Obstructions on cycle routes in Cambridge

East Cambridge

Subway under East Road/Elizabeth Way Roundabout

Passageway to Walnut Tree Avenue and Elizabeth Way west side.

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent These dismal subways provide an alternative to the fast and intimidating Elizabeth Way roundabout above.

A single piece of fencing is all that remains of the chicane that used to be here. Although this is a definite improvement, and the remaining fence is justified given the blind corner, this remains a very inconvenient and unpleasant section of cycle route.

Subway under East Road/Elizabeth Way Roundabout

Passageway to Elizabeth Way east side, Abbey Road and Newmarket Road eastbound

Three red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent These dismal subways provide an alternative to the fast and intimidating Elizabeth Way roundabout above.

The chicane shown in the photo has since been eased by the removal of the nearer fence, leaving the other to protect the blind corner. A definite improvement, and a reasonable compromise in a subway that was not designed for use as a cycle route, but this remains a very poor-quality cycle facility.

Subway under East Road/Elizabeth Way Roundabout

Passageway to Newmarket Road westbound

Three red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent These dismal subways provide an alternative to the fast and intimidating Elizabeth Way roundabout above.

The chicane shown in the photo has since been eased by the removal of the nearer fence, leaving the other to protect the blind corner. A definite improvement, and a reasonable compromise in a subway that was not designed for use as a cycle route, but this remains a very poor-quality cycle facility.

Subway under East Road/Elizabeth Way Roundabout

Passageway to Occupation Road and East Road

Three red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent These dismal subways provide an alternative to the fast and intimidating Elizabeth Way roundabout above.

The chicane shown in the photo has since been eased by the removal of the nearer fence, leaving the other to protect the blind corner. A definite improvement, and a reasonable compromise in a subway that was not designed for use as a cycle route, but this remains a very poor-quality cycle facility.

Gwydir Street

Road closure at Milford Street

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent For many years a simple bollard was used here. This allowed two-way cycle traffic to pass through the closure point, and allowed cyclists and pedestrians to keep out of each other’s way.

A few years ago it was replaced by this ugly chicane, which can only be used in one direction at a time.

Hooper Street

Road closure

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent For many years a simple bollard was used here. This allowed two-way cycle traffic to pass through the closure point, and allowed cyclists and pedestrians to keep out of each other’s way.

A few years ago it was replaced by this ugly chicane, which can only be used in one direction at a time. This chicane is noticeably tighter and more awkward than the one in nearby Gwydir Street.

Beehive Centre

Cycle Route from York Street to Coldham’s Lane (Coldham’s Lane end)

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent Why was this bollard put here? No-one is going to try to drive a car along here, so it serves no purpose other than to obstruct cyclists and to reduce the width of the path. Because of the vegetation on one side, everybody passes the bollard on the kerb side.
Beehive Centre

Cycle Route from York Street to Coldham’s Lane (York Street end)

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent The problem with this bollard is that it has been installed on a corner in a location where overhanging vegetation already reduces the width of the path. As a result everybody has to pass it on the right, thereby increasing conflict between oncoming cyclists and between cyclists and pedestrians. Needs a dropped kerb too.
Beehive Centre

Entrance from Sleaford Street

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent Yet another bollard installed in the worst possible location – at a blind corner. The sharpness of the corner together and the presence of overhanging vegetation mean everyone has to pass this bollard on the right Needs a dropped kerb too.
Argyle Street

Road Closure

Five red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent A pinch stile obstructs the cycle gap in this road closure on an important route between the Cycle Bridge and Mill Road.
Rustat Road – Charles Street

Road Closure

Two red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This chicane obstructs the main cycle route between the Cycle Bridge and Cherry Hinton
Marmora Road

Alleyway leading to Coleridge Road.

Five red marksOne red mark
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent The pinch stiles at the Marmora Road end of this alleyway are particularly narrow, and have scraped many knuckles over the years. This alleyway (which was widened in 1989 by compulsorily purchasing part of the adjacent garden) is on the main route between Cherry Hinton and the cycle bridge.
Coleridge Road

Alleyway leading from toucan crossing towards Marmora Road.

Five red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This is the same alleyway as above, but at the Coleridge Road end. Here there is yet another pinch stile. Again, this is on the main route between Cherry Hinton and the cycle bridge.
Burnside

Bridge to The Tins

Three red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This narrow bridge lies on the main off-road route from the Cycle Bridge to Cherry Hinton via “The Tins”, but is too narrow for the most popular brand of child trailer. Since there is no other way to get onto The Tins, cyclists towing trailers have to use the 40mph Coldham’s Lane instead.
Coldham’s Common

Entrance from Newmarket Road

Four red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent The swing gate on this busy north-south cycle route should be replaced by a cattle grid. High pedestrian flows and poor visibility mean that careful design is needed. Perhaps the wall on the left should be lowered, or the pedestrian crossing moved to the right a few metres.
Coldham’s Common

Entrance from Abbey Pool

Four red marks

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This swing gate on this popular route should be replaced by a cattle grid.
Barnwell Road

Path to Barnes Close

Three red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This segregated cycle/pedestrian route used to be fine until 2000 when a chicane was added to the cycle (right) side. Now nearly all cyclists go down the pedestrian (left) side because it is easier – a good example of why this sort of measure is counter-productive.
Newmarket Road

Path to Peverel Road

One red mark

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This route has separate paths for cyclists and pedestrians; the photograph shows just the cycle part. The chicaine isn’t particularly severe but is still awkward. A dropped kerb onto Newmarket Road would make this much more useful.
Newmarket Road

Path from side of shops to Peverel Road

Four red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent The previous route to Peverel Road doesn’t serve the shops. To get from the side of the shops to Peverel Road, cyclists use this alleyway and join the previous route half way along. Unfortunately they first have to negotiate this pinch stile.
Howard Road

Path to Ditton Lane (Howard Road end)

Five red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent This alleyway forms part of a useful route from the City Centre to the Fison Road estate, via a pelican crossing across Ditton Lane. Unfortunately there are pinch stiles at this end…
Howard Road

Path to Ditton Lane (Ditton Lane end)

Five red marks
No trailers

Image of an obstruction, as described adjacent …and at the other end.