Elections

Local elections, May 2007: Trumpington

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2007.
Polling date: Thursday 3rd May 2007
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Andy BLACKHURST  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY  (Green Party)
  • Peter Norman HASE  (Conservative Party)
  • Pamela Mary STACEY  (Labour Party)

Questions for Trumpington ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Cycling offers a huge opportunity to reduce motor traffic and free up road space. Do you have any suggestions for additional cycling promotion activities that the Council could do?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

One idea I’d like to explore with colleagues is for the Council to offer match-funding grants to businesses or institutions which install secure customer/visitor cycle-parking. If the governing legislation permits it, it seems to me that this would be a very appropriate use for the monies that accrue under Local Authority Parking Enforcement.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

Cambridge City Council could press the County Council to take all possible measures to reduce motorised traffic in its bounders and so to free more on -road space for cycle lanes etc. In London, Transport for London is now funding transport 'advisors' to persuade residents in certain areas to cycle or use public transport with positive inducements e.g. free lights, cycle route maps, reduced transport pass etc. The city council could promote cycling to children by starting after school cycle clubs and also have officers to promote cycling in schools and in businesses. (Further ideas for city council role in promoting cycling in later questions)

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

Fully endorse better cycle lane lighting, more focus to stop parking on cycle lanes and the use of CCTV to reduce cycle theft. Please see the answers to Question 6 below.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

I think peolple have to feel safe to cycle, so more wide cycle lanes where there is a good space between you and the bus. Off road ones must be well maintained and good lighting is essential.

# Question 2

Cambridge suffers from a huge shortage of on-street public cycle parking, and a staggeringly high rate of cycle theft - 10% of reported crime. We want to see a formal strategy to get on-street cycle parking provided around Cambridge, with a target of say, 100-200 spaces per year initially. Do you support this?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

See above! We do need greater provision of proper cycle-parking, both to minimise potential inconvenience to other pavement users, and to reduce the instance of cycle theft, which is all too familiar. I am pleased to note, though, that the police report that levels of cycle theft have declined compared to previous years.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

We support your call for additional on-street bike racks in the city. The cycle-parking at Cambridge Station and at Drummer Street require upgrading with better facilities and more space. The city generally needs more cycle parking facilities in the centre. We support Cambridge Cycle Campaign's opposition to the redevelopment of Lion Yard on the grounds of inadequate cycle parking provision. Single wheel stands should be phased out as soon as possible and the city council could promote cycling to businesses by researching a range of suitable cycle parking stands and lock up facilities. Then consult the public about which they find the most suitable before implementing action. They could offer advice and fast track planning applications to businesses that want to increase cycle parking selling stands to small businesses at cost price. Covered cycle parking where possible as well as variety of lock up methods would be beneficial.

Cycle theft may be 'casual' or part of organised crime. All cyclists need to be 'theft aware' and to use sturdy locks etc. Anyone using an expensive bike might expect it to be targeted and double or triple lock as Londoners do. Those who want quick locking and willing to take more risks might use the Dutch system. Local police and bike groups could advise and explain options for different methods and outline risk and offer information on where to purchase options. However good cycle parking should help reduce this crime. There is a need for more 24 hour secure cycle parking that is cheap because when cycling is the main form of transport leaving a bike at a station or a coach stop for a weekend or longer is risky.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

Interesting picture of Bateman St, looks like its about 5 doors down from my house! I agree with your point for parking bays or proper secure (undercover) parking for cycles. Our recent survey of anti-social behaviour showed more than 40% of respondents had suffered petty crime in the last 12 months, much of which is cycle theft.

If we can select where the parking bays should be - and near the Eurocentre in Bateman St would be a good place to start - I would support this approach.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

Yes, all cyclists recognise the problem of not having a safe and convenient place to leave their bike. If you go shopping or say to the theatre you wonder will my bike still be there on my return and also will it still be in a good condition.

# Question 3

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a police priority?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

Obstructive parking has been one of the priority policing issues identified for the South Area, and I look forward to hearing feedback on how that is progressing at future South Area Committee meetings. Obviously, one has to balance competing demands on police resources, but cyclists riding without lights are certainly a danger to themselves and others.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I support more training for cyclists from school age upwards to use the roads safely, especially for those who have never taken a driving test. It is important to act appropriately when cycling on joint use paths to protect pedestrians. Aggressive cycle path on and off road in never acceptable. Cycling without lights must be avoided on roads and cycle paths, as it is unsafe. Law enforcement is best used to deter cyclists who are insensitive to the needs of others and there are times when their approach should be flexible. For instance Cambridge City Council has made use of paths for cyclist in a creative joint usage. However there are times when it is difficult to determine were joint use starts and finishes e.g. Brooklands Ave. I’m concerned that cyclists will be penalised where joint use is unclear and this may put nervous cyclist off using cycle paths.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

Yes. I fully endorse safe cycling and no lights is dangerous. I cycle at night and have learned to clip the lights to my person so I dont forget them on the bike. I would favour a Police warning scheme but better still, we should try to find a way for bike lights to be issued with sponsorship from local Cambridge business.

Using our footpaths is often ebcause the cyclist has no lights and in real terms is anti-social behaviour. We all do it but if we had better bike lane markings and better lighting, this could be reduced.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

I think more should be done to promote considerate use of paths and it is annoying when a cyclist comes towards you at speed when it is a pedrestrian-only pavement. I am sure most cyclists are sensible but as with all things the bad ones give the rest a bad name. The ones who completely ignore red lights, go across the road and end up facing the oncoming traffic just to avoid going around a roundabout, pull out onto the main road from the cycle path without bothering to look and seem to think they have their own protection shield so do not need lights. Likewise I can see no good reason why drivers think they have the right to block the cycle lane, they are not parking bays. If there was more enforcement then hopefully it would be of benefit for all users.

# Question 4

Following the remarkable success of 20 mph zones in Hull, we wish to see many more 20 mph zones around Cambridge for both safety and environmental reasons. Do you support this objective?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

Local Liberal Democrats have previously advocated wider use of 20 mph zones in Cambridgeshire, including within Cambridge. Within the ward, I am pleased that we have been able to secure traffic calming measures for Coronation Street, and would be interested to hear resident’s views on the idea of creating a “Homezone” within Newtown. Homezone features have been incorporated with success into recent new developments in Cambridge: it ought to be possible, if there is sufficient public support for it, to extend the principle to an established neighbourhood such as Newtown.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

We do support this in fact Lancaster Green Councillors have gained cross-party support for this motion. Speed reduction for traffic to 20 miles on hour would make cycling more pleasant and save many lives. However the restriction would require cycle friendly speed humps to slow drivers and better enforcement. Bus drivers need special training to use these areas and bus companies to allow for slower journey times. Where there is currently a 30 mile an hour limit on Trumpington St drivers frequently exceed this and it can be frightening cycling on the on-road cycle lane, which is very narrow. Especially when park and ride bus pass.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

Yes. But not just for the benefit of cyclists. I have a car and two motocycles and really do understand road use from all angles. We all drive too fast and the danger to the public - on foot as well as on cycles - is much worse speeds above 30 mph. In my view, the City centre should be a 20 mph zone and I agree with your Newsletter other than the wider area that you propose would be hard to Police and (I expect) costly to implement. I would advovcate starting with the City.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

Not certain how well this would work as Cambridge is often at a standstill so there are not that many chances to do 20 mph. I think it is more important to have good cycle paths and lanes. For example many cyclists go to great lenghs to avoid cycling over Hills Road bridge, as they do not feel safe and this is a space issue not a speed one. Likewise the traffic lights at the Catholic church can be a challenge for even the most experienced cyclists when cars race towards them.

# Question 5

We favour the removal of car parking on at least one side of Trumpington Road outside the Botanic Gardens. The current lanes are against government policy, as they are in the 'dooring zone'. Our proposal would allow wider cycle lanes and a buffer zone to protect cyclists from opened car doors . Do you support this?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

Being myself neither a car-driver nor a cyclist, I spoke with cycling friends about this, and found that they reacted very differently to this proposal. Clearly it is a complex issue, and one I need to discuss more widely.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I support this proposal. I would like to see a raised cycle path on the same side as the botanic gardens and better separation between cyclists and pedestrians on the cycle path on other side of the road in order to better protect pedestrians in this area of joint use. The parking ban would be most effective on the opposite side to the gardens as car drivers tend to get out of cars onto the pavement, unaware that cyclists may be coming behind them.
Part two of question re: wider cycle lanes and buffer zones
Yes. This is Green Party policy in Cambridge and is in our Manifesto for Cambridge

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

This is again right on my doorstep and I fully understand your points. I am not in favour of the removal of the parking - mainly because the Botanic Gardens and surrounding area are key sites for visitors and they need to park somewhere. The isssue of a "dooring zone" affects motobikes too by the way. I favour the Hull example and would hope that this could be provided in the Trumpington Road area.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

This is something I have never understood, perhaps the people who came up with the idea never cycle. Only yesterday I saw a cyclist having to pull out into the traffic out of the 'safety' of the cycle lane as a door was being opened. As you will see I have already made comments about the need for wider cycle lanes.

# Question 6

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points?

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

Only to comment on the invaluable work that the Cycling Campaign does in relation to planning issues. Colleagues have frequently commented how useful they find the Campaign’s “expert” comments. They are much appreciated!

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

A. Road use is set up to favour Drivers and without adequate public transport it can be unsafe to walk home alone especially for women. The most common feedback for women driving is that it’s unsafe to go out at night. Cycling is a really safe alternative for women and since becoming a cyclist in my 20’s I have not had the unsolicited attention that I had when I was a pedestrian. Therefore I believe it is important to maximise cycling opportunities for women and all vulnerable groups
2. In areas where there are no cycle paths this may mean many children and nervous cyclists will not cycle. More safe use of shared of paths must be considered until we have more government funding for a better and more adequate cycling infrastructure.
3. The council have made good use of a number of contraflow cycle paths in the city however there are more areas where this would cut down having to a long round to get to your destination so further attention should be paid to other options.
4. People with limited funds often struggle to maintain bike effectively I would like encourage more opportunities for cycle clubs in school and funding for maintenance classes for adults. Some inner city councils and schools have purchased bikes to loan to children from poorer families and run bike clubs to increase usage if cycling especially girls.
If elected, I would use my authority as a councillor to raise all issues in relation to increasing cycle use and safety.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

I would suggest a Safe Cycling Charter. I see so many people riding cylces that clearly have never read the highway code and perhaps (because they come from abroad) have no way to learn our rules of the road. If your body issued a Safe Cycling Charter, covering the right way to behave at traffic lights and crossings; the use of the footpaths; proper lights; security etc - the whole City would benefit and we can maybe save some people getting hurt. Could this be done with sponsorship and perhaps with the endorsement of the City Council? I for one would fully support this and hope if elected to be able to help you.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

It's strange you should send this to me as it arrived on the first day I had cycled in a very long time. I had the problem of trying to find somewhere to park in the centre and once I had struggled with locking my bike I found I had oil over my hands. There is never enough space. I used to cycle every day but I really don't enjoy it partly because I had an accident by catching the kerb and have the scars to prove it. The stands at work are so close together there is not enough space and I always end up with a pedal or handlebar in the way. Weather permitting I walk to work across the field but I have seen the result of two cycling accidents when the ambulance was needed so it is not only roads which have the problems. In addition a lot of money was spent impoving the cycle path in Long Road but why leave the muddy grass verge? The path is not wide enough and cyclists end up in the mud and fall off. To end I must tell you I know about your campaign as I was the cycle co-ordinator for my department when I worked for the University in the City centre. I know it is a struggle to get things done.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.