Consultation guide: Local Transport and Connectivity Plan

Local Transport & Connectivity Plan coverName of consultation: Local Transport and Connectivity Plan

From:
Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority

Format:
Online survey OR email comments to contact@yourltcp.co.uk

Deadline:
Thursday 4 August, 11.59pm

Summary of Camcycle’s view:

The draft plan is muddled, inconsistent and lacks specific timelines and targets. The document must be written to be clear and inspiring to everyone, with climate change at its heart and a clear roadmap to a net zero transport future.

The plan must be structured in line with the hierarchy of road users, detailing active travel projects first, then public transport, then motor vehicle schemes. We reiterate our call for the CPCA to pledge 20% of the transport budget to walking and cycling. There must be a unified approach across each district and the strategy must include demand management policies and the creation of active communities: for example, through low-traffic neighbourhoods.

Read Camcycle’s full consultation response here.

Respond via email (2 minutes)

Click here to open up an email to contact@yourltcp.co.uk and then copy and paste the text below, editing where needed to reflect your personal views.

Dear Sir or Madam,

I support Camcycle’s response to the Local Transport and Connectivity Plan. I believe that addressing climate change and increasing levels of active travel should be core objectives in the next LTCP and that the plan should include a clear roadmap to net zero.

The proposal to reduce car miles driven on the region’s roads by (at least) 15% by 2030 based on 2019 levels should be a clearly defined target of this plan, along with the other recommendations on transport made by the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Commission on Climate. For example, safe cycling routes should be provided for all new developments; further use of e-bikes should be enabled; all home deliveries should be made by zero emission vehicles, including cargo bikes, by 2030; and all buses and taxis operated within the CPCA area should be zero emission by 2030.

In addition, the Local Transport and Connectivity Plan should:

  • Meet national requirements and upcoming guidance with clear policies and quantifiable carbon reduction targets
  • Put journey reduction and active travel at the top of the hierarchy, before the transition to electrify and improve vehicular transport
  • Allocate 20% of the Combined Authority’s transport budget to walking and cycling and embed the user hierarchy throughout the plan.
  • Integrate consideration of land use and place making, together with improvements to transport and digital connectivity.
  • Integrate with a detailed Bus Service Improvement Plan (BSIP) and Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP)
  • Present a unified strategy approach to all districts in the region including details of how car mileage will be reduced and what the balance of mileage reduction will be for each district and between cities, market towns and rural areas and/or types and distance of journey.
  • Include specific goals, measures of success and trigger points for a review of the overall strategy or individual schemes
  • Build on our region’s reputation for innovation, developing ambitious proposals that will secure maximum funding and helping the CPCA become one of the UK’s centres for excellence in transport
  • Be inspiring and accessible to everyone in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

Kind regards,

Your name
Location or postcode

 

Respond via the online survey (around 15 minutes)

Click here to go direct to the consultation survey and then use the guidelines below to help you shape your response.

1) Do you understand why we are making a new Local Transport and Connectivity Plan?

We suggest you answer YES

2) To what extent do you agree with the proposed LTCP vision?

We suggest you answer NOT SURE

3) To what extent do you agree with the proposed LTCP goals?

Suggested answers:

  • Productivity – NOT SURE
  • Connectivity – AGREE
  • Climate – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Environment – AGREE
  • Heath – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Safety – AGREE

4) To what extent do you agree with the proposed LTCP objectives?

Suggested answers:

  • Housing – NOT SURE
  • Employment – AGREE
  • Business & tourism – AGREE
  • Resilience – AGREE
  • Accessibility – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Digital – AGREE
  • Health and wellbeing – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Air quality – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Safety – STRONGLY AGREE
  • Environment – AGREE
  • Climate change – STRONGLY AGREE

5) Please add any further comments you have about the LTCP vision, goals and objectives.

Suggested text:

There are many good elements to the vision, goals and objectives but they are very broad with a lack of focus on the things that are most important. Climate change and addressing carbon reduction should be the overarching goal, with a clear statement that reducing traffic and making active and sustainable transport the preferred option is of the highest priority.

The second sentence of the fourth paragraph of the vision should be rewritten to be clearer on the hierarchy of actions needed to achieve a reduction of private car use and a sustainable future:

“An integrated system of frequent clean public transport, together with walking and cycling infrastructure, demand management of private cars, and the creation of more active neighbourhoods where the movement of people is prioritised over through traffic, will create healthier lives and a greener region.”

 

6) To what extent do you agree with the proposed strategy for transport in Cambridgeshire & Peterborough?

We suggest you answer AGREE

6a) Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

The strategies summarised in the web pages and consultation brochure are more succinct than those in the Draft LTCP. Admirable goals such as “a more joined-up transport network that links cycling and walking routes and different types of public transport” need to be more clearly defined for each district of the region in the longer document and the whole thing needs to be rewritten in line with the user hierarchy: walking and cycling must be prioritised first.

Quantifiable carbon reduction targets must be used to prioritise schemes which have the greatest impact. Proposed measures must be assessed for whole life carbon impact, including the embedded carbon from construction and maintenance materials and the carbon emitted by vehicle use of transport infrastructure.

Travel demand management (of which there is a wide range of options) must form part of the strategy in combination with improvements to active and public transport; it is unlikely goals on climate and health will be met without it.

7) To what extent do you agree with the proposal to cut the number of miles driven on our roads by 15%?

We suggest you answer STRONGLY AGREE

7a) Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

The Combined Authority Board has already agreed to proceed with the recommendation to reduce driven car miles by 15% by 2030; a detailed timeline of measures and implementation for each district is now overdue.

It is likely that this target, even if achieved, is under-ambitious given the scale of the climate challenge and the growing population in our region. Urban areas in particular will need much higher levels of car use reduction to balance out rural areas where reducing journeys is likely to be more difficult. Therefore, there will be a need for many low-cost transport trials that can be delivered at speed with high-quality community engagement and regular reviews of progress towards carbon reduction targets. Significant behaviour change will be needed in the years before 2030; there is not time to await the results of expensive infrastructure projects or technological developments before encouraging all local residents and organisations to take action.

 

8) To what extent do you agree with the proposed transport strategy for East Cambridgeshire?

We suggest you answer DISAGREE

8a) Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

The strategy for East Cambridgeshire includes a mention of the GCP’s Eastern Access proposals as a tool to ensure that “we meet the stated ambition of a 15% reduction in car mileage”; however there is no clear plan for how much reduction in car mileage should be met by this district, how it will be balanced between different types and lengths of journeys and what precise tactics will be used to achieve this goal. The only active travel schemes marked on the map are the Ely to Soham cycle route and the Bottisham Greenway.

The web pages and consultation brochure state that “the aim is to make cycling and walking the first choice for many for shorter journeys or as part of a longer journey.” This is a welcome goal, but again needs detailed metrics and plans set against it, matched to quantifiable carbon reduction goals. It is likely that some aspects of travel demand management will be required in areas of the district, including the development of low-traffic neighbourhoods, healthy streets and 20-minute communities which will bring additional benefits in terms of public health and wellbeing, a reduction in inequality and improved places to live, work and visit.

 

8b) To what extent do you agree with the proposed transport strategy for Fenland?

We suggest you answer DISAGREE

Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

The draft plan says that “improving accessibility to and within Fenland by all modes and for all people is central to our overarching strategy”. However the strategy and approach must follow the user hierarchy and prioritise walking and cycling first, followed by public transport. This is particularly important as 20% of Fenland residents do not have access to a car and transport poverty and isolation are of particular concern in this region.

Fenland District Council’s Walking, Cycling and Mobility Aid Strategy has many positive aspects (for example, the policy to Develop walking and cycling exemplar infrastructure within our Market Towns, resolve safety gaps in villages and enhance core route links across Fenland) but it needs to be more ambitious in its proposed measures, e.g. more Copenhagen-style, pedestrian-priority junctions as well as extra flush kerbs and more active travel priority streets achieved through modal filters as well as improvements to shared-use facilities. Embedding the development of low-traffic neighbourhoods, healthy streets and 20-minute communities will bring additional benefits in terms of public health and wellbeing, a reduction in inequality and improved places to live, work and visit.

It is worrying that many of the junction improvements mentioned focus on the benefits for motor vehicle users such as ‘capacity improvement’, reducing congestion and journey times. Research has consistently shown that road widening leads to increased car use and dependency. All junction improvements should be assessed in the light of the region’s carbon reduction targets and should include safe provision for active travel links.

 

8c) To what extent do you agree with the proposed transport strategy for Greater Cambridge?

We suggest you answer AGREE

Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

Only for Greater Cambridge is climate mentioned as a key transport challenge, but it is a challenge for the whole region. The main contributors to transport emissions within the Combined Authority are Huntingdonshire and South Cambridgeshire. Cambridge city has the lowest transport emissions. Although Greater Cambridge (Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire) is sometimes described as the ‘travel to work area’ for Cambridge, people travel from many other districts in the region to work in the city.

The strategy and approach set out for Greater Cambridge is focused on large-scale, long-timescale projects such as the Greenways and new public transport and active travel corridors to be delivered by the Greater Cambridge Partnership. There is a pressing need to deliver faster results with a suite of experimental schemes such as an expanded programme of School Streets and low-traffic neighbourhoods. The revised Road Classification together with the Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan should be used to identify the routes where most impact could be achieved. The aim should be a rapid reallocation of roadspace to active travel and public transport: much of this could be done at low cost. Increases in walking and cycling were already seen from the Covid-19 modal filter schemes which have now been made permanent and the Mill Road bus gate (which is moving to a public TRO consultation for a renewed filter scheme).

Links are also needed between the Greenways and should be planned in now. For example, there is currently no safe route from the Wilbrahams into Cambridge, nor connections planned from them to the Fulbourn or Bottisham Greenways.

Quantifiable carbon targets and a timed carbon pathway will illustrate the scale of change that is needed in the next eight years. For example, the Greenways are not expected to be completed until 2025. When Carbon Neutral Cambridge analysed the proposals laid out in the previous Local Transport Plan in 2019, they concluded that radical action to cut car use and free up roadspace for sustainable transport before 2030 would require :

  • Car-free metropolitan areas by 2025
  • No new road building or expansions
  • No new Park & Ride facilities and phaseout of existing Park & Ride
  • Rapid phase-out of city centre car parks
  • Workplace levy
  • Removal of all on-street parking.

This suggests that urgency will be required on the ‘City Access’ elements of the Greater Cambridge Partnership programme in order to reach the required carbon targets.

 

8d) To what extent do you agree with the proposed transport strategy for Huntingdonshire?

We suggest you answer DISAGREE

Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

Since the publication of the previous transport plan, all walking and cycling improvements marked in green have been removed from the district map. The failure to follow the user hierarchy is clear from the approach laid out in the consultation brochure and on the website: cycling and walking commitments are vague (‘more paths and lanes’), and are listed beneath ‘enhancements to the road network’.

The strategy for Huntingdonshire needs to go much further than just providing active and sustainable options ‘alongside highways improvements’ (page 86). It must provide more detail on the ‘new, high-quality active travel infrastructure’ that is planned and match these to quantifiable carbon reduction goals. Active travel schemes must be prioritised in the strategy as cost-effective ways to make an immediate impact on carbon reduction; these should not just include capital schemes, but also behaviour change programmes and support for the enhanced uptake of e-bikes.

It is likely that some aspects of travel demand management will be required in areas of the district, including the development of low-traffic neighbourhoods, healthy streets and 20-minute communities. These will bring additional benefits in terms of public health and wellbeing, a reduction in inequality and improved places to live, work and visit.

 

8e) To what extent do you agree with the proposed transport strategy for Peterborough?

We suggest you answer NOT SURE

Please write any other comments you may have

Suggested text:

It is good to see walking and cycling at the top of the list in the ‘Our approach’ section of the consultation brochure and website. There is a recognition that existing vehicle-priority design creates barriers to active travel and safety issues for people travelling on foot and by cycle.

However, ‘Improvements to Peterborough’s road network to reduce congestion, support growth and free up space for cycling and walking’ contains several aspirations, some of which may be in conflict with each other. If reducing congestion means a design focused on vehicular traffic flow, it is likely to result in an adverse outcome for active travel. There are also a large number of road building schemes listed in the draft plan which, as the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Commission on Climate has pointed out, will lead to more car journeys and congestion.

Peterborough City Council has declared a climate emergency and the city’s goal is to be a net-zero carbon city by 2030. All transport projects should include an assessment of whole-life carbon emissions, and realistic pathways should be developed so that Peterborough can play its part in helping the region reduce car mileage by 15% by 2030. Several schemes are laid out in the ‘Active Travel’ section, but the aim to ‘upgrade the cycle network to Dutch standards’ needs detail and the twenty-year strategy to reshape the city centre and reallocate road space will need to be accelerated in light of climate targets. Experimental measures should be used to help assess the schemes and routes that will have the most impact.

It is likely that some aspects of travel demand management will be required in areas of the district, including the development of low-traffic neighbourhoods, healthy streets and 20-minute communities. These will bring additional benefits in terms of public health and wellbeing, a reduction in inequality and improved places to live, work and visit.

 

9) Do you have any other comments about any part of the draft LTCP? Or do you have anything further to say about transport in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough in general?

Suggested text:

I believe that addressing climate change and increasing levels of active travel should be core objectives in the next LTCP and that the plan should include a clear roadmap to net zero.

The proposal to reduce car miles driven on the region’s roads by (at least) 15% by 2030 based on 2019 levels should be a clearly defined target of this plan, along with the other recommendations on transport made by the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Commission on Climate. For example, safe cycling routes should be provided for all new developments; further use of e-bikes should be enabled; all home deliveries should be made by zero emission vehicles, including cargo bikes, by 2030; and all buses and taxis operated within the CPCA area should be zero emission by 2030.

In addition, the Local Transport and Connectivity Plan should:

  • Meet national requirements and upcoming guidance with clear policies and quantifiable carbon reduction targets
  • Put journey reduction and active travel at the top of the hierarchy, before the transition to electrify and improve vehicular transport
  • Allocate 20% of the Combined Authority’s transport budget to walking and cycling and embed the user hierarchy throughout the plan.
  • Integrate consideration of land use and place making, together with improvements to transport and digital connectivity.
  • Integrate with a detailed Bus Service Improvement Plan (BSIP) and Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP)
  • Present a unified strategy approach to all districts in the region including details of how car mileage will be reduced and what the balance of mileage reduction will be for each district and between cities, market towns and rural areas and/or types and distance of journey.
  • Include specific goals, measures of success and trigger points for a review of the overall strategy or individual schemes
  • Build on our region’s reputation for innovation, developing ambitious proposals that will secure maximum funding and helping the CPCA become one of the UK’s centres for excellence in transport
  • Be inspiring and accessible to everyone in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.