Elections

Local elections (County), June 2009: Arbury

Summary: Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council in June 2009.
Polling date: Thursday 4th June 2009
Division:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Ian C KIDMAN  (Labour & Co-operative)
  • Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Catherine E TERRY  (Green Party)
  • Daniel WHANT  (Conservative Party)

Questions for Arbury division candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

There is a major shortage of cycle parking all around the city. Cycle theft is over 10% of all reported crime in the County. Do you have any suggestions for locations for cycle parking? Would you be willing to see a very small proportion of on-street car parking being replaced by on-street cycle parking in your ward? How will you progress towards a situation where every resident and every worker in each ward can keep a bike safe?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

Arbury has very diverse housing stock and there are places where gardens or other spaces provide ample opportunity for secure cycle parking. However, there are also areas where there is no practical space for self-provision. This includes many blocks of flats and Victorian terraces. There we do need to find a way for people to keep their bikes safe. Cycle hoops are a start but are of limited applicability. I have already spoken with City colleagues about providing stands outside some of the blocks such as those in Cockerrell Road where you can see cycles currently chained to the railings. In the more confined spaces in the South of the ward, there is already overdemand for spaces in the CPZ, and we have a problem with carers not being able to find somewhere to park when attending their charges but there are places where cycle space could be provided. However, it isn't clear that people would willingly use a space at some distance from their homes.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

I absolutely agree that there is a shortage of good quality cycle parking around the city, which increases the potential for cycle crime. I would not only support but push for cycle racks to be given priority over car-parking, especially where there is little or no pavement space. Where there is pavement space access to cycle parking should be easy without dismounting and should be segregated from pedestrians. I would encourage the planting of trees and shrubs near to bicycle parking to allow cyclists more room and protection from other road users. Cycle crime is something we all want to reduce. Working jointly with the City Council, the Police and cyclists I would wish to ensure every shop, pub, cafe or any social amenity has nearby secure bicycle parking. It should also be a priority for the police to weed out any organised bike theft. Stop checks for cyclists, while inconvenient, are a necessary step in preventing and solving bike crime. The requirement for cycle storage on new developments is helpful, but I would push for these to be of a standard and in a location that enables all new residents to feel happy using them.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

# Question 2

Do you support our view that traffic policing (including fining of cyclists without lights or using pedestrian-only pavements) should become a greater police priority?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

I am pleased to have been involved in the establishment of Area Committees and the setting of policing priorities at such meetings. In the North Area Committee there have been periods when the people of the area have asked the police to prioritise such enforcement and that had moderate success. The police should respond dynamically to local needs and wants. If the people want traffic policing to be a higher priority, it should be.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

There is nothing on the road more annoying to me than watching the cyclist in front casually edge forward to roll over the junction at a red light. All cyclists should abide by the law. Those that do not are bringing us all into dispute.
While cycle thefts are a policing priority, cycle safety is a priority for all of us! All cyclists should have lights after dark, and I encourage the police to fine cyclists without lights. Any monies that are taken in from fines given out should stay in system funding the policing of crime the subsidy of bike lights.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

# Question 3

We believe that 20mph should be the norm for local streets in residential areas (as distinct from main connecting roads). 20mph would: greatly encourage walking and cycling; improve the quality of life in an area for residents; and would not delay car journeys significantly (because only the start/end of a journey would be affected). Do you agree that 20mph should become the norm for local streets in Cambridge and surrounding villages?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

I think there should indeed be a presumption for a 20mph limit for local streets in residential areas but, again, the choice should be one for the local people. There are streets in my ward that would benefit greatly, a very local example being Akeman Street and Darwin Drive. As the Portsmouth trial shows, it is important to get the 'hearts and minds' on board as well as simply putting up signs.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

I think that 20mph speed limits should be the norm for residential streets. The Green Party is Norwich successfully pushed for 20mph speed limits for residential streets showing we have a track record of acting on our promises.
I welcome the introduction of these speed limits in central Cambridge and would like to see them extended to some of the suburbs. With 20mph limits, more of Cambridge's traffic can feel safer to move onto bikes, reducing pollution, congestion and making it easier for us all to get around.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

# Question 4

If the County Council's proposed Congestion Charge goes ahead, it is likely that the associated up-front money that would be received from the government to support prior improvements to public transport and cycling would be of the order of some £500m spread over five years. This is roughly ten times the amount the County currently receives for transport. If the scheme goes ahead, what would be your priorities for use of this up-front money?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

The obvious priority is to spend money to help the 'choice' that will entice people out of their cars into more sustainable modes of transport - walking, cycling, public transport, shared transport. So the money should go on schemes to encourage uptake of the least damaging of those. In the context of cycling this should be in improving the network of cycle routes (Arbury being pretty short of proper cycle routes) but improving their quality, the integration with where people want to go and getting the mix of on- and off-road routes right, giving confident cyclists the same opportunities and safety as those who are less confident on a bike. Naturally, for those travelling from much further afield, improving the public transport options is vital.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

In terms of cycling, some of this money would go towards upgrading existing facilities and creating new cycles lanes, including providing cycle routes that do not stop and start suddenly, and new cycle paths to outlying villages. The Green Party would allocate at least £50 Million for these purposes.

I would support a system of 'All electric' buses within the city, reducing pollution particularly for cyclists and pedestrians. I would also push for new Public transport infrastructure where it is needed, such as new stations at Chesterton and Cherry Hinton. I have heard so many bad reports about our local bus service providers that I would strongly urge that a review is carried out and the bus provider contract is put out to tender if possible.

I would also seek to see that substantial monies are spent on integrated transport, allowing people to transfer from bus to train to bike back to bus, and so on. This means giving cyclists secure and easily accessible parking at all major and more minor transport interchanges.

The rail links to and from Cambridge are reasonable with regards carrying cycles at the moment, but if I can push for more and longer trains with better cycle storage, I will.

The guided busway will be operational soon. This has been an object of contention for so long and it hasn't even started running! Now that it is nearly finished and there is very little we can do to change the amount of money already spent on it, I suggest that we all use it as much as possible, to give it a fair trial, and hopefully learn more about what will be useful in the future.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

# Question 5

Gilbert Road currently includes cycle lanes that motorists can legally park in. This means that cyclists, including some of the many hundreds of children in nearby schools, have to dodge in and out of the traffic stream, which is dangerous and unpleasant. Given that Huntingdon Road has cyclist-only cycle lanes yet is a similar situation in terms of parking in front gardens, do you support the removal of on-street parking on Gilbert Road?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the installation of high quality cycle lanes on Gilbert Road. It is an obvious cross route and links with other cycle routes, especially the Jesus Lock-Searle Street-Stretten Avenue one. The concept of hybrid lanes looks attractive and I encourage their introduction. I would note that the comparison with Huntingdon Road is a little false and I would certainly hope that you weren't advocating lanes that were as narrow nor thinking that the housing in Gilbert Road is of the same style throughout.

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

Gilbert Road does not compare to Huntingdon Road. Huntingdon Road is a major road to and from Cambridge. Gilbert Road is not. Having said this, large vehicles parked anywhere where they should not can cause a hazard. Cars pull out to get round them and ignore the right of cyclists to go first.

Because of the new developments, the school and the general residential nature of Gilbert Road, I would recommend something along the lines that the entire road be coloured red, or cobbled, with signage showing that this is a residential area. This is an extreme, and expensive option, but it would highlight and enforce the need for drivers to slow down. I do not believe that 'traffic slowing' measures such as narrowed points or speed bumps would benefit anyone and would just cause cars to noisily rev their engines as they slowed then sped to the next measure.

I do not support the removal of on-street parking on Gilbert Road. Gilbert Road is not unique in having on-street parking and both cars and cyclists deal with this situation on many other roads. The 'problem' is the length and straightness of the road, not the parked cars along the way. Without these, it is possible that the traffic would go faster, seeing less hazards to watch out for.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

# Question 6

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the past?

Ian C KIDMAN
(Labour & Co-operative)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Rupert W G MOSS-ECCARDT
(Liberal Democrat)

The Campaign has been successful in engaging with the local authority but perhaps should now consider working with local businesses to guide them in the take up of schemes that encourage cycling, including paying mileage for cyclists, provision of showers and other facilities etc. Also, policing of the 'Taking a Stand' money and encouraging similar schemes would be a good idea. Personally I cycle when I can, with a venerable Dawes Super Galaxy that is a delight to ride. For longer journeys I use trains whenever possible. I telework but encourage my employer and employers clients to have sustainable travel-to-work schemes. On the County I, along with my colleagues, ceaselessly press the anti-cycle Administration to do more. Park and Ride and the CGB aren't enough!

Catherine E TERRY
(Green Party)

Cycling is my main method of transport. I can drive, but I do not own a car, as I sold it two years ago when I was in a position to be able to cycle to work.

I went on the Reach Fair Cycle Ride (20 miles) this year and thoroughly enjoyed it; this was one of the first 'long' cycle rides I had done and I am proud to have completed it.

I have been using Cambridges public transport and cycling facilities for the last four years. I have seen some of them improve, and I am optimistic about more improvement in the years to come.

The Green Party adhere to a transport hierarchy. Pedestrians are at the top then cyclists, public transport and so on until you get to the car at the bottom. We believe that investment in transport should be apportioned according to where each mode lies in the hierarchy, within reason.

If you vote for me as your County Councillor. I can assure you that I will fight to see investment into cyclists' needs in Cambridge and throughout the County.

Greens have and always will support this as part of better, greener communities and a planet that we must look after. It is governments, whether it be national or local, responsibility to allow all of us to be able to get around in an efficient and environmental nondestructive way.

Daniel WHANT
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.