Elections

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Question 7 - we asked:

Cycling offers a huge opportunity to reduce motor traffic and free up road space. Do you have any suggestions for additional cycling promotion activities that the Council could do?

We asked this question in all 15 wards, namely: Abbey, Arbury, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, East Chesterton, Histon & Impington, King's Hedges, Market, Newnham, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Romsey, Trumpington, West Chesterton.

30 of the 67 candidates (45%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Ensuring there is sufficient transport infrastructure for all types of road users to accompany new developments is one of the local Conservatives' key planning priorities. We would work with the County Council and undertake a complete audit of cycle lane routes - identifying gaps in provision, underused lanes and dangerous pathways. Signage of city cycle routes can be confusing and poorly maintained. This needs to be improved.

The recent East Cambridge Transport strategy identifies a number of possible improvements to existing cycle infrastructure at relatively low cost, for example upgrading the Tins path. This could be done regardless of the unwanted plans for developing the airport site.

Donald Fisher DOUGLAS
(Conservative Party)

Ensuring there is sufficient transport infrastructure for all types of road users to accompany new developments is one of our key planning priorities. We would work with the County Council and undertake a complete audit of cycle lane routes – identifying gaps in provision, underused lanes and dangerous pathways. Signage of city cycle routes can be confusing and poorly maintained. This needs to be improved.

The recent East Cambridge Transport strategy identifies a number of possible improvements to existing cycle infrastructure at relatively low cost, for example upgrading the Tins path. This could be done regardless of the unwanted plans for developing the airport site.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

Fully endorse better cycle lane lighting, more focus to stop parking on cycle lanes and the use of CCTV to reduce cycle theft. Please see the answers to Question 6 below.

Christopher John HOWELL
(Conservative Party)

The key area of opportunity for the City Council is in the planning system when looking at new developments.

I would seek to ensure the planning system makes cycle parking and new cycle routes happen, particularly on the large new developments proposed for the south and east of Cambridge and Northstowe. For example, I think it is a scandal that a settlement the size of Cambourne was permitted with such poor cycle links to nearby Cambridge, the Councils must not allow this to happen again. Ensuring there is sufficient transport infrastructure for all types of road users to accompany new developments is one of our key planning priorities, and should go above all the other punitive obligations the Council seeks to impose on developers before granting planning permission, as it is currently the first thing to be dropped from the obligations (e.g. a new footbridge to the station was in the original plan for the Cambridge Leisure site).

I would also like to see the cycling improvements proposed in the East Cambridge Transport strategy that can be achieved at relatively low cost (e.g. upgrading the Tins path) made regardless of whether the main development of the airport (which I don’t support) goes ahead, subject to identifying a suitable source of funding.

Outside the planning process, I am generally supportive of measures by the relevant Councils to improve the convenience of cycling, for example, given the opportunity I would have voted to oppose the City Centre bike ban at every opportunity, to make streets such as Kingston Street 2 way for cyclists and remove obstructions to cycle routes (cow-handles?).

As a Councillor in Cherry Hinton 2000-2004, I campaigned unsuccessfully for review and replacement of the traffic calming there – amongst other concerns, the cycle lanes are ridiculous in terms of using for cycling. I also campaigned for safety measures to be introduced when new restricted visibility bus shelters were installed on dual use paths, and would expect to follow up similar issues in Coleridge if elected there.

James Andrew MARTIN
(Conservative Party)

All too often, infrastrucutre trails behind the needs of new developments. Therefore, we aim to ensure high quality transport infrastructure for all types of road users to accompany new developments is one of our key planning priorities. We would work with the County Council and undertake a complete audit of cycle lane routes, identifying gaps in provision, underused lanes and dangerous pathways. Signage of city cycle routes can be confusing and poorly maintained. this must get better.

Furthermore, the recent East Cambridge Transport strategy identifies a number of possible improvements to existing cycle infrastructure at relatively low cost, a notable example being upgrading the Tins path. This could be done regardless of the unwanted plans for developing the airport site.

Richard Edward NORMINGTON
(Conservative Party)

Yes, planning issues are a Conservative priority. I believe that we should ensure that there is sufficient transport infrastructure for all types of road users to accompany new developments. We would work with the county council and undertake a complete audit of cycle lane routes: identifying gaps in provision, underused lanes and dangerous pathways.

The recent East Cambridge Transport strategy identifies a number of possible improvements at relatively low cost. This could be done regardless of the unwanted plans for developing the airport site.

Hamish George DOWNER
(Green Party)

Cambridge City Council could press the County Council to take all possible measures to reduce motorised traffic and so to free more on -road space for cyle lanes etc.

In London, Transport for London is now funding transport 'advisors' to persuade residents in certain areas to cycle or use public transport with positive inducements e.g. free lights, cycle route maps, reduced transport pass etc.

Ceri Barbara GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

Cambridge City Council could press the County Council to take all possible measures to reduce motorised traffic in its bounders and so to free more on -road space for cycle lanes etc. In London, Transport for London is now funding transport 'advisors' to persuade residents in certain areas to cycle or use public transport with positive inducements e.g. free lights, cycle route maps, reduced transport pass etc. The city council could promote cycling to children by starting after school cycle clubs and also have officers to promote cycling in schools and in businesses. (Further ideas for city council role in promoting cycling in later questions)

Jesse Liam GRIFFITHS
(Green Party)

I think promotion or 'marketing' of cycling (and walking and public transport) has been shown time and again (mostly in other countries unfortunately!) to have significant potential for encouraging modal shift away from the car. Sustrans have been promoting the 'Travelsmart' individualised marketing programme since 2001, an approach which is commonly used in other countries and has an excellent track record. Working with students and parents around Safe routes to schools shemes should be a major priority for Cambridge, given the large congestion effects of the school run. In London, Transport for London is now funding transport 'advisors' to persuade residents in certain areas to cycle or use public transport with positive inducements. These kinds of schemes should be used across Cambridge.

Stephen Roger LAWRENCE
(Green Party)

Folding bikes on Buses and Trains for people with longer commutes (I think there is some existing scheme of grants towards purchasing folding bikes)

Shayne Mary MITCHELL
(Green Party)

Much lower speed limit in reduced-traffic zone in city centre (Sidney St, etc) – 10 mph

Massively increase 20 mph zones (eg Mill Road), eventually leading to a 20 mph speed limit throughout city (with possible exception of main thoroughfares)

A strong pro-cycling campaign – ads on backs of buses, etc, to show cycling as the normal, obvious choice

Change the traffic culture in town from one in which aggressive and fast driving , and drivers treating cyclists carelessly and with contempt, are the norm

Start a loan/hire system for child seats, trailer bikes/trailers

Encourage/start car clubs

Join the “Slow City” movement

Pelican crossings – a very few change almost immediately, but most make people wait up to a minute. There is no reason they should not all change promptly.

Work with Stagecoach and Stagecoach drivers to stop current dangerous and aggressive bus driving practices

Stop always showing cyclists wearing cycle helmets in leaflets – it discourages cycling by giving the impression it is dangerous, and needs special equipment

Gregory Michael PATTON
(Green Party)

Both the City and County Councils should be involved in freeing more space for dedicated cycle lanes.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Cycle maintenance classes in schools. A cared for cycle is a valued cycle and complements the safer routes to school programme.

Margaret Elizabeth WRIGHT
(Green Party)

Cambridge City Council could press the County Council to take all possible measures to reduce motorised traffic and so to free more on -road space for cyle lanes etc. In London, Transport for London is now funding transport 'advisors' to persuade residents in certain areas to cycle or use public transport with positive inducements e.g. free lights, cycle route maps, reduced transport pass etc. Council could take similar initiatives in Cambridge.

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

It could be worth thinking of targeting car drivers, eg leaflets in car parks, benefits of cycling, etc. Park and bike scheme ? Also it would be helpful if the council paid more attention to the state of the road close to the kerb, as this is where broken glass, potholes etc tend to occur - making it more dangerous for cyclists.

Jonathan Hugh GOODACRE
(Labour Party)

I would love to see a cycling campaign, perhaps a 'Cambridge Cycling Month' which could have a variety of activites to encourage cycle use in the city. This could include a cycle race, sponsored cycle ride, information services like a cycle van at which you could get a bike 'check-up' and learn about the benefits of cycling and safety elements etc. It could be a collaboration between City and County Councils, South Cambs District Council, bike shops, police service, the Cycling Campaign and others within the city.

Aside from this, there is much that can be done through the provision of simple information about what is currently available in the city.

Tariq SADIQ
(Labour Party)

Certain streets or areas in the city could become car free zones on certain days of the year and reserved for cyclists and pedestrians. This might encourage those who are apprehensive about cycling to try it out in a safe environment. Also encourage more local businesses and employers to promote the Department of Transport's Cycle to Work scheme which gives tax breaks on the purchase of new bikes and spreads out the payments.

Pamela Mary STACEY
(Labour Party)

I think peolple have to feel safe to cycle, so more wide cycle lanes where there is a good space between you and the bus. Off road ones must be well maintained and good lighting is essential.

Lucy WALKER
(Labour Party)

1. For travellers into Cambridge: i) encourage employers to develop schemes to get their employees out of cars and onto bikes ii) promote use of park and rides with secure cycle parking and cycle routes into city.
2. Work with County Council to prioritise creation of safe cycle paths and linked cycle routes.
3. Promote fun, cycle-based leisure activities, including outings (linked to tourism?)
4. Contribute to cycle-promotional literature (working with the police, the County Council and cycle organisations and lobby groups eg. Camcycle and Sustrans).

Simon Richard Ainsley WATKINS
(Labour Party)

I'm no expert on this, but suggest further restriction of motor traffic, and, as far as possible segregation of motor traffic, cyclists & pedestrians to avoid conflict.

Andy BLACKHURST
(Liberal Democrat)

One idea I’d like to explore with colleagues is for the Council to offer match-funding grants to businesses or institutions which install secure customer/visitor cycle-parking. If the governing legislation permits it, it seems to me that this would be a very appropriate use for the monies that accrue under Local Authority Parking Enforcement.

Jonathan Peter CHATFIELD
(Liberal Democrat)

I agree that cycling provision should be considered in all major planning applications and any highways / transport modifications. Given the current focus on wellbeing and healthy living, cycling is an ideal activity for joined up promotional work between county and district councils.

Steven Robert COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

Actions speak louder than words and I think the best way to promote cycling is to improve facilities for cycling. So, for example, the fact that the city centre cycling ban has been overturned is a great step forward. Likewise, small changes such as replacing gates with cattle grids on the commons, make a big difference. Promotional campaigns emphasising the range of benefits from cycling are also very important and I would like to see a campaign that uses humour to persuade non-cyclists that it can be cool to cycle.

Mike DIXON
(Liberal Democrat)

This candidate has contacted the Campaign in response to the survey but has not given permission to make the response public.

Alan LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

My own employers provide secure cycle parking facilities and showers to encourage staff to cycle to work. The city council is already supporting similar measures through its membership of the Cambridgeshire Travel For Work partnership http://www.tfw.org.uk which operates an initiative called “Take a Stand”. I also want to explore other ways which the city council can encourage employers to make suitable provision for employees who cycle to work.

Michael Hal PITT
(Liberal Democrat)

I think one key thing the council can do to encourage cycle use is work to ensure a reasonable cycling environment. This means pressuring the county to repair the streets and make more sensible bike lane provision.

Another idea I have heard suggested by LibDem colleagues is to offer match-funding grants to businesses or institutions which install secure cycle-parking, perhaps funded from City Council parking fines.

Ed SEXTON
(Liberal Democrat)

Installing more cycle racks, particularly at congested locations such as the rail station and market square (possibly via S106 funding). Promoting the installation of more cycle racks by private employers. Making a minimum amount of cycle parking a requirement in all new developments. Considering the removal of remaining cycle restrictions (e.g. Burleigh St) as has been done in the city centre.

Julie Elizabeth SMITH
(Liberal Democrat)

I think it would be great if the Council could advocate 'safe cycling' to students when they arrive at the City's universities. At present, students are given lots of introductory talks; it would be great if we could outline the advantages of cycling (as well as some basic guidance on the rules of the road). Perhaps the Council's cycling maps of the City could be given to incoming students and to new Council taxpayers when they register.

Tania ZMURA
(Liberal Democrat)

The council could help and advice to businesses & organisations to install secure cycle-parking ie Bill Gates Building cycle park at Madingley Road.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Respect)

The biggest problem cambridge cyclists face is traffic. We are seeing both more cylcists and more traffic as Cambridge grows. There is need for much better cycle routes, cycle route signs and directions and cycle parking. However i belive that the best way to increase cycling is to reduce traffic and this needs to be done by increasing the size of the no car zones in the city centre, designating more free residents parking schemes, more no-through-routes and much much better and more intergrated public transport.

Marjorie Ruth Hadley BARR
(UK Independence Party)

I believe the best way to promote the benefits (and responsibilities) of cycling is through schools and colleges to encourage future generations of cyclists. It would be good thing if the City Council could give talks or distribute some literature in this way.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.