Elections

2016 Cambridge City Council Election: Market

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council May 2016
Polling date: Thursday 5th May 2016
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Barney BABER  (Conservative Party)
  • Tim BICK  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Danielle GREENE  (Labour Party)
  • Stuart TUCKWOOD  (Green Party)

Questions for Market ward candidates (8 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

# Question 1

Cambridge Cycling Campaign has created a guide to cycling best-practice called Making Space For Cycling, endorsed by all national cycling organisations. Do you fully support this guide, and if so, what one principle in it do you think could most effectively be applied in your ward?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I find it a very useful way of bringing good practice into one place. Very helpful.
In my ward I'd pick out the principle that "people want to cycle away from parked cars" as pretty important as it is a major hazard in the city centre. I have recently sponsored a successful highways improvement bid to turn the cycle lane in East Road into a mandatory lane with double yellow lines emphasising prohibition on parking 24/7. There are other similar opportunities.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

I have read with interest "Making Space for Cycling" and found it to be a very informative guide for improving cycling infrastructure, although I believe that there is much to be gained by also using SUSTRANS “Handbook for Cycle Friendly Design” as a complementary design guide. I note the suggestion of segregated cycle ways - as a cyclist myself I do feel safest on these. I would like to see them introduced on the re-configured Milton Road and Histon Road. I also think “floating bus stops” are of benefit for all road users and believe they are now operating successfully on Huntingdon Road and Hills Road. I feel there is a great deal to be done to create better provision for cyclists and pedestrians.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

Yes, I fully support this guide. 2 principles from the guide stand out the most for me, as a candidate for Market ward. There is a high volume of traffic on many of the streets in Market and often many heavy goods vehicles at certain periods during the day.

Often the high volume of traffic and the amount of HGV's makes cycling in the city centre feel intimidating and unsafe, despite some development of cycling infrastructure. I cycle through this area on personal business often and on my way to and from work so know how this feels.

I support the principle of having segregated cycle ways that have space between them and traffic. This would make cycling in the city centre feel a lot safer and stop the problem of having delivery vehicles or cars parking in cycle ways, forcing cyclists to go out in heavy traffic.

We propose having safe segregated cycle ways in our 2016 manifesto for cambridge.

I also believe the principle of safer junctions and minimizing conflict points will make cycling in market ward significantly safer. Often it seems there are well developed cycle ways that disappear once it comes to a junction where the is actually a higher chance of a collision. There are a few in Market Ward or on the edge that I can think of, and others around the city also.

# Question 2

What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

In my ward, I have recently achieved a project to prevent the vehicle rat-run from Adam & Eve Street to Burleigh Street which jeopardised the widely used school run along Burleigh Street to St Matthew's School. It remains a campaigning priority to investigate alternative sites for the long distance coach station, which creates a major hazard around Parkside School.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

I have young children who are not yet of school age, but I think it is so important to encourage children to cycle or walk to school - it encourages fitness and a sense of independence for older children. For this reason I think that extending the “Bikeability” schemes to children in the lower years at secondary schools should be considered. It is great to see large numbers of children cycling, walking and using public transport to get to school but there are still too many children being dropped off from cars causing conflict and competition for space and danger to children as they arrive and leave school. Cambridge already has a high volume of traffic so I feel that parents should be discouraged from dropping their children off by car. I would like to see “no car zones” around schools as has been introduced in some towns.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

As above, safer segregated cycle lanes with room between them and traffic will make cycling safer and less intimidating for all, but especially children.

I also believe restricting the entry of HGVs into the city centre makes cycling feel significantly more pleasant and less scary. We have outlined this proposal also in our cambridge 2016 manifesto.

As the Greens have stated previously, driver behavior is also a very important factor in how safe cycling is, and feels, which is key to getting more people onto their bikes. We would like to press for more cycling awareness training for drivers on local buses and in local government. The City Council could lead by example by ensuring drivers working for them do this and encourage local bus companies to do so also.

# Question 3

What experience do you and your family have of cycling? Do you have any different concerns about younger or older family members cycling than you do yourself?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I am a regular cyclist and have encouraged my children to be the same.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

I have always commuted to university lectures and later to work by bicycle across the city. Now that I have two infants my opportunities to cycle have lessened, but I always try to cycle where possible.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

I have used cycling as my principal form of transport for maybe around 5 or 6 years now. While a student and a support worker in Glasgow I cycled (and kept very fit) all over the city to get to my shifts. Glasgow's a very hilly city and doesn't have the best cycling infrastructure in many places so it definitely made me appreciate how flat and relatively cycle safe Cambridge is.

I cycle from home to Addenbrooke's most days for my work. I bought my girlfriend a bicycle for her christmas last year and she's really enjoying using it to get around Cambridge as well. I do worry about her safety though and am always telling her to be careful when cycling anywhere!

# Question 4

Secure cycle parking has been fixed in the short term at Cambridge Railway Station but is still a major problem for people travelling to work or to shop in the city centre. Where do you think that additional cycle parking can be provided in the city centre?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

When I led the City Council, in addition to the 600+ additional on-street cycle places we created, I launched a study to find a location for further covered parking. Work started on taking back car parking places which had been allocated to the magistrates, but I understand this has subsequently got bogged down. If this is not going to happen I would like to see a serious investigation of Post Office Terrace.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

I am pleased about the leaps forward in cycle parking provision at the station and I believe that the City Council has done a splendid job in providing additional cycle parking throughout the city centre but demand still far outstrips supply of secure places to park bikes.

The viability of taking some of the car parking spaces in Lion Yard Car Park could be explored along with investigating a cycle parking area under Market Square. Some spaces used for on street car parking should be changed to be used for cycle parking. Park Street Car Park should have expanded cycle parking provision.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

As part of a wider strategy to encourage travelling by public transport or by walking or cycling we would gradually reduce the amount of private car parking space provided by the city council in the centre.

As the number of car parking spaces are reduced at the main city centre car parks these could be turned over to cycle storage.

In new housing and business developments cycling storage space should be included that is secure and easily accessible. This should be considered the norm in new developments. Some of those around Kingsley Walk have very good storage and I'd like to see other new ones have a similar good level.

# Question 5

Recent construction in the city, such as on Abbey Street, Milton Road and at the University Arms have closed routes or removed cycle space. What would you do to ensure that cycle routes remain open and safe as construction grows the city?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I think much more explicit planning conditions should be imposed, and would look to a more proactive approach from the highways authority in their input to the planning process,

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

All construction companies should be required to be signed up for CLOCS before they are allowed to operate in the Cambridge area, and the needs of cyclists and pedestrians should be prioritised over vehicles when roads are narrowed or obstructed when building work and road improvements are being undertaken.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

Genuine consultation with people and the cycling campaign in areas where development is occurring would be the first step to ensure the council understands the need of cyclists using the routes around the development and the acceptability of diversions.

I would give high priority to the needs of cyclists when implementing diversions, and keep in mind the principles of the 'making space for cycling', so that any that need to be implemented ensure cyclists are kept safe and able to use them.

# Question 6

Cycle routes which are narrow and involves sharp turns and chicanes make routes difficult or impossible for users of tricycles, handcycles and cargo bikes, impairing accessibility for the most vulnerable. Can you think of anywhere in your ward that is difficult to use on a non-standard cycle and what will you do to improve it?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

The 90 degree left turn from St Andrew's Street into Downing Street followed by the very narrow physical "neck" demarcating the start of the Downing Street contra-flow lane needs redesigning. I would welcome input from the cycling campaign on this. There are many attendant issues, none making the situation easier, including regular broken glass on the lane and insufficiently clear pedestrian lighting controls.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

Although I've never used a cargo-style bike, there are narrow cycle routes along St Andrews St. Also going from Regent Street onto Parkers Piece.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

Getting across the cattle grids on midsummer common would be a challenge i suppose, as would navigating the entrance to sidney street from st andrews street. Although I have not used any of these forms of cycling so am not speaking from a position of too much knowledge on this.

I'd like to hear from people who do so, so that we can make informed choices about improving any issues that do exist in market ward.

# Question 7

Protected junctions where pedestrian and bicycle traffic are fully separated from motorised traffic have been proposed by Cambridge Cycling Campaign for the Milton Road / Elizabeth Way junction. Which junctions do you think would benefit from this safety improvement within the Cambridge area?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I am concerned about the staggered junctions along Trumpington Road/Street with Fen Causeway and Lensfield Road. I do not know if these dual mini-roundabouts lend themselves to this approach, but am interested to know. It was disappointing that these were not included in the recent clutch of cycling projects funded by the City Deal and I would try and give priority to it at the next opportunity.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

A junction which requires a radical improvement is the roundabout where Fen Causeway meets Trumpington Road. This major hazard for cyclists is a challenge for infrastructure designers to come up with a solution that will improve safety for all users.
Elizabeth Way, East Road and Newmarket Road roundabout is another major hazard for cyclists to negotiate.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

On my commute I find the junction where Gonville Place meets Regent Street very problematic. The narrowing of the road while still including three lanes for motorists mean there is no space for cycles and often you are squeezed dangerously close to the kerb by cars trying to pass. I'd like to see some improvements to that junction, perhaps looking at narrowing it to one lane of motor traffic on either side with increased separated space for cyclists.

The roundabout where King St, Jesus Lane, Maid's Causeway and Victoria Avenue meet also doesn't feel particularly safe to me when passing on my bike, so I would like to explore how to make passing that easier for cyclists.

# Question 8

Residential streets used by commuters to park all day for free increases traffic on already congested roads. This has an impact on cycle safety. It also means that residents of those streets may not be able to park cars outside or even near their own homes during the daytime. How would you solve this problem?

Barney BABER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I would take two strategic steps to reduce demand for this kind of parking: firstly scrap the Park and Ride Parking charge and attempt to relaunch the purpose and advantage of using it. Secondly introduce a demand management regime for peak time car use in the city, which I am frustrated and disappointed has been slow to come because of weakness and prevarication of those who should be leading. For particularly affected neighbourhoods, I think residents' should be agree new residents' parking schemes and if my ward wasn't 100% residents parking already, I would want to facilitate that process.

Danielle GREENE
(Labour Party)

Cambridge has a lot of commuters, and there must be a balance between making the city accessible and the needs of the residents. Park and Ride schemes must be encouraged to keep traffic out of the city and other means of entering, such as cycling. Another potential solution is Residents parking schemes or single yellow lines with one hour prohibited parking in the middle of the day. But of course, residents need to be consulted on the measures that can be implemented in their areas.

Stuart TUCKWOOD
(Green Party)

Our 2016 manifesto for Cambridge includes a specific commitment to work towards ending free non-resident parking in the city.

We need urgently to reduce congestion and air pollution in Cambridge by creating disincentives to drive into the city while at the same time making it easier and cheaper for people to use public transport, cycle or walk.

We would also phase in a fair congestion charge (not for cyclists as one idea recently suggested!), with exemptions for those who cannot use any other means of travel and any others necessary. This would reduce the volume of traffic coming into the city, making it safer and more pleasant for cyclists, and would give us the funds to make other forms of transport easier and cheaper.

In particular, raising the funds to remove the parking charges at the park and ride sites around the city is necessary to make this a good option for people commuting.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.