Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: Market

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Alex BOYD  (Conservative Party)
  • Maximillian FRIES  (Green Party)
  • Dan RATCLIFFE  (Labour Party)
  • Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for Market ward candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

Although these proposed measures do not affect Market Ward directly I welcome the County Council consulting the public on the issue. Should the proposed measures prove to be popular with motorists, cyclists and the public alike while leading to increased safety and reduced danger to cyclists (especially those going to and from schools in this area) then they should be given serious consideration.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

I strongly support those schemes because I believe that for far too long our infrastructure has been built with primarily motor traffic in mind. We, as cyclists and citizens, have to stand up to re-balance this relationship, and in the light of climate change, massively support low-carbon transport such as cycling and walking. I especially welcome the public consultations on different options for protected spaces that allow citizens to have their say and get involved in the development of their areas. In my ward, the situation in Lensfield Road appears to me similarly dangerous and worrying as on Hills Road and clearly needs attention from the council.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

I support the schemes for Hills Road and Huntingdon Road particularly as they are wide roads (especially compared to many in the city centre) and traffic can often be particularly quick. I think care must be taken to avoid conflict between all different road users and so am glad to see that the cycle route past "floating" bus stops contain measures to reduce the potential risk of high-speed collisions with pedestrians alighting busses which could be dangerous for both cyclist and pedestrian! This scheme will also reduce the potential for and fear of collisions on pavements, a major concern for many local residents.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

I can't see any cases in the city centre which Market Ward largely comprises though I would like more measures to persuade motorists to leave space by kerbs for cycling, mainly by adding advisory cycle lanes, e.g. on Gonville Place northbound

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

These measures need to be approached on a case by case basis, with attention given to specific instances where this might or might not be appropriate and/or needed. In addition, the proposed measures should be examined in light of the effect they would have on the wider area, as well as taking into account the views of local residents.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

I fully support exclusion of motor traffic from residential areas for all those motorists that do not live or work there. Coming from a small town with little traffic myself, I know how great it is for parents and kids just to open the door and play on the street. In the future I would like to see a general reduction of motor traffic in all parts of Cambridge which only can achieve by improving public transport in and around Cambridge and to make it more affordable. Encouraging commuters to use public transport rather than their cars e.g. by a measure like the congestion charge in London are options that I am generally in favour of.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

The historic city centre streets are not suited to high levels of through traffic and congestion is already too severe. I want to see the development of a City Centre Transport Strategy that would encourage more journeys being made by bike, bus or on foot and will add my voice to Labour colleagues if elected. The City Deal monies present an opportunity to improve junctions and safer routes for both cyclists and pedestrians. I support the closing of streets at certain points to stop rat-running as long as we do not inadvertently create access issues for less mobile residents.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

All such requests have already been implemented in the city centre but new possibilities do occur and two such schemes in Market Ward are in the pipeline for the coming year at my initiative, at Prospect Row/Elm St and a weight limit in King St.

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

Safety of kids cycling to school is essential. Sensible measures such as education campaigns, enforcement of rules at known danger points by the police, wearing of safety equipment and practical road safety measures should all be used in concert to make cycling to school as safe as possible.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

The already discussed protected spaces for cyclists as well as pedestrians will do a great deal to improve the safety of the children. In addition, a better and more affordable public transport will allow decreasing the amount of motor traffic, especially of those parents dropping their children off at school with too often humongous cars in the tiny alleys of my ward. For the latter problem, I think that the council should also approach local schools to develop schemes to encourage the use of public transport to get to school. Moreover, intelligent adjustment of traffic light phases, e.g. on Hills Road, would allow the often large crowds of children to pass the streets together. I observe dangerous crossings due to short green phases every day.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

If we make cycling more attractive and safe for cyclists and pedestrians we will reduce the number of school runs being done by car and this can only be a good thing. Improvements on routes to and from schools should be looked at as a priority. Being able to walk or cycle to school will also be good for children's health and self-confidence.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

City Centre schools seem to be well supported by routes for cycling but need more cycle parking, esp. at Parkside. My granddaughter uses the Park Street cycle park, well located for her school

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

Yes, agree with this, I am sure I am not the only one who frequently has trouble finding a spot for their bike in town. This should be done alongside other measures, such as promoting the use of park and ride facilities to ensure that shops in the centre are not negatively affected by reduced footfall.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

Yes, I would absolutely support this. With a good park-ride-bus system and at least in the centre a good bus system in general, there should be no need to travel by car directly into the centre, especially for leisure activities. This space can then be freed for cycle parking.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

Although the cycle park at the station is not predicted to be opened until the end of 2015 at the earliest the extra 3,000 capacity this will provide is great news. I support the plan to convert some car bays to cycle parking at the Grand Arcade and we will investigate sites for a potential second central cycle park.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

A balance had to be maintained where car parking is in very short supply, as in the Kite, but opportunities for extra cycle parking should be explored there, e.g. in spare space in Adam and Eve Street car park.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

If undertaken sensitively, then yes. However, I would need to see specific plans and hear views of local residents and cyclists before committing to anything. Clearly, there are problems on Midsommer Common in particular but I would not say this is necessarily down exclusively to problems of path width but rather cycle speed. Whether or not wider paths without cycle lanes would encourage cyclists to go faster on them also remains an open question. Whatever happens pragmatic solutions that allow both cyclists and pedestrians to use paths on green spaces safely should be prioritised.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

I would support such widening and separation in general, but as implicated in the question, in a sensitive manner to avoid sealing even more of our green spaces with tarmac. In any case, there should be a consultation of local residents and users of the path before making any changes to include all possible views and find a common solution.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

Absolutely! We must avoid concreting over the cherished green spaces in the heart of the city but I have long been calling for delineated cycle & foot paths where space allows. Residents in the Brunswick area regularly tell me about near misses and collisions with young and old pedestrians and sometimes pets as well. We need to come up with schemes that make commuting across Midsummer Common and Jesus Green easier and safer for all involved, while maintaining the character of the area.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. It is work I am currently engaged in for Midsummer Common.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

In Market Ward almost all road are 20mph, unless they are classified as main roads. I know that residents around Maids Causeway/Newmarket Road are pleased that this is now a 20mph zone. As for other areas, a case by case approach should be adopted and should it increase road safety, respect the wishes of local residents and motorists while not leading to increased traffic problems elsewhere speed limits can be considered. Concerning compliance, first of all signs should be introduced and if problems persist random police spot checks might help.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

20mphs zones are essential for more road safety, to reduce congestion by encourage alternative ways of transport and in general for creating areas that are quieter and less polluted. The recent smog clouds over Cambridge have demonstrated the necessity to change something now, and introducing 20mphs zones all over the city is a fast and cost-effective way to start with. To enforce compliance, mobile speed controls are an option, as well as physical measures to slow down the traffic without endangering cyclists and pedestrians.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

I have consistently supported the introduction of 20mph zones in residential areas and welcome the start of a city-wide scheme. The situation with Maid's Causeway/Newmarket Road was bordering on farcical with residents locally facing continual disruption and real danger from speeding HGVs and some car drivers. It is important that we signpost extensively especially on routes into the city centre and am glad that the police are now moving towards increased enforcement. We should also look what possibilities exist to re-engineer some roads.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

Almost all of Market Ward is already 20mph. One exception (Severn Place) is an anomaly which should be corrected with redevelopment; the others are classified main roads on the edges of the ward.

# Question 7

On-street residential cycle parking is being brought in on one street in Romsey following a campaign. This follows some on-street cycle parking installed near pubs. Do you support further on-street cycle parking in residential areas?

Alex BOYD
(Conservative Party)

As mentioned in my response to question 4 there is a problem with space in some ares of the city and residential cycle parking can be one possible solution, provided it does not lead to obstruction of thoroughfares.

Maximillian FRIES
(Green Party)

Every cyclist knows how hard it is to find a save and legitimate space to leave the bike and the chaotic cycle “piles” are unbearable not only in Romsey, but all over Cambridge. I support to install more on-street cycle parking. Again, this should be done in consultation with the residents of the area that know best were it is needed the most.

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

I would support on-street parking being introduced in areas where there is clear local resident support. Whilst we need to make sure we don't put further obstacles in the way of disabled residents accessing their homes and the historic city centre there is clearly scope for improvements.

Colin Richard ROSENSTIEL
(Liberal Democrat)

I have recently surveyed residents in one Kite street on the idea of new on-street cycle parking not involving loss of any car parking. There was almost no support. Where there is, maybe on Regent Terrace for example, it could be worth pursuing. Some pubs could do with cycle parking provision on their walls for improved security. I would support City Council financial support for this if requested.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.