Elections

2016 Cambridge City Council Election: Petersfield

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council May 2016
Polling date: Thursday 5th May 2016
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Catherine DURANCE  (Conservative Party)
  • Sharon KAUR  (Green Party)
  • Daniel LEVY  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Richard ROBERTSON  (Labour Party)

Questions for Petersfield ward candidates (8 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

# Question 1

Cambridge Cycling Campaign has created a guide to cycling best-practice called Making Space For Cycling, endorsed by all national cycling organisations. Do you fully support this guide, and if so, what one principle in it do you think could most effectively be applied in your ward?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

I fully support this guide and saw it last year at Be the Change where I facilitated a workshop on cycling. I fully support this guide also because I have seen it in practice in Sweden and agree that it would work here. I believe having cycle lanes along Mill Road especially would make a huge difference. Mill Road is a busy road that when I have cycled have been frightened by cars and the lack of space given to feel safe cycling.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the guide, and think that developers in the city as well as county councillors and members of planning committees should take its contents into consideration. I think that convenience is the principle most relevant to Petersfield. In particular, the provision of even, well maintained surfaces and removal of obstructions where possible.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

The Campaign’s guide and the Sustrans handbook are both useful tools. Applying the principles in Petersfield is quite difficult on the roads which would most benefit especially Miill Road. Providing mandatory cycle lanes on Gonville Place and East Road need consideration.

# Question 2

What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

I would like to see direct routes being created and strongly used by schools. These routes will have their own cycle lanes that are visible, with lighting. These routes, where possible would be away from the road and have enough space. But also the roads near the route will need to have lower speed limits.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

Ensuring adequate cycling and pedestrian access to school entrances. East Road and Norfolk Street, which give access to St Matthew's Primary School, already appear to do a reasonable job of it, although people approaching it from Petersfield would probably be coming from the other direction. Maintaining the roads and pavements around schools and taking measures to ensure visibility of road users would help in this area.
The Liberal Democrats success at getting cycles lanes on East Road made mandatory will also help here. We have also made a long term commitment to the Chisholm trails which will enable safer off road cycling across the city.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

Too much of the danger to children on their journey to school is caused by to many parents driving to drop off their children. The way some of them park on corners and/or block pedestrians is quite extraordinary. More walking and cycling to school should be encouraged. Safe routes to school identified and publicised. More cycle racks at schools. Cycle proficiency schemes developed further.

# Question 3

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do yourself?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

I used to cycle until my physical health deteriorated. But when i did I felt scared cycling on main roads as it felt like a struggle against motorists, and mainly Mill Road with cars parked meant having to either get off the bicycle or hoping I would not be hit by an angry motorist. Having spoken to residents with families, one particular lady told us that her youngest son cycled to school every day so he didn't end being stuck on the bus at peak traffic time. She said she often worried about his safety. This really touched me.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

I walk rather than cycle. No one in my family currently cycles, although I have a relative who used to many years ago and gave it up over safety concerns.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

I cycle every day in Cambridge and find it quite safe though one has to take more care in rain (or snow) partly because of the slippery conditions but also the reduced visibility for drivers of vehicles. I usually wear a helmet mainly because granite kerbs are unyielding if your head hits one. I first wore a helmet when we started a family, partly to act as a role model for our daughter. My concerns are for myself and others in my family equally really. We almost always wear a helmet while cycling. One is inherently more vulnerable as a cyclist than almost everyone else whether in a vehicle or walking.

# Question 4

Secure cycle parking has been fixed in the short term at Cambridge Railway Station but is still a major problem for people travelling to work or to shop in the city centre. Where do you think that additional cycle parking can be provided in the city centre?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

First of all, I think we should be reducing car congestion in the centre of the city. There are a number of ways to do this including congestion charge and making Park and Ride free again. So, I would suggest taking out more spaces in the car parks in the city centre and replacing those spaces with cycle parking. I have also seen that one parking space can fit so many cycles in it and this should be further explored for within the centre and more widely in other wards too.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

My understanding is that this has been investigated and found room to expand the bike park facilities at Lion Yard.
It is Liberal Democrat policy to allow up to one in twenty on-street parking spaces to be taken over for other uses by the community, so bicycle parking spaces might be made available that way or by converting pay and display parking at locations such as Park Terrace to secure cycle parking.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

It may be possible to identify space for bikes in multi storey car parks such as Lion Yard but places of employment in the city centre (especially shops and colleges) should provide more off-street bike parking for their staff (and students) in order to free up the on-street racks for others. It is noticeable how many racks fill up as shop workers arrive for work. The City Council uses basements and back passageways for its staff bike parking and other employers should do the same if possible.

# Question 5

Recent construction in the city, such as on Abbey Street, Milton Road and at the University Arms have closed routes or removed cycle space. What would you do to ensure that cycle routes remain open and safe as construction grows the city?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

I would firstly explore if there are alternative, safe routes possible and then pressure the construction companies to not obstruct public pathways. In the future I would make sure these companies make provisions for cyclists that are also safe to use.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

A combination of planning and the City Council's Considerate Contractor scheme could be used to try and protect cycle routes. Enforcing the terms of planning applications would be a part of this and the if we controlled the council, Liberal Democrats would employ an extra officer for this. We would also need to work with colleagues on the County Council to try and ensure that efforts are made to accommodate the interests of all road uses in its plans.

Another thing that could be done would be to liaise with local community groups and representatives of those affected by major construction projects to see to it that their needs are addressed through the use of things such as constructive method statements.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

Contractors liaise with planners and highway officers with regard to their development sites. I would ask that they be required to accept higher standards of safety for pedestrians and cyclists and that their compliance be monitored more effectively. Too often contractors appear to offer only a token gesture to providing a route past the works. Requirements on contractors need to go further to recognise the needs of pedestrians and cyclists as well as vehicles. The routes the lorries delivering to their sites are allowed to use should be more strictly adhered to. These lorries should be signed up to the Construction Logistics and Cycle Safety (CLOCS) standards.

# Question 6

Cycle routes which are narrow and involves sharp turns and chicanes make routes difficult or impossible for users of tricycles, handcycles and cargo bikes, impairing accessibility for the most vulnerable. Can you think of anywhere in your ward that is difficult to use on a non-standard cycle and what will you do to improve it?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

The cycle bridge with the turning on the Devonshire Road has a very sharp turn and also a big speed bump, which doesn't stop motorists from speeding. The road always has cars parked on the road and it is very difficult for cyclists as well as motorists to use the road. I have seen that the council is changing the bend on the bridge so that the turn isn't so sharp, but the rest of the road is tight even for cars to move past. I recently had a lady who uses a wheelchair approach the Green Party stating that the footpath was so awful for her that it hurt her back going down it everyday. Although we contacted the council, they didn't improve the path. I believe that if there is more emphasis on walking and cycling then the council will make those pathways better. Perhaps that road ought to be closed with bollards only to be used by cyclists and pedestrians, or become a one way street. At the very least options ought to be explored.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

On the junction between Gwydir and Milford street, as well as the one between Kingston Road and Hooper Street, there is a chicane that non-standard cycles might find difficult to navigate. Investigating if there are ways to provide more spacing for them at it and similar places could be worthwhile.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

I can’t think of specific places in Petersfield but would welcome areas for review and I would take action to get problems alleviated.

# Question 7

Protected junctions where pedestrian and bicycle traffic are fully separated from motorised traffic have been proposed by Cambridge Cycling Campaign for the Milton Road / Elizabeth Way junction. Which junctions do you think would benefit from this safety improvement within the Cambridge area?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

That's a great idea. I think that Hills Road also needs this all the way. It has a little bit of the cycle path until it disappears, it would do well to have this at the Cherry Hinton junction and Station Road too. We also need this on East Road, I know we have a little bit of a space here and there on some roads but that really isn't enough space especially on the roundabout. I understand that there is the underground space for cyclists but many cyclists so use the road. Newmarket Road also needs this and as do all the busy of the main roads.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

The one that springs to mind is the crossroads joining Gonville Place, Hills Road, Regent Street and Lensfield Road. It's a large junction and I know that cyclists have had problems there since the layout was changed a few years back. There is definite potential for safety measures like this to be implemented there.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

The Kingston St/Devonshire Rd junction with Mill Road is particularly difficult for cyclists but will largely be overcome by the use of the tunnel under the approach road to the bridge as part of the Chisolm Trail. The junction of Tenison Rd with Gt Northern Way is poorly designed and hazardous for cyclists in particular. I recently met with the planners and road engineers to review it and some improvements should result from that ahead of it becoming the busy route to the new station square in September.

# Question 8

Residential streets used by commuters to park all day for free increases traffic on already congested roads. This has an impact on cycle safety. It also means that residents of those streets may not be able to park cars outside or even near their own homes during the daytime. How would you solve this problem?

Catherine DURANCE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sharon KAUR
(Green Party)

First, I would like to make Park and Rides free again. Then I think the Congestion Charge should be brought into place. There should be no free parking allowed in Cambridge apart from Residential parking simply because it impacts the safety of cyclists and increases pollution. On a more bigger scale, with congestion charges, people may be deterred from driving their cars into the city, which will free up the roads a little more and make buses more reliable. But also as with all things, many people from outside of the city drive into Cambridge due to it being a the cheaper option. We need to ensure that it's actually more expensive. I would suggest employers paying for their employers parking in nearby car parks but this could lead to employees having to pay for parking out of their own pockets.

Daniel LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

Encouraging the use of public transport through things such as scrapping the parking fee on Park and Ride and consulting on things such as peak hour Congestion Charging that would discourage people from bringing cars into Cambridge in the first place. Both of these policies can be found in the Liberal Democrat manifesto. If there was a demand for something like a residents parking zone, these could be used to try and address this issue. There is also an opportunity in the current parking review to work with residents to produce a resident parking scheme that fits with both local needs and strategic priorities.

Richard ROBERTSON
(Labour Party)

Better bus services need to be provided (and will run better if there is less traffic on the streets) reaching out to far more villages and later into every evening. They should also provide services around the city and serve far more places of employment rather than assuming workers are city centre based. Park and Ride services should be free to park and be located in villages as well as just outside the city. Research into more wide spread parking restrictions is currently being undertaken to see if commuters can be kept from parking in residential areas in ways acceptable to local residents. Improved facilities for cycling into the city from the villages also needs much more work.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.