Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: East Chesterton

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Peter BURKINSHAW  (UK Independence Party)
  • Daniel Jacob JOHN  (Conservative Party)
  • Zoe O'CONNELL  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Peter Harry POPE  (Green Party)
  • Peter SARRIS  (Labour Party)

Questions for East Chesterton ward candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No, no

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

Having viewed some of the information on proposed separated cycle lanes, I am generally in favour of the proposal.

I have slight concerns about pedestrians crossing the cycle lane and buses causing other traffic to wait behind it.

As commented below, I would be keen to see some protection on roads near the new Science Park station.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

My answer to question 2 (Preferring to completely separate motor and cycle/pedestrian traffic) is relevant here, but there are a number of areas in the ward that would benefit more from protected space. In particular, Green End Road is wide enough to warrant a complete redesign especially the section from the Nuffield Road roundabout to Milton Road. We’ve submitted proposals to the County S106 process, and Ian Manning, the Liberal Democrat County Councillor for East Chesterton, is investigating whether these proposals can be funded via the station project.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

I fully support these schemes.
Other desirable examples would be Milton Road, Kings Hedges Road and Gilbert Road.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

Yes I fully support these schemes and would like to see more of them introduced where roads are wide enough. I would consult with residents and stakeholders on options in East Chesterton

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No, no.
Motorists pay for the roads cyclists don't.

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

I think the removal of through traffic can be positive in certain situations but it is highly dependent on the area.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

In general, solutions that completely separate motor and cycle/pedestrian traffic (i.e. removing through motor traffic) are my first choice, creating one route for cars and another for more vulnerable traffic although this can be much harder to achieve than simply creating protected space. The route along the river provides the best example of traffic separation, including Riverside Bridge and Cutter Ferry but there are numerous existing small "cut-throughs" that could be better advertised for both pedestrians and cyclists.

The Liberal Democrat policy enacted by the County Council to allow experimental, time-limited highway schemes, as has been implemented in New York, will help deal with some of the "what if..." worries people may have over proposals to close a road permanently.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Restrictions on motor traffic are welcome. However it should go hand in hand with reduced car ownership. The greatest blight on our environment is the streets choked with parked cars. Did you know that a typical car spends 95% of its (very expensive ) life standing still? What a shocking waste of resources and road space.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

Yes I am in favour of more motor traffic restrictions in residential streets

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

Parents should accompany them.

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

In East Chesterton the traffic flow around the Shirley is often problematic. I'd like to evaluate whether it would be possible to connect Nuffield Road to Milton road, particularly for the commercial traffic. In addition I'd like to see more enforcement around schools in the mornings to prevent roads being blocked by traffic.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

There is no one magic solution to this as it depends very much on local road conditions. I have spoken to parents who live just meters from the Shirley School who are worried about safety, simply because the most dangerous area is the crossing outside the school. High-visibility policing and parking controls at peak times would reduce some of the worst, most anti-social driving that leads to problems.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

http://www.walkingschoolbus.org/
The first stage of improving safety is to teach defensive mobility. This is a vital element of education, with the responsibility falling on parents, either individually or as a community initiative.
Stage 2 is a defensible zone at school entrances with no parking, pedestrian priority, 10mph speed limit and high-vis cordons that can be drawn across the carriageway by parents.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

Protected space routes for cyclists should be introduced on roads leading to schools. I am a strong supporter of the CCC proposal with respect to Nuffield Road, to stop heavy vehicles, for example, racing past the Shirley

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No. Most car parking is in multi-story car parks anyway.

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

I support greater cycle parking in the Cambridge city centre though I would need to see data on car park utilisation before suggesting that car parking should be reduced.

I would be keen to research how often cycle parks are swept for abandoned cycles to keep parking as free as possible.

I would also want to consider double height cycle parking similar to that used at the station where it could be in keeping with the local architecture.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

Converting car spaces to cycle parking, particularly in existing multi-storey car parks, is certainly something that can be done. However, one of the more convenient aspects of cycling is able to park closer to your destination and there may not always be a car space that can be converted. As well as using public land to provide cycle parking spaces, planning requirements can be used to ensure adequate cycle parking is provided by private business too - both in the centre of Cambridge and elsewhere near shops and businesses city-wide.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

I generally manage to find somewhere in town but more cycle parking is desirable. Extra provision at Drummer Street is now viable with easy walking through Christ's Lane.
A cycle park under the market square would be most desirable - perhaps it could be done using a cut and cover technique without too much disruption?

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

After full consultation with residents and businesses, it may be necessary to replace some car parking spaces with cycle parking spaces, but disabled parking spots must be protected. I support the secured parking scheme in the Grand Arcade, and would be keen on more such facilities if City Deal funding is available. Given how packed existing cycle parking spaces are, there is clearly a need for more. Cycle parking spaces will need to be carefully monitored to make sure they don't get clogged up with abandonned bikes.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No opinion.

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

I would support widening of paths in principle, although this will need to be weighed against cost and disruption to the commons and greens.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, in principle and as you state, undertaken with appropriate environmental sensitivity.

In general, widening routes will increase safety for all. However, we do need to ensure we do not bring cyclists and pedestrians into conflict with each other - particularly vulnerable, less mobile or younger pedestrians. This is often caused by lack of space or confusing markings, particularly blind corners near slopes where cyclists may be travelling at speed, encouraged by wider routes, so "wider is better" may not be the blanket answer in all cases.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Sustrans Route 51 on Stourbridge Common is a good width. I would not wish to see anything on a larger scale. The broken state of many paths is a further incentive for renewal and the camber on the long path across Midsummer Common is excessive.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

The cycling and pedestrian paths across some of our green spaces are coming under increasingly heavy use, and I support widening where necessary. As someone who is partially sighted, I am very sensitive to this issue.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

I know of nobody in Union Lane who was asked. I think 20mph is unnecesary

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

East Chesterton is an area where the 20mph zone has already been rolled out. I am in favour of the speed limit in principle, as often 20mph is the only sensible speed to drive on the narrower residential roads. However even when the speed limit was higher, people sped (particularly along roads such as Fen Road) and I am skeptical of the impact that the lower speed limit will have on these drivers.

As such, my focus would be to evaluate whether speed calming measures are sensible as well as to try to increase police or possibly PCSO presence with a focus on those flagrantly breaking the speed limit.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, I support 20mph limits. Effective police enforcement of these limits is a concern, and something I am sure councillors will continue to keep a close eye on - it has been set as a priority by North Area Committee again.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Twenty's plenty for me.
Its a big change of culture for many motorists so education is very important. All public service vehicles should be decorated with 20 symbols and maps of the 20mph boundary.
An extensive, 2 year promotion through the Cambridge News and on Council websites should start now.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

Yes I support the scheme and its extension, but we need to make sure it is enforceable and enforced by working with the Police. We also need better signage for those entering Cambridge to make it clear they are entering a 20MPH zone.

# Question 7

The only cycle access to the new Science Park Station from the west will be the cycleway along the busway. For Cowley Road, the most direct route from the Science Park entrance or from the village of Milton has only a substandard shared-use pavement planned. For the latter, cyclists will have to move across the path of left-turning lorries in order to enter the station; the same is on the access from East Chesterton through Nuffield Road. Do you support our aim to make the area around the new station and the Science Park more permeable and safer for walking and cycling? Do you have any specific suggestions?

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No opinion
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The following additional comments were made by this candidate:

How about getting the cyclists to ride on the road instead of hazarding pedestrians on footpaths where there is no marked cycle lane.
Come to the end of Union Lane at the High Street corner about 5pm and watch the cyclists come up the pavement on Chapel Street. Across the pedestrian crossing and onto the pavement to turn into Union Lane.

Daniel Jacob JOHN
(Conservative Party)

I think that more thought should be taken around the new junction for the Science Park station and that if possible a separate cycle lane should be investigated, similar to the proposed schemes for Hills road and Huntingdon road.

I would be in favour of the former access road being converted to a cycle lane if this can be agreed with Network Rail.

Zoe O'CONNELL
(Liberal Democrat)

There has been no final decision made on how any station entrances will work, only on the location of possible entrances. The local liaison forum is being chaired by LibDem Cllr Ian Manning, who has worked to keep the planning consent as flexible as possible so that there is time for discussion with residents on the best way forward before any firm plans are agreed.

I am keen to work with Ian over the coming months and years to ensure station access meets the needs of local residents and is accessible by all modes of transport from multiple directions, rather than only accessible by people from further afield. We are already making progress here, as early indications are that the county is changing it's mind over the guided-bus only access to the station, to make it available to local buses too.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Cowley Road is perhaps the best opportunity in the City to create world class facilities for cyclists, even to the extent of providing wind and weather protection along the route with a bridge over Milton Road.
Permeability is an excellent objective, however, the Bramblefield Nature reserve should be excluded from the commuter crush.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

Yes, I was a very early signature to the petition re. Nuffield Road. We also need to be alert, however, to the need to preserve and protect Bramblesfield, in accordance with the clearly expressed wishes of local residents and assurances that have been given to them in public.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.