individuals.
In my present University teaching role in Constitutional & Administrative Law I lecture that part of the curriculum addressing human rights and have specifically incorporated disability discrimination and human rights and in doing so recognise the importance of being aware and promoting disability rights including mobility by cycle and other means. This I incorporate into all my work.

# Question 3

Which aspects of current City Deal proposals do you support, and what additional measures which have not been officially proposed do you think should be explored?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the measures already touched upon later in this survey, notably the Greenways Proposal and Chisholm Trail, although I do not think that the City Deal has gone far enough to encourage a modal shift in the direction of more sustainable transport in general. In particular, the Histon and Milton Road schemes have not adequately dealt with cycling and walking, and as a result are prioritising bus and car traffic. I would like to see these reconsidered and would push for this.

I do not believe there was adequate consultation on the proposals and, therefore feel that it will not benefit from public support once activity commences. For this to be a project that provides benefit long into the future, it has to be much more ambitious in considering the growth in population in and around the city in years to come, and to plan ahead to cope with the demands on transport that will inevitably follow. In particular, Tranche 1 activity has to lay the foundations on which later tranches can build, rather than closing off opportunities too early in, simply to spend the money quickly. One idea that I would like to see explored a lot more seriously is the light railway.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

The 'Do Optimum' for Milton Road - endorsed as Resolution 1 and incorporated in other resolutions of Milton Road Local Liaison Forum, and 'Do everything' - endorsed in the Histon Road LLF resolutions incorporate proposals for ensuring cycling and pedestrian safety along these two major roadways. As Chair of Milton Road LLF I have supported 'Do Optimum' and all the resolutions of the LLF and continue to do so. I have worked to ensure that they are taken into account and modelled by officers. I support the resolutions of Histon Road LLF and will work to have them taken into account as I have worked vis-à-vis the Milton Road resolutions.
One idea raised by a resident during canvassing and which I consider has merit is that of Park & Cycle - establishing secure parking for cycles at Park & Ride sites, so that these sites can be used by cyclists coming from villages, leaving their cycles safe and secure (say parking 'sheds' accessible by electronic access cards) and taking the bus into Cambridge and back. This is an idea worth exploring.

# Question 4

Which junctions in your area need to be improved to increase safety for people cycling, and how what can be done to fix them?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

Mitcham’s Corner is the most prominent junction within the new Arbury division that requires improvement, as discussed elsewhere. Accident data made publically available by Cambridgeshire County Council supports this being the junction with the highest number of accidents, although a number of accidents are also reported at the Gilbert Road/ Histon Road junction, which is borne out by my own experience of using this junction twice every day on my commute.

Measures to improve these junctions have been partially addressed in other sections, but I would also welcome the opportunity to look in more detail at the causes of accidents and to consult with local residents and business owners, regular road users of all modes, and the council, to put forward a sensible proposal of improvements.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

The junctions along Histon Road and Milton Road, as explored in the resolutions of Histon Road LLF and Milton Road LLF need attention as proposed in 'Do Optimum' and 'Do Everything' and the resolutions of these LLFs. The Lensfield Road/Fen Causeway is notoriously dangerous - and my experience as a cyclist bears this out: I lived in that area for a number of years and cycled Trumpington Road frequently: most times I alighted at this junction (whether coming or going) and walked across the crosswalk on Fen Causeway or took the Brookside route.
I would not presume to propose what can be done to fix intersections that are dangerous for cyclists, save as to say that it is necessary to consult with those having expertise in the area, and as Chair of the Milton Road LLF and attending session of Histon Road LLF I have appreciated the contribution of CamCycle through Matthew Danish and consider that this expertise should be incorporated into discussion and solutions for changing such intersections for safety.
In this regard, I supported a proposal for funding under the Local Highways Initiative (LHI) to address the intersection of Carlyle Road and Chesterton Lane/Road and Jesus Locke Bridge. The proposal originally was directed toward providing a cycle crossing next to the pedestrian crossing however advice was received that this would be potentially even more dangerous due to cyclists coming from the Jesus Locke direction and into the path of motorists. I therefore proposed that the bid be modified to gain funding to explore ways of making this intersection safe. This bid is on the list although not yet approved. I aim to promote it in the upcoming round.

# Question 5

With Park Street due for demolition, and Grand Arcade cycle park frequently beyond capacity, where do you think a third covered city centre cycle park should be located? What other additional actions do you propose to increase cycle parking capacity on our city centre streets?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

I passionately think that we need to re-think the way we approach cycle parking in Cambridge. The city is so well-known for its cycling culture, yet trying to find parking in and around the city is woeful. Part of the answer has to be to use existing spaces better, including working with local shops and businesses to identify underused spaces in basements or backs of stores, where secure bike parking could be put in.

Another part is to redesign on-street cycle parking. An initiative currently gaining traction in London uses bike hangars e.g. https://southwarkcyclists.org.uk/cycle-parking-guide/ and https://www.cyclehoop.rentals/about/ and I would like to work with the council to develop this both as an idea for private residential storage but also council provision in the city centre.

I would also encourage the reallocation of some car parking spaces to bike parking spaces, especially in areas of high housing density and low internal space.

In terms of large-scale bike parks, I think that the one at Cambridge Station has been a great success and I would like to see this replicated for the North Cambridge Station. However, these are too far out of town to be useful for the city centre cyclists. I find the Post Office Terrace proposal appealing and would like to consider it in more detail. I would also like to consider an integrated approach that brings more people into the city on the Park & Ride (by scrapping the fee) and other bus services, thus reducing demand for car park spaces in existing car parks. The reallocation of some of these spaces to bike spaces would provide additional capacity without the need for new infrastructure.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

All cycle parking needs to be safe and secure - for cycles, cyclists and others using the streets where cycles are parked. Every planning application for multiple occupancy - say student accommodation, ApartHotels, etc must incorporate adequate parking for cycles. City Deal proposals for more Park & Ride means that fewer cars will come into Cambridge City meaning in turn that there will be more space for cycle parking. Shops, restaurants and cafes should be encouraged to provide cycle parking where this does not impede pedestrian traffic. Consideration can be given to exploring the potential for expansion of the Grand Arcade space for cycles, and employers can be encouraged to provide cycle parking on their premises - planning provision for cycle parking with office space needs to be considered and encouraged.

# Question 6

What measures would you support to boost cycle commuting into Cambridge? For instance, the City Deal Greenways proposal, reuse of old railway alignments, or new bridges over main roads?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

For many people, commuting by bike is made difficult simply by the distances that people have to cover. Often, a lack of facilities at their destination is a key disincentive: inadequate parking; poor or lacking shower and changing facilities; and a requirement in many circumstances for smart business attire. Then there is the safety issue.

For those for whom a one-way trip of ~6 miles is enough, integrated transport has to improve, so that people can split their journey in an easy and quick way. Bike storage at strategic places along primary routes into the city, and closer working with public transport operators, would help to facilitate this. Similarly, engaging with some of the largest employers to provide or share facilities would go a long way to making the option of cycling to work more comfortable for many.

In terms of safety and improved infrastructure, I think ideas like the City Deal Greenways proposal and the Chisholm Trail are what we need, and I support the ambition of Camcycle to enhance standards before approval. I would also like the opportunity to discuss these ideas further with Camcyle, the council, and road safety and design experts so my position is fully informed, especially on areas I cycle infrequently.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

I support the Greenways proposals as providing cycling routes that are free of motor traffic, so creating safe space or cyclists. This is an important initiative for improving cyclist access to Cambridge City and linking centres outside the city.
A resident recently raised with me the issue of cycling out of the City toward Waterbeach - as he works there rather than in the city. His point was that most attention is being paid to cycling into the city and moving commuters into the city by means other than motorcars. I endorse his concern and look towards plans for a quality cycleway promoting movement out of the city as well as into it.
The inclusion of secure cycle parking at Cambridge Station is important and this must be replicated at Cambridge North and both stations need to improve and extend their parking for cycles, so as to encourage commuters to travel to stations by cycle rather than by car.
I support segregated cycle routes where these are possible and where dual use cycling./pedestrian traffic is provided for, there must be adequate, clear markings and signs to ensure that both cyclists and pedestrians are well aware that each has an entitlement to use of the pathway.

# Question 7

What improvements for cycling would you like to see at Mitcham's Corner?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

Mitcham’s Corner is a busy junction where buses, drivers and cyclists are constantly present, changing lanes and stop-starting around the shops. The current set-up is inefficient and at time dangerous, and the cut-through for cyclists does not provide a wholly continuous route from one side to the other.

I would like to see Mitcham’s Corner being incorporated into the next City Deal proposal so that solutions can be investigated that improve the area for cyclists and continue to enable to area to thrive as an important local commerce hub. I would ask for a full consultation to be carried out with local stakeholders including Camcycle, local businesses and regular users of the roads. I would want to properly consider options for pedestrianisation (whether partial or full) and to look in more detail at the proposals currently put forward by Camcycle, to investigate their feasibility and interaction with nearby roads and traffic.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

Mitcham's Corner is one of the most vital centres of Cambridge, with enormous community potential, but its vitality is intruded upon by its being a major traffic route. It is dangerous for pedestrians and cyclists alike. I support the proposals put forward by the City Council (plans by Glen Richardson formerly of the City Council) and ideas developed and promoted by Friends of Mitcham's Corner. The solution needs to take into account that this route serves traffic (buses and cars) and therefore an alternative needs to be found if the area is to become pedestrianised and include cyclists. As presently configured, more parking for cycles needs to be provided and a safer system of traffic lighting needs to be incorporated. I support the proposal that Mitcham's Corner be included in the next tranche of the City Deal and understand that some monies are or may be available for modelling now. If so, then I support this and recognise the importance of this modelling including attention being paid to safety for cyclists at this junction.

# Question 8

What improvements for cycling would you like to see on Milton Road?

Henry COLLINS
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Cecilia LISZKA
(Liberal Democrat)

Currently, Milton Road is rather a mish-mash for cyclists, with cycle lanes switching between road and pavement, and being shared with the bus lane. For such a busy primary road as Milton Road, I don’t feel this is appropriate as it leads to confusion amongst road users and pedestrians which can lead to dangerous situations arising.

Given the width of the road and pavement, I would like to see the cycle lanes more obviously separated from traffic or pedestrians, a measure that would not only protect cyclists but that would longer-term be an incentive for people wishing to cycle rather than drive, and reduce pressure on the roads such that bus journeys would also be more efficient. Considering the length of the road, I would also like to install a sizeable and secure bike park so that multi-modal (bus/ cycle) journeys become more attractive.

I support the ‘Do-Optimum’ scheme which looks to have been comprehensively considered. I would also like to consider in more detail the potential for more zebra crossings to slow traffic and allow pedestrians to cross safely, as well as the use of junctions with Advanced Stop Lines, with traffic light timings set to an appropriate length of time, to allow priority for bikes at key junctions.

Lucas RUZOWITSKY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

As chair of Milton Road LLF I supported and continue to support the 'Do Optimum' proposal through resolution 1 of the LLF and as incorporated into additional resolutions of the LLF.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.