Elections

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Question 5 - we asked:

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the past?

We asked this question in all 16 divisions, namely: Abbey, Arbury, Bar Hill, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, Cottenham, Histon and Impington, East Chesterton, King's Hedges, Market, Newnham, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Romsey, Trumpington, West Chesterton.

35 of the 73 candidates (48%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Matthew W ADAMS
(Conservative Party)

I am a committed pedestrian and user of public transport, and I have never owned a car. On the other hand, I have not been a cyclist for many years, either! I am strongly in favour of a balanced approach to our transport system, with respect for the needs of everyone: pedestrians, cyclists, drivers, bus, train and taxi users (have I left anyone out?)

I think that sometimes transport schemes can fall short of expectations because people try to “encourage” or “promote” one mode of transport over another – inadequate parking provision in new developments, or the intention that 20mph speed limits could be imposed to promote walking or cycling, for example. The success of many of the ideas you have put forward (and the reason why I am generally very supportive of these proposals) is because they are about removing barriers, rather than engineering new ones.

One issue that you haven’t raised, and which is regularly brought up on the doorstep, is that of road and path quality. Some in Cambridge are in appalling condition, to the point at which they are damaging cars and bicycles, and becoming hazardous. Action is urgently overdue!

Samuel J W BARKER
(Conservative Party)

Cambridge is flat, and the sun is out: if David Cameron can do it in London, there is no excuse not to get on your bike in Cambridge! Look out for the Cambridge Conservatives battle-bike (maybe John Prescott could take a leaf out of our book...).

Andrew J BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I look forward to genuinely useful schemes coming out of the cycling demonstration town money and the opportunities for cyclists that the cycle track alongside the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway will introduce.

I am frustrated with the tick-box approach to cycle provision usually undertaken by well-meaning but misguided local and national government automata. I have warned about the unintended negative side effects of provision that is inadequate, such as narrow cycle lanes and shared use paths. I try to promote the importance of cyclists feeling wanted on the main carriageway.

Cyclist confidence is important – and not the false confidence that some facilities instil. I think training must need to play a part – and I know that there are options for that in Cambridge.

Donald F DOUGLAS
(Conservative Party)

I championed "cycle - calming" as a spokesperson in the Environment Committee ten years ago - no-one really took me seriously then! and the southern part of the Chisholm trail.

I have cycled all my life and have five bikes including a Higgins frame racing cycle which I bought in 1962.

Charles S HARCOURT
(Conservative Party)

Parts of Cherry Hinton Road have wide pedestrian pavements. I would like to see a cycle path here.

As far as support, the best thing I can do is set an example by cycling around Cambridge daily.

John M IONIDES
(Conservative Party)

Yes. You have completely ignored the issues of quality of surface, especially potholes. This has been a big issue on the doorstep, and is very much under County control. As a cyclist who prefers to cycle on the road, this is a big problem.

You have also ignored the issue to cycle path maintenance - both from the point of view of how good the surface should be, and what maintenance regimes should be put in place in order to ensure the existing infrastructure lasts well.

Although not a County issue, there is also a significant problem keeping some of the more fancy cycle lanes in Trumpington free from dirt and leaf debris. As the street cleaning machines cannot access them, they need to be cleared by hand on a separate rota and this frequently seems not to happen (well, I have ended up chasing StreetScene on this sort of thing more times than I feel I should).

These are all significant issues in Trumpington.

Michael J MORLEY
(Conservative Party)

The cycling demonstration town money is a welcome resource for Cambridge and should be used widely.

Cycling facilities should not merely 'tick the boxes' laid out by the government but meet the genuine needs of cyclists. Inadequate provision can make things worse rather than no provision, and well-thought-out schemes are a key aspect of the demonstration town.

New routes beyond the city, including along the guided busway, will hopefully encourage morpe people to use their bikes, but to get more cyclists on the roads we need to increase confidence. Training schemes, for which Cambridge is well-placed to provide, will lead to more confident cyclists who are more respectful of other road users.

James A STRACHAN
(Conservative Party)

I would refer you to my response to Question 5.

We will all get along a lot better - drivers, cyclists and pedestrians - if we treat each other with consideration.

We all have a duty of care.

Alexandra L J COLLIS
(Green Party)

The Green Party is committed to a transport hierarchy, in which pedestrians are at the top, then cyclists, followed by public transport - and finally, cars on the lowest rung. Investment in transport should follow this hierarchy of priorities, where reasonable. Cambridge is unusual in having comparatively high rates of cycling. However, becoming complacent about this will have disastrous consequences, and it is important that the council continues to improve facilities for cyclists (particularly by working to tackle the problem of cycle thefts, and by improving cycle routes and parking facilities) - otherwise, rates of cylcing could dwindle away. New cyclists will be reluctant to cycle regularly on dangerous roads, and could easily opt to stay in their cars. Cycling will be seen as too dangerous, and not worth the risk. The council has presented itself as cycle-friendly - but in reality, cycling facilities have been consistently undermined by a lack of proper investment and political will and commitment. The Green party offers a different perspective, and I would be fully committed as your Green councillor to fighting for increased investment in cycling across the city, as well as in West Chesterton.

Ceri B GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I fully support spending to be prioritised for cycle provision in the city and county in general. I believe dedicated cycle-only paths should be created similar to those in Holland so that cyclists need not use the road network.

In areas where this is not possible joint use should be carefully monitored, and pedestrians and cyclists made aware of each others' fears and concerns.

Aggressive cycling should be controlled and were more people wishing to cycle at high speed, dedicated cycle lanes should be used on the roadway. High speed cycling should be banned on current cycle paths that are jointly used by vulnerable cyclists as the two do not work together. Long distance and little used areas obviously can be used if set up for high speed use.

Keith A GARRETT
(Green Party)

Cambridge needs to change how it thinks about transport. With an aim of increasing the number of people in Cambridge city, they council need to understand that cars cannot be the main part of the transport solution. I would like to see us move towards a Copenhagen style of transport where the bicycle and pedestrian are king and cars are tolerated. This would benefit so many areas - health, community, environment, economy.

Valerie T HOPKINS
(Green Party)

Working at Addenbrookes. I belong to the BUG WAG group which encourages the use of walking/cycling and use of public transport for hospital workers. many have switched to the Park & Ride schemes and cycling is increasing but again the provision of cycle parking has been an issue. The impending development of Addenbrookes and the Guided Bus Scheme has meant that there will be many changes and encouraging people to think differently about their journey to work is important. The Green Party will continue to commit itself to issues such as this ensuring that investment in transport priority given to cyclists.

Teal Richard RILEY
(Green Party)

We in the Green Party adhere to a transport hierarchy. Pedestrians are at the top then cyclists, public transport and so on until you get to the car at the bottom.
We believe that investment in transport should be apportioned according to where each mode lies in the hierarchy, within reason.
We also believe that priority should thus be given to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport over the car. Especially where it is relating to road space, but also for cycle parking etc.
Cambridge is very lucky to have such high rates of cycling, but without this forward and radical thinking cyclists will still be squashed in, less confident ones will be frightened to tackle busy roads and many who might cycle will stay in their cars thus exacerbating the problem for all of us.
The County Council has paid lip-service to high quality facilities for greens modes of transport, whichever they be. If you vote for me as your County Council. I can assure you that I will fight to the bone to see investment and transport priority given to cyclists in King's Hedges and across the city. Greens have and always will support this as part of better, greener communities and a planet that we must look after. It is governments, whether it be national or local, responsibility to allow all of us to be able to get around in an efficient and environmental nondestructive way.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

Cycling is my main method of transport. I can drive, but I do not own a car, as I sold it two years ago when I was in a position to be able to cycle to work.

I went on the Reach Fair Cycle Ride (20 miles) this year and thoroughly enjoyed it; this was one of the first 'long' cycle rides I had done and I am proud to have completed it.

I have been using Cambridges public transport and cycling facilities for the last four years. I have seen some of them improve, and I am optimistic about more improvement in the years to come.

The Green Party adhere to a transport hierarchy. Pedestrians are at the top then cyclists, public transport and so on until you get to the car at the bottom. We believe that investment in transport should be apportioned according to where each mode lies in the hierarchy, within reason.

If you vote for me as your County Councillor. I can assure you that I will fight to see investment into cyclists' needs in Cambridge and throughout the County.

Greens have and always will support this as part of better, greener communities and a planet that we must look after. It is governments, whether it be national or local, responsibility to allow all of us to be able to get around in an efficient and environmental nondestructive way.

James C YOUD
(Green Party)

We in the Green Party adhere to a transport hierarchy. Pedestrians are at the top then cyclists, public transport and so on until you get to the car at the bottom.
We believe that investment in transport should be apportioned according to where each mode lies in the hierarchy, within reason.
We also believe that priority should thus be given to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport over the car. Especially where it is relating to road space, but also for cycle parking etc.
Cambridge is very lucky to have such high rates of cycling, but without this forward and radical thinking cyclists will still be squashed in, less confident ones will be frightened to tackle busy roads and many who might cycle will stay in their cars thus exacerbating the problem for all of us.
The County Council has paid lip-service to high quality facilities for greens modes of transport, whichever they be. If you vote for me as your County Council. I can assure you that I will fight to the bone to see investment and transport priority given to cyclists in King's Hedges and across the city. Greens have and always will support this as part of better, greener communities and a planet that we must look after. It is governments, whether it be national or local, responsibility to allow all of us to be able to get around in an efficient and environmental nondestructive way.

Robert YOUNG
(Green Party)

We in the Green Party adhere to a transport hierarchy. Pedestrians are at the top, then cyclists, public transport and so on until you get to the car at the bottom. The Green Party believes that investment in transport should be apportioned according to where each mode lies in the hierarchy, within reason.

I am an enthusiastic, all-weather cyclist and cycling and walking have always been my main mode of transport around Cambridge. I own two bicycles and no car, but as a car club member, I understand that in some circumstances car use can be part of an integrated transport system.

Cambridge is very lucky to have such high rates of cycling, but without the forward and radical thinking of the Green Party, cyclists will still be scared off their bikes, especially in busy areas and many who might otherwise cycle will stay in their cars thus exacerbating the congestion problem for all of us.

The County Council has paid lip-service to high quality facilities for greens modes of transport; if you vote for me as your County Councillor, I can assure you that I will fight to see that these facilities are actually delivered. Greens have and always will support this as part of better, greener communities and a planet that we must look after. It is the responsibility of government, national and local, to allow all of us to be able to get around in an efficient and environmentally non-destructive way.

Thomas A WOODCOCK
(Independent)

Trains and buses should have more space for cycles all of the time even in Rush Hour!
How else can you integrate a transport system!

I have won affiliations to the cycle campaign from The local NUT and Trades Council.

Christine FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

My stance is that I'm pro-cyclist and have pedalled round this city for over 30 years.....

1. Ensure adequate support for the Cycling Campaign which has good grass roots links.
2. The City Council already employs cycling officers - their objectives and achievements should be more widely publicised. Perhaps they should consult on and develop local strategies which could be monitored through area committee meetings. They should, at the very least, use area committees to raise issues, listen to concerns and respond to local problems.
3. Improve and increase cycle parking facilities.
4. Improve road surfaces - cycling through many city streets is like going over a ploughed field!
5. Clarify rights of way etc especially in city centre and ensure that cycle paths are clearly marked and safe. (What is the purpose of that extraordinary bit of path outside Mandela House on Regent Street which just stops?! ) There feels like a growing de-regulation of cycle/ car/ pedestrian use and a lack of clear signage which is creating something of a free-for-all. People don't quite know what they should be doing and this causes confusion, irritation and many minor spills.
Road crossings, like the one outside the Gonville Hotel, are very difficult to use safely.

Leonard A FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

I have been cycling around Cambridge for over 50 years. It is by far the best form of transport for most people. I belong to the Cambridge cycling campaign, and will do all that I can if elected to promote more and safer cycling. Not only is it the healthiest and cheapest transport, it is also the greenest way of getting around in Cambridge. I would like to see the council produce maps of leisure cycling routes around Cambridge - they do exist, but few know about them.

Michael G SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

I very much welcome the Labour Government's designation of Cambridge as a National ‘Cycling Demonstration Town' and the provision of £7 million of funding. Although Cambridge has a very high level of cycle usage, I believe it still does not have good provision for cycling especially for children. There are many examples where you have to navigate from off road cycling provision onto major roads to continue your journey. We need to make sure that the balance of expenditure is moved towards cycling and public transport.

Sadiq TARIQ
(Labour Party)

I support the Government funded Cycling Demonstration Town scheme and I look forward to seeing new projects brought forward. I would like to see greater availability of cycle training for both children and adults and particularly for Cambridge language and summer school students who are particularly vulnerable every year.

Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

I cycle for a rickshaw company in Cambridge City every summer (greenwheels pedicab tours) so know the cycle situation very well. I also did electric bike traffic reports for a local radio station, so know the cycle-traffic interface quite well. I have been consistently supportive of improvements in cycling as a member of the Area Joint Transport Committee, and always read the campaign's comments. Cambridge is exceptionally suited to cycling in many respects: the huge proportion of people who cycle to work, despite the bad infrastructure, makes this clear. We need to improve that infrastructure and start getting towards the kind of figures you can find in Europe.

Keith EDKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

Bicycling is my normal method of transport around Cambridge (even though I now have a bus pass). I subscribe to the sustainable transport charity Sustrans, and I took part in this year's Cycle Rally to Reach Fair.

Susan GYMER
(Liberal Democrat)

We have noted that in other countries you can sometimes take bicycles on board buses. We appreciate the cycling provision for children in schools. With new developments, the concern in the village is that traffic will only increase. Our children have benefited from being able to walk to school.

Nichola J HARRISON
(Liberal Democrat)

I am frustrated by the fact that Cambridge has not yet taken the leap towards being a proper cycling city and that my children, my residents and I are frequently in real danger as we cycle around the city. WE have had victories - the Corn Exchange Street contraflow for example, but there are far too many barriers to safe and convenient cycling and I would like to up my own game in trying to change this. An important part of the task is to change the mindset of the Conservative councillors who run the county council and that is something that I could work on by inviting them to my ward to see the situation and talk to residents.

The work of the Cycling Campaign is absolutely vital in Cambridge. It makes all the difference. There are numerous councillors who cycle and whose natural inclination is pro-cycling, but we often have to arbitrate between different interests and different interest groups. Your rigorous and professional approach gives you enormous influence in these difficult debates, even though I know that sometimes our decisions are frustrating to you.

Julian L HUPPERT
(Liberal Democrat)

As a member of the AJC, and as Chair or vice chair for 6 years, I have done my best to provide good cycling facilities for Cambridge, given the constraints we face. I was heavily involved in schemes such as the lifting of the City Center Cycle ban, the partial closure of Silver Street, and the Riverside bridge, as well as many smaller schemes, such as removing some of the many barriers to cycling, like 'pram arms'. Sadly there are still many of these left, especially on private land, such as the barriers on the path from Riverside to Tescos, which are virtually impassible for anyone with a trailer, as well as for those in mobility scooters.

David JENKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

I'm proud that Cambridge is a cycling city in a way that nowhere else is in the UK. The sights of business people going to work on bikes, older people going shopping on bikes and younger ones going out on the town (stilletos and all) are encouraging. They speak of healthier people and a safer and cleaner environment. We should think of doubling cycling and then doubling it again.

I do cycle and I will use the cycle path along the side of the Guided Bus to take me to work. I live in Histon close to the Gatehouse Lane crossing and work at the St John's Innovation Centre so it's ideal for me.

Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

The Campaign has been successful in engaging with the local authority but perhaps should now consider working with local businesses to guide them in the take up of schemes that encourage cycling, including paying mileage for cyclists, provision of showers and other facilities etc. Also, policing of the 'Taking a Stand' money and encouraging similar schemes would be a good idea. Personally I cycle when I can, with a venerable Dawes Super Galaxy that is a delight to ride. For longer journeys I use trains whenever possible. I telework but encourage my employer and employers clients to have sustainable travel-to-work schemes. On the County I, along with my colleagues, ceaselessly press the anti-cycle Administration to do more. Park and Ride and the CGB aren't enough!

Andrew R PELLEW
(Liberal Democrat)

Again I can't help but stress how important it is for cycle owners to register their bikes details on www.immobilise.com, the information on this site really helps the Police deal with stolen property when they find it.

Other than that I walk to work and I try and use public transport whenever I can. I am a keen supporter of the StreetCar initiative and I hope this is expanded soon into the North of the city.

If anyone has any direct questions or needs anything I've said clarified please feel free to contact me by following the link in Question 5.

Sarah C WHITEBREAD
(Liberal Democrat)

Not really, only that I think it's very good that the cycling campaign do this, and I hope lots of people look at it!
I've been a member of the cycling campaign for the past year. Cycling is my main mode of transport since moving back to Cambridge. I did also cycle to work in London, but the bendy buses made it a bit hairy!

Siep S WIJSENBEEK
(Liberal Democrat)

As a Dutchman I was born on a bike. went to school , to work , went to the townhall to get married on a bike. In Cambridge I hardly ever use my car, only to get in and out for the rest it is my Gazelle Tourer.

Kevin WILKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

The provision of really first-class cycling and walking facilities in the new developments around the fringes of the city is of great importance. We only have one chance to get these things right before the new developments are built and doing so from the start is so much cheaper and affects behaviours as soon as people move in. None of the relevant councils must be allowed to get away with less than high marks.

I choose not to own a car (I live and work in the city and don't have kids, so it's relatively easy for me) so my own experience enables me to stand up for bus users and pedestrians. And delving back into the dim and distant past, I was the first student to speak out against the County Council's crazy (and thankfully defunct) bike ban in the central streets.

Thomas S YATES
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Marjorie R H BARR
(UK Independence Party)

I have not been an elected councillor so far but if I am elected I will encourage cycling as a form of transport in Cambridge and in the County.

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

Provision for cyclists is already adequate. Please remember that motorists are the people who pay to use the roads whereas cyclists are "freeloaders". They are entitled to use the roads but not disproportionately.

If everyone cycled, as you suggest, there would be no roads to ride on.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.