Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council 2017: Romsey

Summary: Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council, May 2017
Polling date: Thursday 4th May 2017
Division:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Simon COOPER  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Noel KAVANAGH  (Labour Party)
  • Simon LEE  (Conservative Party)
  • Caitlin PATTERSON  (Green Party)

Questions for Romsey division candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do for yourself?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

Both my wife and I cycle to work on a daily basis - I cycle to the West Cambridge site, and my wife to Addenbrooke's along the busy Perne and Mowbray Roads. We also regularly cycle into town, and enjoy occasional cycling trips to villages outside Cambridge.

Whilst we don't have any children ourselves, I'm aware of many issues that I hear from neighbours, friends, or from people on the doorstep. Whilst the cycle network in Cambridge is generally ok, there are still many places, especially around schools, that could be safer for children and other people who feel less confident cycling on busy roads.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

All four members of our family are regular cyclists. Our children began cycling early and used their bicycles to go to their primary and secondary schools. Cycling is our main mode of transport in the City and we are keen leisure cyclists.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

Neither myself or partner own a car, subsequently we are both dependent on using our bicycles for commuting and traveling around the city.

We both work at Addenbrooke's and commute by bike to the hospital very regularly.

I am concerned about the safety of cyclists in the city and worry about my partner when he is out and about by bike.

# Question 2

What challenges do people face in your area that prevent them from cycling, especially children and those using cycling as a mobility aid, and how will you address them?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

Mill Road and Coldhams Lane are the two main commuter roads in Romsey, and many people avoid cycling on or near those roads entirely due to the amount of traffic. Mill Road and the bridge are particularly narrow, and doesn't have any dedicated cycle lanes.

Given the lack of space to improve Mill Road, cycling in Romsey would benefit from making the existing cycle route across the Carter bridge much more obvious, better signposted, and the approach roads & routes much safer. The Greenways project should significantly help with that. There's also the Chisholm Trail, which will improve the North-South cycle route.

If the trail includes a new bridge across the railway, this could be used as a safer alternative to the Mill Road bridge, depending on location. If not, I would be in favour of trialling more extensive changes - redesigning the layout of the Mill Road bridge, or changing the traffic flows over the bridge, or even expanding the bridge to include a new cycle path.

Potholes also make it tricky to cycle down most roads in Romsey, especially along Corrie Road to get to the Carter cycle bridge. Resurfacing these roads is one of my main priorities.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Mill Road deters many people from cycling due to its narrowness and lack of space for cyclists. The high volume of traffic and the hazards created by delivery vehicles contribute to making people feel unsafe about cycling along Mill Road. The bridge over the railway is a particular hazard for cyclists and there is a high number of recorded accidents.
Funding I have secured for refreshing the road markings on the bridge and funding to install advance boxes at the Coleridge Road junction will address some of the safety problems. The police enforcing the 20 mph speed more actively would benefit all users of local roads not just cyclists.
Restricting the times of delivery vehicles and banning HGVs would improve the experience and safety of cyclists using Mill Road.
Mill Road Bridge does need radical attention, for example, installing traffic lights and a single lane for vehicles with a segregated cycle way.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

The main issue is that cycling feels dangerous much of the time.

Mill Road, as it runs through Romsey and Petersfield for example, is a main route for cyclists traveling from Romsey into the city centre. It often feels very unsafe as a cyclist though, as the street is narrow and cars are often anxious to try and squeeze past, especially over the railway bridge.

The condition of the streets around here and the numbers of parked cars, also often make things very difficult for people using bicycles, especially younger cyclists.

The Greens believe in investing much more in protected, safe cycleways, away from heavy traffic as much as possible. We support routes such as the Chisholm Trail and the potential Greenways cycle routes that will give people an option not to have to cycle on the main roads.

Regarding Mill Road in specific, the route is obviously too narrow for dual cycle lanes and two lanes of motor traffic. I would be in favour of looking at all the options of making the road safer and more accessible for cyclists and would work with local residents to hear their views and expertise on the issue.

And I fully agree that cycling should be as accessible as possible for people of different age groups and abilities, I would hope to make new cycling infrastructure workable for all these different groups to encourage many different people to try cycling.

# Question 3

Which aspects of current City Deal proposals do you support, and what additional measures which have not been officially proposed do you think should be explored?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

The Chisholm Trail is a significant improvement to the cycling infrastructure around the east of Cambridge, and cutting congestion will help with improving the safety of cycling across the city. Similarly, the Greenways proposals will hopefully make East-West cycling much safer. However, I note that it doesn't include plans to improve the inner cycle route from the station into town along Lyndewode Road and Gresham Road. This route into town, and the other major cycle routes, need much clearer signage so people know they are on a ‘recommended’ cycle route and can easily follow it to get to where they need to go.

I also think the City Deal should be consulting much more widely and taking suggestions from the whole community. The way it has ‘consulted’ and communicated with residents is severely lacking, and does not inspire confidence in their ability to properly manage and deliver substantive change to Cambridge or the surrounding area.

The City Deal needs to be much more public and open in their initial proposals; this will increase community engagement with the important work the City Deal is doing and help rebuild public confidence in the projects that are being delivered.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Fully support Cross City cycling routes, investment in segregated cycle routes and the improvement of dangerous junctions.
The Fen Causeway/ Trumpington Road/ Lensfield Road junction really needs to be radically improved as a priority.
Fully support the Chisholm Trail and would like to see a quality east/ west segregated cycleway that goes as far as Balsham in the east. The Greenway Routes are a splendid proposal I fully endorse and hope the initiative will spread across the county.
Newmarket Road roundabout needs radical changing to be made safer for cyclists, for example, change to a Dutch design similar to that proposed on Queen Edith’s Way and the existing Radegund Road/ Perne Road roundabout

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

I support the Chisholm Trail and the potential investment in the new Greenways cycle routes into villages and areas surrounding Cambridge City.

I like and support the idea of the Workforce Parking Levy as a way of reducing commuter traffic into the city, it will raise significant money to invest in new public transport infrastructure also which could benefit the city.

I would like to see protected cycle ways from the park and ride sites into the city centre which I don't think has been explore. Also more protected, safe cycle storage at park and ride sites which would mean people could get to the sites by car or other means and travel from there into the city by bike.

As a party we have a strategic vision for transport across the region which includes many more ideas, you can read this here; https://cambridge.greenparty.org.uk/site/Cambridge/files/Transport_Policy_2017.pdf

# Question 4

Which junctions in your area need to be improved to increase safety for people cycling, and how what can be done to fix them?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

The Sainsbury's roundabout is a significant hazard; whilst most cyclists stay well clear of the roundabout itself, the cycle routes around the roundabout need some work, particularly the zebra crossing next to the petrol station and the 'crossing' across Brooks Road (although there is a pelican crossing further down the road). Pelican crossings or other cycle-priority routes across the busy roads here would help

All the junctions along Mill Road are dangerous due to traffic on Mill Road itself; the main way to improve this is to reduce the traffic on Mill Road - this is part of the wider problem of traffic congestion across Cambridge.

The junction of Brookfields and Brooks Road is tricky to navigate, something which the Greenways project should improve by diverting cyclists down Natal Road. And the junction of Marmora and Hobart Roads is also quite dangerous due to the blind corner - as the Greenways project will likely increase cycle journeys on this junction, the traffic priorities need to be made clearer, and installing bollards at the start of the cut-through will encourage cyclists to slow down when approaching the junction.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

The Brookfields junction with Perne Road requires re-configuration to make safer for cyclists and pedestrians.
The Coldhams Lane," Sainsburys" roundabout should be changed to a Dutch design.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

Though this is not a junction, the cycle lanes on Radegund Road are awful, requiring cyclists to swerve in and out the way of parked cars, with the lanes regularly interrupted and disappearing entirely. I would push for these facilities to be looked at and improved, to give cyclists more protection.

I think it falls just outside Romsey but where Radegund Road meets Perne Road at the roundabout, the cycle facilities requiring cyclists to go onto the pavement around the roundabout are awful to use and a complete waste of time. I would work with officers to have these re-done and improved.

I think cyclists should be given priority at the lights at the junction of Mill Road and Coleridge Road and would like to see cycle lanes there to prevent bikes being squeezed in against the pavement.

# Question 5

With Park Street due for demolition, and Grand Arcade cycle park frequently beyond capacity, where do you think a third covered city centre cycle park should be located? What other additional actions do you propose to increase cycle parking capacity on our city centre streets?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

The proposals for Post Office Terrace are interesting and deserve more active consideration, and hopefully the Park Street redevelopment will include a large number of new bike racks.

There are several other places through town where uncovered cycle racks, in a similar design to the racks on Hobson Street, could be placed - I understand the city council has previously done some work on this, and I would be in favour of other cycle racks in the same style elsewhere in the city centre.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

Shortage of space for a new large cycle parking facility in a convenient location in the City is a perennial challenge.
Whatever is to replace the current Park Street structure should have an area designated for cycle parking.
Have much more secure cycle parking space on the Addenbrooke’s site.
Ensure cycle parking is included in every planning application and monitor developers keep to what has been agreed.
Strongly encourage all shops to have cycle parking, where possible, as long as does not impede pedestrians.
If funding was ever to be available, re-visit the notion of a cycle parking area beneath Market Square.
Explore the notion of expanding the Grand Arcade capacity.
Explore and negotiate with University to release space for cycle parking. When Work Place Levy is implemented and a consequent reduction in the number of car parking spaces, more space should then be available for cycle parking.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

I'm unsure where a new secure cycle park could be located in the city centre. I fully support the idea, however, and would be happy to look into the proposals with the county council and local residents.

We support the idea of turning a proportion of private car parking space provided by the council over to cycle parking each year, as a way of encouraging travel by bike and reducing the incentives to commute by car into the overcrowded and polluted city centre.

I also like and support the Cycle campaign's proposal to turn certain amounts of on street parking in city areas over to bike storage.

# Question 6

What measures would you support to boost cycle commuting into Cambridge? For instance, the City Deal Greenways proposal, reuse of old railway alignments, or new bridges over main roads?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the Greenways proposals, and the Chisholm Trail. The importance of medium-distance cycle routes to help solve the congestion problems that plague the city cannot be overstated, but such cycle routes will only be used if they're safe, lit, smooth, go where people want to travel, and clearly signposted throughout.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I fully support the Greenways proposals not just for enabling more cyclists to access the City but for linking surrounding settlements to each other and to work places and education sites with quality cycling routes free of traffic.
Complete the southern A10 cycleway into the city, making it safer and clearly signposted.
Build a quality cycleway from the Waterbeach new development to the City.
Encourage Network Rail and rail operators to have more secure cycle parking at stations along the rail routes to Cambridge.
Build segregated cycle routes where ever possible with staggered time, cyclists go first, traffic signals at junctions, (like at Chesterton Lane/ Castle Street junction and the Catholic Church junction)
Also expand two way cycling on one way streets, where appropriate.
Improve cycle route signage to show most direct, convenient routes.
There is a very specific need at the Central Rail Station to create a convenient, direct route for cyclists travelling from Devonshire Road to the southern part of the Guided Busway route: currently the taxi rank blocks the way, an example of developers not heeding the needs of cyclists.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

As I have suggested above, providing bicycle storage at park and ride sites and protected cycle ways in from there.

We fully support the investment in the Greenways proposal and if I'm elected will push for the proposals to happen as soon as possible and to as high a standard as possible.

A number of measures to reduce overall congestion in our transport vision for the region ( https://cambridge.greenparty.org.uk/site/Cambridge/files/Transport_Policy_2017.pdf ) would make commuting by bicycle more attractive.

The City Deal and new mayor should also ensure that new workplaces, new business hubs etc, are all provided with safe cycling routes when they are built. There should be encouragement and incentives for businesses to provide safe cycling storage and good facilities for cyclists to change and shower etc when they arrive at work.

# Question 7

On Thoday Street, two blocks of eight on-street cycle parking spaces have been created by replacing a car parking place each. Is this something you would like to see more of in your ward? If so, where would you consider it?

Simon COOPER
(Liberal Democrat)

I think the new cycle racks are a great idea, especially where cycle parking is in short supply like many of the terraces in Romsey, and I would support their introduction anywhere the residents are in favour of it.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I think the replacement of car parking space with more spaces for cycle parking should be extended to all the streets in Romsey, particularly where there are shops, pubs and community facilities. The forthcoming consultations for Residents' Parking Schemes are an opportunity to involve residents in deciding where additional cycle parking could be introduced.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Caitlin PATTERSON
(Green Party)

Yes, definitely.

I live on Madras Road and think this would be a good option for many of the streets around here, where many residents cycle regularly but don't have garden space to store bikes. Suez, Malta, Cyprus roads could all use facilities like this.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.