Elections

Local elections (City/SouthCambs), May 2011: Castle

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council (and South Cambs District Council) in May 2011.
Polling date: Thursday 5th May 2011
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Philip James SALWAY  (Conservative Party)
  • Jack TOYE  (Green Party)
  • Philip Andrew TUCKER  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Ashley WALSH  (Labour Party)

Questions for Castle ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Our new Cycling Vision 2016 report, available on our website and as featured in the local media recently, outlines a range of proposals for increasing the rate of cycling in the area. Do you give Cycling Vision 2016 your backing, and what are you most keen to see implemented?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

I do give Cycling Vision 2016 my backing and would be glad to get involved.
I don't (currently) drive and cycle for on average an hour a day-
it's just so much easier!

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

The completion of the cycle path along Madingley Road to the Park&Ride site.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

Living in such a city of Cambridge, I happily cycle to virtually every destination and I cycle throughout the city nearly every day. The plan and proposals of Cycling Vision 2016 would clearly improve the safety and convenience of cycling at a time when environmental and personal health concerns mean that we should encourage as many people as possible to take up cycling. I enthusiastically give my full backing to the report.

Safety should be our first concern, so I am particularly interested by the plan to widen new and existing cycling paths to the government minimum of 1.5 metres, but with a preference to 2 metres. This is crucial on such main thoroughfares as Huntingdon Road, Gilbert Road, Mill Road, Madingley Road and Newmarket Road. This is also why I support the improvements to dangerous junctions which are difficult to navigate, risky to cycle along, and a threat to cyclists.

# Question 2

There is a major shortage of cycle parking all around the city. Cycle theft is over 10% of all reported crime in the County. Do you have any suggestions for locations for cycle parking? Would you be willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in your ward? How will you work towards a situation where every resident and every worker in every ward can keep a bike safe?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

I would need to look around the ward and consult with residents first
but would like to see more cycle parking all over the city- but not to the
expense of car parking spaces. Making it harder to drive into the city
doesn't appear to work in terms of stopping congestion. The best way
is to keep traffic moving and improve park and ride. In an ideal world
the city centre would be pedestrianised except goods vehicles and disabled
access, however this presents more problems for cyclists with pedestrians
wandering in the road. Cambridge gets very busy in the summer and even
cycling can become impossible.

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

Within Castle ward I have not been advised of any specific problem area however one suggestion would be to have a cycle park at Shire Hall which is walking distance from the city centre, where there is the cycle park under the Grand Arcade.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

Cycle parking in the city centre is woefully deficient - it is a major cause of cycling thefts and limits our local economy. We should place individual bars in convenient locations and could place subsantially more parking areas on Parker's Piece, Christ's Pieces and Jesus Green. More room needs to be cleared around the train station for cycle parking.

I would support a small proportion of car parking places to be replaced, but only where it is shown that the spaces are not used. In Castle there is sufficient space to establish new bike parking spaces: this includes outside Shire Hall, on Castle business park, and individual places can be marked out on Huntingdon Road and Madingley Road.

To ensure all bikes can be kept safe, I would campaign to protect spending on our local police. The presence of PCSOs and local officers both prevents crime and ensures criminals can more easily be dealt with. I would also ensure there are sufficient parking places by working regularly with the Cambridge Cycling Campaign on a survey of usage and the changing nature of local residents' needs.

# Question 3

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

The police seem to do this only around the start of term
and I think it needs doing all year round.
The Conservatives have undertaken several cycle surveys
including one last year that showed that over 50% of cyclists
didn't have lights along Mill Road. Clearly this is dangerous
and a reason why so many drivers don't take cycling seriously.
We should be doing more to make everyone safe.

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes See below.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

I agree that police should fine all those who cycle without lights because it is a danger to themselves, to pedestrians and to local motorists. I also agree that cycling on pavements, for similar reasons, must be stopped where possible. It will only become harder to forward the case for cycling if cyclists simply end up annoying pedestrians and motorists.

# Question 4

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

In theory a 20mph would be sensible, however I know
many people would be against it. In the back streets it is
difficult to go above 20, and the consequences of someone
stepping out into the road are obvious. There are already traffic
calming measures and so I think only certain roads should be
considered on a case by case basis. Mill Road for example is
narrow and cars often go too fast..

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

20mph has already been implemented in the area where I have lived for over twelve years. Any real improvement has yet to be identified but in theory it should improve safety.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

I agree that 20mph should be the standard speed in residential streets and areas. This could be implemented in consultation with residents' associations, parish councils, local police, and with the agreement of local residents.

# Question 5

Do you agree that Huntingdon Road should be a 30 mph road with on-road cycle lanes at least 2m wide?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Huntingdon Road is a big road and there are cycle lanes-
as a cyclist I would be for a 30mph limit as crossing it and waiting to turn
at junctions on such a fast road is beyond most cyclists to keep up
with the traffic. I don't know the stats but my guess would be that this
is the most dangerous road in Cambridge. I've found myself waiting a long
time to cross it. This issue needs further investigation..

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

We are campaigning for the 30mph limit to be extended to Girton junction County are dragging their heals etc. The width of the cycle lane needs to be examined with reference to the actual road width.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

As a regular cyclist on Hungtingdon Road, I would campaign to reduce the speed limit and to widen the cycling lane. It is particularly dangerous at the junction with Mount Pleasant and Victoria Road, as well as at the points which approach Girton. Again, this should involve the consensus of local residents and would require appropriate signposting.

# Question 6

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the recent past?

Philip James SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

I would like to see more people using bikes to make the short journeys
around the city, the sheer pleasure of cyling instead of being stuck in
a traffic jam should be obvious, but many people are put off by the traffic
and buses etc. All issues need tackling from all angles involving all road users.

I would be very pro-cycling if elected and would do my best to get cyclists heard
on the city council. Personally I have recently helped 3 friends buy their first bike and
they are all very happy to be riding now. Enough talk.., I'm off for a spin!

Jack TOYE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Philip Andrew TUCKER
(Liberal Democrat)

The general use of pavements for cycling is very confusing and dangerous for pedestrians as is cycling the wrong way along a one way streets particularly in the pedestrianised area of the city centre. Also the use of lights by cyclists needs to be addressed. The use of cycles should be encouraged wherever possible as should walking to reduce pollution and improve the standard of personal health.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

Cycling is perhaps one of the most convenient and most effective means by which we can reduce global warming while encouraging good health. Cambridge is fortunate enough to have the roadspace to accommodate responsible and safe cycling at the same time as providing adequate provision for motorists and commercial driving. We should do more to encourage safety and take-up rates; one excellent way to do this could include local school visits and campaigns from the Cambridge Cycling Campaign. I would be prepared to support this. I am a member of the Labour Campaign for the Environment and I have argued for a protection of cycling budgets and environmental investment.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.