Cycling shorts

Anglia Railways has been named ‘Best Train Operator’ in this year’s CycleMark awards, which recognise success in integrating bike and trail travel. Anglia’s fifth CycleMark award particularly recognised the company’s new web site for cyclists (www.anglia-railways.com/cycle ), its installation of 578 extra cycle parking spaces across its 47 stations, and its ongoing promotion of cycle/rail facilities. Details of the other winners are on the Strategic Rail Authority web site: www.sra.gov.uk .

Next year’s Bike Week will run from 14 to 22 June in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The Bike2Work promotion will again run for the whole week (optionally raising funds for Cancer Research UK). For more information, follow www.bikeweek.org.uk or contact Nick Harvey, Bike Week Co-ordinator e-mail nick@bikeweek.org.uk phone (01243) 543888.

Image as described adjacent
Cow Lane, Fulbourn.

The junction of Cow Lane, Pierce Lane and Hinton Road in Fulbourn has been hastily rebuilt to avoid an oblique Give Way. It includes a cycle bypass around a new island, but a rather ill-lit and narrow one.

After the storms in October, some cycle routes blocked by debris were not cleared for a while. This is because no-one reported the obstructions to Cambridgeshire County Council. The council cannot afford to inspect the roads and cycle paths; they rely on road and path users (us) to report problems such as pot-holes, failed lights or fallen trees. To report specific potholes, poor surfaces or overgrown foliage, within Cambridge, Fulbourn and Histon, phone Terry Radford at the City Council (01223) 458260, use the County Council’s reporting form on the Web, or print out (or request) and send our Pothole Postcard. For failed lights note the street and lamp number and try phone 0800 253529 e-mail Street.Lighting@transportation.camcnty.gov.uk.

The Advertising Standards Authority has upheld a complaint by Cambridge Cycling Campaign about an advertisement for a GPS device to warn drivers of speed cameras. The ASA considered the claim that ‘Road Angel has been specifically designed to rapidly provide you with the critical information to enhance the safety of your journey’ exaggerated the benefit of using the device. The ASA Code’s Motoring section says: Advertisers should not portray speed in a way that might encourage motorists to drive irresponsibly or break the law (48.3). Safety Claims should not exaggerate the benefit to consumers. Advertisers should not make absolute claims about safety unless they hold evidence to support them (48.8). See www.asa.org.uk .