Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: Romsey

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Dave BAIGENT  (Labour Party)
  • Simon LEE  (Conservative Party)
  • Megan PARRY  (Green Party)
  • Paul Stuart SAUNDERS  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for Romsey ward candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

I completed the consultation to support these spaces and they are an important part of the jigsaw.
What is unfortunate is that so many main arteries into the city are not wide enough to support protected routes with two way traffic and so by default many, like Mill Road, which I use every day leave cyclists 'unprotected'.
New solutions need to be considered and these are more likely to come through consultation. They has to be an answer for roads like Mill Road where the estimated risk of travelling by bike must make people wary of cycling. If we could solve this then more people will cycle and cars will reduce.
Someone needs to grasp the mettle here and get people to talk to each other about a way forward in these danger zones. Then there needs to be a trial.
Maybe some new faces on the council and a new administration will make the difference. ;)

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

Yes absolutely, there's plenty of scope all over Cambridge to have this sort of scheme or similar.

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, I support these where there is adequate space.The challenge in Cambridge is that so few roads are wide enough. Whenever major road projects are envisaged I would like to see a real examination of the space allocated to motor, cycle and pedestrians. Too often in the past the solution has been mixing bike and foot traffic as a quick fix. In Romsey the only roads I'd imagine being suitable for consideration are Perne Road, Brooks Road, perhaps Coldham's Lane. However they are not without their issues.

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

Increasing the number of one way streets may be a way forward.
There needs to be a debate about this street by street with a Czar responsible for coordination.
We need to involve people and win the argument.
Protecting cyclists will inevitably lead to more people giving up cars and cycling thus reducing traffic and increasing safety at the same time.
We need to bring on board the next generation so that they automatically default to using a bike but for parents to encourage this we need safe routes!
Win Win. :)

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

Its a fine balance, I think more phasing of traffic lights at peak times more CCTV to catch offenders, re organisation of road junctions to suit all, a re assessment of roads that are currently closed to traffic might make sense to open these during peak times.
Bus lanes open to all after lunch on Sat Sun all day and some reserved for Bus and cycles only, but defiantly more dedicated cycle paths away from traffic. A train station at the Science Park.

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

This approach has been very successful in the City Centre. Romsey has measures to prevent larger through-traffic of trucks in some areas but still suffers from a significant volume of other traffic using rat-runs. But local residents opinions must be respected. Are there not other approaches for side streets? I'd like to see more home zone and shared spaces. Not necessarily banning cars but putting them further down the hierarchy in residential streets.

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

Parents need to consider not using their cars to do the school run and this may happen if we persuaded schools to be more active in this area.
If schools held meetings with parents and children in support of a bike or walk to school campaign then this could be very important and could also bring on the next generation as cyclists.
Discussions with schools and parents could also lead to them being active in asking for a ban on parking during peak times outside their school and this would then be by consensus.
Riding to school also has to be safe and discussions should take place with parents on how best to do this.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

Defiantly fewer cars outside school, getting parents to walk and cycle to school would make a huge help. Bring back Cycle proficiency test 20mph limit

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

We do need to improve the safety (and the perception of risk) for those cycling to school. It would be good to see more of cycling, there are health and social benefits. If more families did cycle perhaps that would reduce risk as the number of cars at school gates decreased. But we do need to make cycling to school safer in other ways and making in more obvious where people can cycle. This will mean a mixture of techniques: parking restrictions, dual use paths (where there is no alternative), and, perhaps, innovative coloured road finishes that indicate (to everyone) the areas where special care is needed!

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

Making cycling safer is key here. I have been involved in one of these schemes and they are antagonistic. People need to be convinced and this can be done by proper consultation.
If we make cycling safer and get more people onto bikes then car use decreases and should lead to a reduction of cars as people realise they dont need a second car or stop having a car at all. Space then will materialise to create bike parks but it is very much a chicken and egg and people need to be convinced that it is safe to ride to work/shop/play/school.
More Bike parks are needed everywhere full stop.
Strategically placed bike racks could stop people driving onto the pavement and we should perhaps have a trial of this.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

No this I don't agree with, I personally think we could use some of Parkers Piece around the edges, the train station has so much unused space used for staff parking, utilise this or a larger car and cycle park, the station is a mess and dangerous. Planners on new builds should be thinking about space for cycles enforced by local council.

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

One of the great attractions of cycling is that you can do it point-to-point unlike a car where there is, invariably, still a walk once you have eventually parked. It's what makes city cycling faster than driving.
The current scheme to increase cycle parking across the city centre is therefore very welcome. But the secure central bike parking also has it's place, much better for the long-stayer or commuter. We need both types. I would support converting some parking for cycle use, BUT if we are to reduce car parking we must also improve public transport! These things do not exist in isolation of each other.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

Who could argue against this?
Sensitively though, and in consultation with the people of Cambridge.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

Yes very much so, if I'm walking my dog I keep getting bullied by cyclists if I'm cycling walkers and dogs just walk out in front of you.

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

An easy one. Yes, definitely.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

Speed kills and in cities and towns it doesn't even save time.
The best form of compliance is the motorist who actually complies.
By travelling at 20 mph you restrict the speed of all the traffic behind you.
The naysayers who argue about enforcement will not work so we should not have a 20mph limit have never scrapped a dead body off the road or attended an accident in which people have been injured because of speed.
There needs to be a graphic campaign about stopping distances and people need to be convinced.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

We should have 20mph on all small residential streets, speed camera's great, sleeping policemen I'm not so keen on. A lot of the time you cant get above 20mph anyway

We could do with more patience and respect from all of us, not sure how you should implement this !!

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

I have supported this for quite a while. I look forward to our residential areas regaining their essential residential character. However, we must ensure any scheme has local support, so local consultation matters greatly. I would be surprised if the remaining two areas do not welcome the scheme: and the local knowledge expressed through the consultations will allow the implementation to take account of local conditions and wishes. One tool to encourage compliance are those mobile speed indicators. Education not enforcement. Using embarrassment anyway. I understand some are being purchased as part of the scheme roll out. These signs tell people graphically when they exceed the limit giving instant feedback, and highlighting unacceptable speed so all can see. I hope that Area Committees will be able to task them to problem areas. I'd certainly like to see them deployed in Mill Road occasionally!

# Question 7

On-street residential cycle parking is being brought in on one street in Romsey following a campaign. This follows some on-street cycle parking installed near pubs. Do you support further on-street cycle parking in residential areas?

Dave BAIGENT
(Labour Party)

This has caused difficulties and antagonised relations between residents.
Cyclists need to be able to park their bikes and in some places this is really difficult and could dissuade people from cycling.
Consultation is key here, if cycling is safer then there will be less need of cars and parking and more space for bikes.

Simon LEE
(Conservative Party)

Yes outside the pubs, and I think we could do with more of the type used in Romsey around some of the shops. Remember Cambridge is very difficult to get about if you use a wheel chair, we need to keep streets clear of obstructions

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Paul Stuart SAUNDERS
(Liberal Democrat)

Early days: I'm really interested to see how this long-term trial pans out as far as public opinion goes. Interestingly one argument, seldom used, for the on-street cycle parking is to reduce cycle parking on the narrow pavements in Romsey's terraces. This is not simply a narrow car vs. bike argument: parents with buggies and wheelchair users may be real beneficiaries. Many folks have both cars and bikes and need both for different travel needs. Commuting to work and, perhaps, cycling to the town centre. We need to look at this from a wide perspective. For example encouraging use of car clubs could release pressure on car parking and free up more space on-road for cycles, which in turn helps those using our pavements !

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.