Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2018: Trumpington

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2018
Polling date: Thursday 3rd May 2018
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Ceri GALLOWAY  (Green Party)
  • Dan HILKEN  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Phil SALWAY  (Conservative Party)
  • Katie THORNBURROW  (Labour Party)

Questions for Trumpington ward candidates (8 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

# Question 1

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do yourself?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

We use bicycles as our main vehicle and combine them with public transport for all journeys including holidays. We have not owned a car for 25 years however since the rerouting of the Citi 7 and reduction in evening and Sunday services in Trumpington we have had to buy a car so my partner to get home from work at night and this has been an expense for our family and reduced our income. We believe effective public transport supports people right to be independence from car use.
We enjoy cycling and feel more in contact with our surroundings and find it is less stressful than driving and we think the reduction in car usage makes it safer for all pedestrians and cyclists including older and younger people. It also helps people who may be dependent on a car for access to the mainstream, such as disabled people to get around and live less stressful lives.
As an older person with a physical disability cycling keeps me fit and active and I prefer to cycle off the road. I find most parents prefer their children to be independent and would like to make sure their routes to school and leisure activities are car free for their own peace of mind.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

My family and I cycle in Cambridge unless it’s not practically feasible or safe. My wife commutes daily by bike from south Trumpington to West Cambridge. My 12-year-old daughter travels daily to Trumpington Community College, activities and friends within Trumpington, and I expect in her teens will venture beyond alone. As a family, we travel together all around Cambridge, including with our dog in my caged basket. My normal transport since a child in Cambridge has been bicycle, including a decade in London and several years in Beijing. My parents, now in their 80s, have been cycling in Cambridge for many decades. I find safer routes for my wife as she did not grow up cycling regularly. I have particular safety concerns about my daughter’s routes — see below, plus, as my daughter’s school is part of the Parkside Federation, she will soon need to cycle between TCC, Parkside and Coleridge, routes which have some dangerous stretches that could be greatly improved.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

I live on my own so I'm the only cyclist in my household.
I'm an experienced cyclist and own several bikes, and enjoy restoring vintage bikes.
A few years ago I rode the amateur Paris-Roubaix and finished without crashing!

I find Cambridge traffic challenging to ride in and imagine it must be difficult for children and older residents.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

I have lived in Cambridgeshire for over thirty years and have always cycled - when I’ve lived in the City it’s been my main way of getting around. All of my family members cycle regularly and our garage is filled with bikes. I’m obviously concerned about road safety for my children, and myself as I grow older.

# Question 2

A key aim of our organisation is enabling more people to cycle, by the provision of protected space for cycling away from traffic, not shared with pedestrians, thus reducing traffic and providing transport choice. This best-practice is outlined in our guide, Making Space For Cycling, endorsed by all national cycling organisations. Do you support these principles, and if so, where could they most effectively be applied in your ward?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I feel that a Dutch style cycle path system would make it safer for younger and older and disabled people to feel safe and increase the volume of cycling in the city.
I fully endorse this document “Making Space for Cycling” it is very thorough and covers many of the cycle issues I have campaigned for in the last 40 years. It very good to see such a comprehensive document in print. Thank you Cambridge Cycle Campaign for producing this.
What is needed now is local and national government to get behind it and fund the changes that need to take place and to see this enshrined in planning law.
From reading the document I have few questions for further discussion in the cycling community. In future I would like to see more focus in this documents on how we make cycling more appropriate for less abled people.
1. How do we make cycling more appropriate for less abled people, such as older people with medical conditions that affect their ability to use cycle facilities and for promotion of cycling for disabled people in general?
For instance there is no restriction to the ground floor parking of the new multi-storey cycle park at Cambridge station for people who have, walking limitations or for other users with large cargo bikes or for use of lower level of cycle rack being restricted to users with poor hand function and strength. Nor is there easy access to upper floors when this area is full as there are no lifts to upper floors, which seems quite an oversight in new building where disability issues should be considered.
The upper storey of the cycle racks are very difficult to use if you have arthritis in your spine, hands or reduced physical strength due to age or disability causing back pain and rib pain and frustration when you can’t pull the rack down or up for instance. These concerns when raised with local government decision makers seem unheard it appears they seem to think cycling is for fit healthy young adults.
2. It would also be good to see more ideas to support other groups with complex needs such as employers using cycles for delivery and employee transport where they provide suitable bikes at work for transport to locally. I’ve worked in number of places when bikes were provided for staff to make visits to see clients or do shopping at lunch time. This is useful to those who have limited choice and have to use a car as their main transport to get to work. In other places in-service cars meant staff could come to work by bike and do some travel by car and bike during work hours.
3. I’d like to see more discussion on better disabled cycle parking and parking for parents carrying children in cargo bikes or to move bulky items and general shopping. Parking for these groups Can be very problematic
4. I personally and not keen of cycle lanes next to main roads, preferring a line of trees between myself and a vehicle. I imagine that many people feel similarly.
5. I would like to see a lot more work done on cycle junctions. The one at Lensfield, Regent Street and Hills Road has been confusing due to unfamiliarity but having got used to it I prefer it to what was there before. However the Junction from Barton Road and Fen Causeway always confuses both myself and my partner as it is not clear when you have the right of way to cross the road. I have observed many others being unable to decide if it is our turn to go ahead because the lights are not obvious. It needs clearer lining up of the lights.
6. I’d like to see the promotion of cycling for disabled people in general increased and an interest free method of purchasing suitable bikes and off-road buggies and grants for people on low incomes for this plus training and more options to try out off-road bikes and buggies before purchase.
7. Finally I think there is not enough discussion in the document about the differing needs of slow and steady cyclists and those who prefer to cycle faster to get from A to B. My partner cycles on the road as he wants to travel fast this puts him at disadvantage from a safety point of view. At the same time cyclists travel very fast on the guided busway cycle path from the station of to Trumpington. As they see it as cycle path for themselves as well as slower cyclists. This addition of fast cycling on the track becomes more unsafe when there is a mix of runners and pedestrians. However on segregated paths I think there would still be conflict between slower and faster cyclists because when people get up speed it’s more difficult to be aware of others. We need cycle paths for people who prefer to get from A to B at speed and wish to get fit and use their strength effectively to cut time of their journey time. I feel though this may have to wait for a longer term solution as we are not yet providing a good enough cycle infrastructure for people in general. However this discussion needs to be included in future documents ready to make changes in policy.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the principles, and believe Cambridge should aim to be among the most cycle-friendly cities in the world, learning from abroad such as Holland and Denmark. At the same time, we should bear in mind that it is prudent for the popularity of the cycling cause to carefully consider the consequences of safety measures that disrupt motor traffic, especially in Trumpington where options are severely constrained. In part, the answer could be a user-first approach, where improvements are suggested by the public (see Q5 below). Another angle is to nudge the city towards cycling, by planning proactively with organisations such as Camcycle. At the moment, half a dozen locations I see in the ward where the principles could most effectively be applied are: 1) the corner of Hauxton and Shelford Roads, because the crossing at the entrance to Waitrose is extremely dangerous for children travelling to and from Trumpington Meadows school; 2) along Hobson Avenue from the Busway southwards, which is very dangerous for children travelling to and from Park School and to and from Trumpington Community College, and for cyclists alongside the Busway (see further below); 3) from the end of the Busway cycle path northwards into the rail station, where little protection exists even though this is part of the Parkside Federation route; 4) on Trumpington High Street, especially at the Anstey Way turning, which is very dangerous and recently had a fatality; 5) lighting on the Busway and paths into the Foster Road estate, in order to deter attacks; 6) the currently limited cycling provision in all the newly built estates, as they progressively get adopted by the Council.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

I do support segregating cyclists from traffic where possible on safety grounds
although this can have some crossover with bus lanes which is less than desirable.
There are dedicated cycle lanes in the ward including new ones on Trumpington road.
I would like to see some signage at the town end warning all road users of the potential dangers
as the Lensfield road roundabout is an accident black-spot.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

I absolutely support the provision of better infrastructure for all road users, especially those most vulnerable. In Trumpington, there is good cycling provision from Bateman Street south to Alpha Terrace, with a dramatic drop-off in quality from Alpha Terrace to the M11 junction.
There are two areas about which I feel particularly strong: first, the junction that governs access to Waitrose, particularly the right-turn lane facing south; and second, Hobson Avenue junction across the guided busway.

In addition, I think small changes – such as paving unpaved cycle tracks around the ward, and reconsidering pedestrian and cycle safety during construction – could have a major impact on providing transport choice.

In addition to infrastructure improvements, there are a few things I would like to see that would support better transit opportunities for all Trumpington residents. I would love to see bike racks added to Busway vehicles, preferably of the sort shown used in places like Stuttgart. The more common fold-down racks only fit two cycles at a time). Additionally, adding an additional bus stop north of the turn-off to Addenbrookes would mean many more buses serving the Trumpington community.

Finally, there are a number of old or informal cycle and pedestrian tracks around Trumpington that are in a poor condition. Improving them – preferably without closing them, as that entails substantial disruption to regular users – would make a big difference to people who are car-free or experience limited mobility.

# Question 3

Safe use of the roads is a major issue. Our view is that traffic policing, of all groups of road users (cyclists, drivers, etc.), should become a greater police priority, and that this should be evidence-based, namely based on the relative levels of danger presented by each such group. What are your thoughts, and where would your priorities be?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I agree with many of the solutions to bad behaviour in your paper “Responsible, legal cycling”. It is frustrating that much is made in the media of cyclists bad behaviour, but without challenging attitudes of drivers towards cyclists, which can be very distressing. The quote below from your document makes it clear that cycling is by far the least dangerous option for the public so we need to promote safe cycling and challenge attitudes.
“Enforcement of the rules is important for all road users. However, the consequences of transgressions by motorists are likely to be far more serious than those by cyclists. We understand that pedestrian deaths caused by cyclists are about one every two years nationally (and that, in terms of injuries, more cyclists than pedestrians are hurt in cycle/pedestrian collisions). By way of comparison, 823 pedestrians were killed by motor vehicles in 2001[1]. Moreover, 53% of motorists do not obey the speed limit in urban roads with a 30mph speed limit[2]; 95% of vulnerable road users survive a collision at 20mph; at 40mph only 15% survive”
One thing that could help cyclists to be safer users would be to have more training in cycle use and cycle maintenance and for some cyclists to recieve help or interest free loans with expensive items. Bike maintenance and replacement of parts is expensive. I spend £200-300 per year to maintain my bike and replace parts. This is restrictive to people low incomes, for instance inadequate lights might be due to cost of batteries or the lights themselves. Good quality lights that threw a useful beam are at least £30 each and very effective Dynamo lights cost more.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

I agree, and would emphasise that prevention is better than cure. My priorities would be: 1) to create a more comprehensive network of safe cycle routes throughout Cambridge; 2) put up signs on roads reminding drivers that they must be on the look-out for cyclists; and 3) have a tougher approach to speeding. I would suggest declaring Cambridge a “cycling city”, to encourage cycling as the default transport, and go from there.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

As a cyclist, driver and pedestrian I can see the difficulties that all road users have
but we have to share the roads. Cyclists riding without lights should be a higher police
priority and not just at the start of term. Cambridge Conservatives undertook a cycling
survey at midnight on Mill road bridge a few years ago and found that half of all cyclist did not have lights.
Police investigations should be evidence based and not target just one group of road users.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

I was very encouraged to hear that the Cambridge Police have undertaken Operation Velo, inspired by the Wet Midlands' initiative Operation Close Pass, to educate drivers about how to overtake safely and to educate cyclists on how to protect themselves as vulnerable road users.

# Question 4

We are keen to see more children being able to cycle safely to school independently. Ideas from our members to assist this include protected space for cycling, parking/pickup bans 200m of schools, cycle parking. What measures would you suggest?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I agree with the above suggestions and your document “Making Space for Cycling” has many more useful suggestions. Proper planning is central to good cycle infrastructure and a full review of all routes to school for children in Cambridge is essential leading to a plan that would put in place safe routes to schools including Sawston Village College where many young people in Trumpington have chosen to go. There are gaps in the cycle provision to Sawston which means parents have concerns about children cycling to the college there are no off-road cycle routes to Shelford and the on road cycle path from the Shelford junction and the Rose Pub is none existent and crossing to the cycle path to Sawston form there is unsafe. In Trumpington the cycle route to Fawcett School has been well used over the years with majority of children cycling to school. However a holistic plan for children to cycle from the new developments in Trumpington to all the schools has not been considered in the planning process and some routes have missing sections.
The spine route form Addenbrookes Road to Long Road to the new primary means pupils will be cycling on the narrow road used by resident car users to access their homes and the 25 bus servicing the primary school and the GP surgery and community centre. This road also leads to the Secondary School and many parents are concerned about the crossing at the guided busway.
An off road route needs to be considered and marked clearly.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

I am too, and I would go further: all children should be able to cycle to school safely. The most practical strategy for seeing to this is to work with the schools. The best tactic is then again to take a user-first approach: look at each cyclist’s route to school and make it safe. At present, we have instead gaps in the cycle network that make it impossible for some children to cycle to school (even with parents, sometimes): my examples above show we are to some extent wasting excellent cycle paths on Shelford Rd, Lime Avenue and elsewhere because the gaps on the system deter use by cyclists.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Banning parents dropping off within a certain distance of the schools and
safer cycle lanes will encourage children and their parents to cycle to school.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

Trumpington has six state schools and seven private schools, and so cycling to and from school is a real prospective growth area in Trumpington. My focus is the stretch of road south of Alpha Terrace, for families with children at Trumpington Meadows Primary School.

There are a few other places within Trumpington that should likewise be a focus of campaign activity. Hobson Avenue, where a road crosses the guided busway, is a dangerous intersection that requires a two-pronged approach: it needs changes to the signalisation and road users need to be educated about the dangers inherent in the junction. As a resident of the Novo estate pointed out, many of the roads in new estates in Trumpington have not been adopted, and as a result see high traffic speeds and are becoming rat runs. That said, the whole of Trumpington should be assessed for vulnerability, so that we can build resilience into the design of the city.

# Question 5

Our volunteers spend a lot of time scrutinising planning applications for failures such as lack of secure cycle parking, poor access, failure to fund nearby improvements to make the roads safer, and so on. Many of these things get let through by officers and Councillors in clear contravention of the Local Plan. The lack of a full-time cycling officer makes this situation even worse. What are your main concerns about the planning system, and how would you seek to make improvements?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I think funding for cycle officers should be considered as a priority as an increase in cycling will reduce congestion, air pollution and promote health benefits and safety. However to do this policies need to be put in place to increase the understanding for instance of the effects of cost of cycling to low income families.

Given the current cuts to local government cuts we need to look at priorities in local funding so we use public finance for policies that bring about real change and supporting cycling better will do this, as well as a change of government to make this take place.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

Your work is very important. But I understand that, unfortunately, the transport authorities (County, Combined Authority) and the City Council as the planning authority do not coordinate well. With better leadership, and if Cambridge declared itself a “cycling city” as a starting point, improvements could be made in order to make the slogan a reality for everyone. I would suggest that an efficient approach, alongside working directly with Camcycle and other groups, would be to set up a related interactive map similar to “https://highwaysreporting.cambridgeshire.gov.uk” on which cyclists can post suggestions for improvements to particular areas. But I would also reiterate my suggestion of proactively planning a comprehensive network of safe cycle routes equal to that of our car-friendly roads: the creation of the cycleway alongside the Busway has shown that building a good route for cyclists can attract them in droves even though they may never have asked for it (it was originally designed as a maintenance track for the Busway.)

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Vote Conservative for a Councillor who will do what residents want and will respect the Local plan!

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

My biggest concern about planning in Cambridge is that funding cuts and re-organisation have put enormous pressure on planning officers. Councillors are volunteers and often lack experience and expertise. I am heartened to see that there has been funding allocated for a third planning enforcement officer. I would like to see a number of steps to ensure the quality of the built environment across Cambridge: greater availability of training for officers and members; a consideration of pedestrian and cycle safety in the design and construction of new buildings and estates (i.e. incorporating all road users in a proposed development's travel management plan); and greater resources devoted to safeguarding vulnerable road users of all kinds.

# Question 6

Cycle routes which are narrow and involve sharp turns and chicanes make routes difficult or impossible for users of adapted cycles, tricycles, handcycles, cargo cycles and cycles with trailers, impairing accessibility for the most vulnerable. Can you think of anywhere in your ward where it is difficult to use a non-standard cycle and what would you do to improve it?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I cycle in most areas of this ward these are examples were vulnerable cyclists are disadvantaged:
1. Parking: I definitely observe the need for more specialist parking for none standards bikes that is clearly labelled as such. There does not seem to be any specialised cycle stands in the city. When parked in the street these bikes (which are often very much more expensive), look vulnerable to theft due to the difficulties owners have locking them up, this must cause stress. Further consideration for non-standard parking is required in all wards. I have long argued for a blue badge parking scheme for cyclists. It is something I personally would benefit from alongside this needs to be coupled with clearer notices to tell able bodied cyclists stating which cycle stands are suitable for disabled users. We need to make sure the ground floor of the new cycle parking multi-storey at the station is only available to those that need ease of parking. While this carpark is not in Trumpington we need to be able to have parking at the end of our journey as well as in Trumpington itself.
2. Missing links: The Hobsons Avenue is one example without a dedicated cycle path and therefore vulnerable cyclists are channelled along a very narrow street barely wide enough for two cars to pass, has a bus and resident car access. Once all the housing is completed this road will be much busier especially because residents and visitors to the community centre and GP services and shops will be required leave by the same route. There is likely to be some parking to drop off for the primary school at peak times. A dedicated cycle link is needed here for vulnerable users.
3. Junctions: There are number of new junctions in Trumpington taking cyclists across busy roads that are stepped in an unhelpful way. For example the crossing on the junction at Consort Avenue returning to the Guided Busway from Waitrose consists of two islands requiring three turns through narrow entrance to get back onto the road, very problematic to most non-conventional cycles and requiring some redesign in future.
4. Uneven cycle paths: There are areas where uneven surfaces in the older parts of Trumpington are unhelpful, funding for relaying surfaces would be useful.
5. The Dutch practice of allowing mobility Scooters on cycle paths would require a much higher standard of cycle paths segregated form other users. I suspect while we have mixed use, Pedestrians and Runners using cycle paths as well as cyclist in Cambridge mobility scooters would cause safety concerns. However I would agree that use of segregated cycle paths would be ideal for mobility scooters.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

Fewer people in Trumpington use non-standard cycles, except on the N11. I only know a couple of users within Trumpington Village, who gave up, saying that the roads here are too unsafe for non-standard bikes. The roads are rather too big than too small, and the junctions almost impossible for non-standard bikes. A network of safe cycle routes would solve this, but it won’t be easy.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Cycle lanes in Trumpington are generally good, where I have noticed a problem is on Brooklands Avenue.
The shared footpath is very difficult to walk along for fear of being hit by a cyclist in either direction and I have seen several cyclists
come off their bike when leaving the path to overtake and hitting the small ledge when attempting to get back on the path.
Brooklands Avenue is narrow and congested so a cycle path on the road would probably not help any road users.
Some signage would be a good idea here.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

As a regular and frequent cyclist, I know of many places in Trumpington that could be improved for standard and non-standard cyclists alike. Each deserves individual consideration, but I would love for the ward to receive a comprehensive assessment of cycling strengths and weaknesses.

# Question 7

A junction with the Busway at Hobson Avenue was recently created. Traffic lights have been installed that give priority to the very low-traffic Hobson Avenue over the Busway. The hundreds of people walking and cycling per hour along the Busway path are now expected to press a button and wait up to 30 seconds for a green man to cross a sideroad. This seems to us the wrong priority. Would you seek to rectify this situation, so that the priority is restored to walking, cycling and public transport on the Busway?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I am in favour of the Guided Busway Cycle Path having much greater consideration as the priority route. This will undoubtedly be the busiest route throughout all parts of the day. However some consideration needs to be made for cyclists and pedestrians coming along Hobsons Ave as it is a route to 2 schools and has a fast bus route on it. If we are to reduce car usage, special consideration of School routes must me made.
On discussion with cyclists in Trumpington I found a great deal of concern about the crossing at Hobsons Ave in direction of the Railway Station and the Park and Ride. They offer two potential solutions for this problem.
The first and preferable option is to make the default for the lights to go green in the direction of the guided busway/cycle/pedestrian path. Button could still be pressed for crossing the guided busway and the number 25 bus would trigger the lights when it crosses the busway around every half hour.
However for this option to work for children and adults on bikes crossing the guided busway there needs to have very clear signage and yellow lines to warn people of the need to slow down and stop before crossing and wait for the lights to change.
A second possible solution posed by cyclists is to set up detectors in the cycle path so that the lights change in good time to allow cyclists to cross the side road.
Many cyclists and pedestrians cross both routes without checking carefully. This is especially true as most have got used to this junction before it was opened to motor traffic.
However the guided busway will always be the greatest risk to all users crossing it. It might be preferable to have a barrier similar to those at level crossings that shuts when a guided bus is passing. The barrier lights would control all users crossing the junction in the direction of the school and community centre and reduce the risk of very serious injury from being hit by a bus traveling at speed.
At the same time those on the cycle path will be able to see when the barriers have risen and know they need to slow down and if there were yellow ridged lines similar to those on car lanes long before they arrive at the junction to remind cyclists to slow down plus clear notices letting new users know that at times there will be traffic crossing cyclists will be forewarned to slow and stop for vehicles crossing. A priority for the main cycle path could be factored into the lights changes.
Many residents as well as cyclists feel it is also vital that the city council do not back down on stopping traffic from the Clay Farm development using the crossing as a rat run to reach Long Road. It should be for cyclists, pedestrians, buses, emergency vehicles and disabled access only.
I understand that rising bollards were installed but because they were not maintained they stopped working prior to the road being opened. A barrier at the busway crossing might be a more long term solution that can only be triggered by a bus or an agreed user and the lights on the busway could be set to stop the guided bus in emergency of when emergency service vehicles need to cross. While a barrier is an expensive option this junction is so dangerous due to its proximity to the guided busway and it multiple use that the cost would be justified. As part of the congestion strategy posed by the county council to reduce pollution and congestion not car use needs to be safe.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

I have worked with the Trumpington Councillors, and directly with Council staff, the property developer Countryside and Trumpington Community College about various safety problems with this crossing. Indeed, I was one of the first people to report the problem, because it is on the road I live on, and my daughter and wife cross it to school and work every day. Although my subjective interest is in the safety of those of us travelling along Hobson Ave, I have also reported and pushed for the safety of people travelling alongside the Busway, including the point about lights priority. The issue will next be discussed in the next South Area Committee meeting, this Monday, 23 April. LibDem City Councillor Zoe O'Connell has got the County Council & Countryside to agree to come to discuss/defend how they're fixing (or not) the Busway crossing.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Reversing the lights would be the sensible thing to do at a junction with low traffic volumes.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

I would seek to restore priority to the Busway users. At present, not only is there a long wait for the signal to change, it is too short for anyone but an able-bodied adult to cross in time, which is also something that could be improved.

# Question 8

What would you do to improve the Newtown area, which is currently difficult to cycle in because of the many one-way streets and short-cutting by some drivers? Would you support the development of a comprehensive plan to improve the area?

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I would support the development of a comprehensive plan for Cycling and cycle parking in Newtown. Parking is problematic for residents and the narrow the streets make cycle use attractive. I would support the construction of German style parking facility for able bodied residents that is not necessarily directly next to the place residents live but close by. It would need to be an underground car park due to limited space this would free up more space for cyclists. Funding from monies such as 106 money from the large developments would be an appropriate use of this capital, current residents affected by the increase in population would benefit from the use of money in this way in areas where the planning and design was for bygone age. Two way cycling in Panton Street and Brookside would be helpful and allow better movement and more trees and islands of green space could be created with disabled parking and an increase in cycle parking.

Dan HILKEN
(Liberal Democrat)

I would work with the North Newtown Residents Association, which is pushing for a plan for the area, including improved parking regulations to better control parents picking up children from school. Newtown is not well suited to cars, as the streets are narrow, and with some improvements would make an excellent bicycling area. But like many aspects of cycling, improvements to transport in Cambridge more broadly could help the local issues. As a Councillor, I would work with the LibDems to fulfill our manifesto pledge to transform the city’s public transport system. Our priority is to tackle congestion and allow more road space for cycling and walking.

Phil SALWAY
(Conservative Party)

Sheer congestion and traffic volume in this part of the city makes
getting around difficult. I would support an investigation in to how
this could be improved for cyclists.

Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

Traffic in the Newtown area is particularly bad during school term time at rush hour. At other times of day and year, it is a relatively pleasant cycling environment. If elected, I would seek to work with private schools to make school drop-off a safer and more seamless experience for everyone.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.