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Question 21 - we asked:

We are seeking a trial of a new type of cycle provision in the city - 'hybrid cycle lanes', as used in Holland and Germany. These are 2-3m wide, on-road but with a degree of separation from other vehicles. They combine the best aspects of both off-road and on-road cycle lanes but without the downsides of both. The picture on our website illustrates the concept. What do you feel about this idea, and is there anywhere in your ward where you think these could be tried?

We asked this question in all 16 wards, namely: Abbey, Arbury, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, East Chesterton, Girton, Histon & Impington, King's Hedges, Market, Newnham, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Romsey, Trumpington, West Chesterton.

33 of the 71 candidates (46%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

Hybrid cycle lanes are excellent, particularly where bicycles are given equal priorities to road users. However their nature means that something must give, either in road space, or pavement area, and so each case must be considered on its own merits. In Romsey, whilst Coldham's lane in particular could be considered for such provision, my biggest concern is cycling (as I do) on Mill road and over the railway bridge.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

This type of cycle lane would be a significant improvement over the often inadequate cycle lanes found in Cambridge (often worse than nothing) and would also be better than shared-use cycle/bus lanes, which can be intimidating for cyclists and can encourage unsafe overtaking by buses, or shared-use cycle/pedestrian paths which are intimidating for pedestrians and both dangerous and impeding to cyclists. It would also allow cycling speeds to be increased.

It is difficult, however, to see where this form of cycle facility could be used on Cambridge's narrow roads without taking away vital road space from buses and other motor vehicles, particularly given the levels of growth planned for the Cambridge fringes. I would be interested to know of any specific locations that the campaign had in mind for Cambridge and its area.

Donald Fisher DOUGLAS
(Conservative Party)

Yes - I think it has merit. Hills Road is the obvious place in the Ward to trial it with its on and off road cycle lanes - although it may be better done after the Bridge work is complete. Please note that I would not want the green verge to be lost so the hybrid lane would need to be roadside.

Peter Norman HASE
(Conservative Party)

I agree and would consider this option as part of a package which includes the review of our town planning. I worked in the Netherlands for over a year and endorse the approach taken with well thought out cycle routes.

Christopher John HOWELL
(Conservative Party)

Good idea in principle, but the fundamental problem is that of road space - current Cambridge roads are just too narrow in almost all cases - there is competition from other modes of transport and there would be significant opposition if the plans involved loss of trees/verges or parking spaces. Taken together, lack of car parking and related problems (mangled verges, parking near junctions, cost of installing dropped kerbs to allow off road parking etc) is already just about the number one complaint from Coleridge residents when asked without prompting for the biggest problems in the local area, so it is unrealistic to think it will be acceptable to lose further parking spaces.

New developments however are an entirely different matter, and hybrid lanes are the type of cycle facility that should be encouraged as part of comprehensive measures needed in new developments to make sure there is sufficient transport infrastructure of all types.

Sheila LAWLOR
(Conservative Party)

I'm very much in favour of any intiative to improve safety for cyclists.

Steven James MASTIN
(Conservative Party)

Supportive of this idea. Chesterton Road would be a good place to start.

Keith Alexander GARRETT
(Green Party)

Where there is enough space and constant car flow has to be allowed they appear an excellent solution. I think they could be tried on Brooks Road and Coldham's Lane.

Stephen Roger LAWRENCE
(Green Party)

On the routes I use frequently at the moment (Shire Hall-Trinity St- Kings P - Trumpington Rd - Hauxton) no locations spring to mind, but certainly the idea should be tested out. There might be a conflict with loss of verges. North part of Histon Rd? Milton Road? Station Road?

Teal Richard RILEY
(Green Party)

The Coton cycle path should be the standard. I have cycled in Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark and it is disheartening to return to the UK. The Histon-Girton cycleway is adequate, but at 1.3m in far too narrow for cyclists to pass safely, particularly if they have trailers for example. The Council missed a trick in going to the significant effort to provide a cycleway and then making it sub standard.

Margaret Elizabeth WRIGHT
(Green Party)

I've tripped on these in Brussels and in Rotterdam..because I wasn't used to them. I found them quite dangerous as a pedestrian. If these were introduced in Cambridge there would have to be plenty of education about this change in road space. I think they would be a great improvement for cyclists with the above proviso.

James Christopher YOUD
(Green Party)

I would certainly be in favour of the implimention of 'Hybrid Lanes' where pratical. I have seen many examples of them and they seem to be good in allowing both experienced and unexperienced cyclists along the same route thanks to its width and distance from fast flowing traffic.
I certainly believe that Milton Road could greatly benefit from these by removing the southbound bus lane. I believe this would increase cycling to the Science parks being a more direct route than any of the existing. However provision would also have to be given to buses and this would need to be carefully considered.
Campkin Road and its spurs could also be considered for smaller scale versions of the lane.

Douglas DE LACEY
(Independent)

In general I think it a great idea. A high priority here is the Girton-Oakington-Histon shared use path, which the County has just declared "safe" for schoolchildren. I'm fighting for a reversal of that decision, and for a proper design of the path: a hybrid lane here would be excellent.

John HIPKIN
(Independent)

Could certainly be tried along the Madingley Road or Huntingdon Road, but don't know how well such 'hybrid cycle lanes' mix with pedestrians, bus stops and retaining green verges and avenues of trees!

More pressure needs to be put on the County over the suspension of the proposed cycle path from Madingley Park and Ride to Queen's Road. This seems to have been shelved since the TIF proposals were mooted. It involved reclaiming highway land to the boundaries of residential properties running from the Madingley Park and Ride site as far as Queen's Road. It would have included significant loss of hedgerows and greenery and resulted in a very wide feel to Madingley Road. Also felling of trees near Churchill College was mooted. A single on-road cycle lane was proposed for the opposite side of the road.

Gerri BIRD
(Labour Party)

Safety is a huge issue, and the hybrid cycle lanes look as though they provide a much safer cycling experience. The practical downside is that they clearly require more space than is available on many of our roads. I would welcome a similar approach where it is physically possible.

Ben BRADNACK
(Labour Party)

Excellent where there is road space, which is usually at a premium on Cambridge city roads, but it would clearly be particularly appropriate in new developments

Robert Paul DRYDEN
(Labour Party)

I have already mentioned Cherry Hinton High St, so lets start off there.

Len FREEMAN
(Labour Party)

I completely support this, but in my ward, Romsey, the streets are very narrow and it's hard to see how this could work here. But certainly in new developments, or in areas with wide roads, it does seem worthwhile.

William Lawrance REDFERN
(Labour Party)

Excellent where there is road space, which is usually at a premium on Cambridge city roads, but would clearly be particularly appropriate in new developments

Tariq SADIQ
(Labour Party)

Yes, fine in principle but we have such narrow roads in Cambridge that it is difficult to see how this could be done without severely constraining space for other users even further.

Mike SARGEANT
(Labour Party)

Excellent where there is road space, which is usually at a premium on Cambridge city roads, but would clearly be particularly appropriate in new developments

Salah AL BANDER
(Liberal Democrat)

It is difficult to see where this facility could be implemented on Cambridge's narrow streets! I would like to know of any specific areas that the Cambridge Cycling Campaign had in mind.

Tim BICK
(Liberal Democrat)

This seems a good idea that should be explored. I would welcome the Campaign's view of places where this would be feasible.

Valerie HOLT
(Liberal Democrat)

My response to this is the same as above. If these are introduced they need to be publicised and explained so that they are properly used and understood by motorists to be lanes with priorities otherwise they are dangerous to cyclists rather than helpful. We have very few roads that are wide enough for them to be introduced in Cambridge City but there are many places where they would be useful ...eg beyond the Castle Hill traffic lights or 30 mile limit on the Huntingdon Road.(Cambridge Lodge Hotel/Storey's Way turn.)

Rhodri Mark JAMES
(Liberal Democrat)

Nowhere springs to mind. Gilbert Road is wide enough, but I sincerely doubt that the residents would accept such a scheme (see below). However, question 4 suggests an answer; this isn't an idea I would want (or I suspect that county would agree) to trial in more than one area, and if hybrid lanes are a solution for King's Hedges Road then using that as the trial would seem reasonable.

Vanessa Ann KELLY
(Liberal Democrat)

The B1049, New Rd and Park Lane would all be good places to start. Having lived in Holland for 2 years, I think hybrid lanes are a good solution for commuter cyclists as they facilitate direct journeys in a way that off-road cycle paths don't and are especially useful where space is restricted.

Jennifer Susan LIDDLE
(Liberal Democrat)

I think it's a very good idea in principle, but I confess I'm struggling to think of any road in East Chesterton that would be suitable for a trial. Most of the roads in Cambridge are too narrow.

Neil Michael MCGOVERN
(Liberal Democrat)

The proposal for hybrid cycle lanes is certainly an interesting one. I've spoken to Julian Huppert, the chairman of Cambridge Traffic Management Area Joint Committee about this issue, and it's something we should certainly investigate together.

Ian NIMMO-SMITH
(Liberal Democrat)

Looks interesting and well worth evaluating. Possible candidates that I would support investigating: Milton Road (as suggested); Chesterton Road; Elizabeth Way; Gilbert Road.

Elizabeth PARKIN
(Liberal Democrat)

This sounds very interesting. There is a new Joint Transport Forum bringing together the County COuncil, South Cambs District Council and the City. This could be a good proposal to take to that forum and I know some of my Lib Dem colleagues are keen to do this.

Sian REID
(Liberal Democrat)

I think the provision on hybrid cycle lanes is a good idea . Possibly in
my ward this would be a good idea for Adams Road? We would welcome the
Campaign's view on possible roads in Newnham. We would like to put the idea for strategic consideration at the Joint Transport Forum, newly established between the three
Local Authorities County SCambs and City to review transport planning, along
with other proposals.

Amanda Joan TAYLOR
(Liberal Democrat)

I support hybrid cycle lanes and better provision is needed, eg on the Hills Rd bridge just outside my ward, and on Queen Edith's Way.

David John WILLINGHAM
(Liberal Democrat)

The concept is great, but whether our current roads are wide enough to implement it is a more difficult question. Although not in Cherry Hinton ward, part of the A1134, formed by Mowbray Road, Perne Road & Brooks Road may have potential for the trial of this type of segregation. Perhaps a trial could also be run on current mandatory cycle lanes that are wide enough by enhancing the solid white line with rumble blocks similar to those found on motorway hard shoulder lines.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.