Elections

Cambridge City Council elections, May 2021: Queen Edith's

Summary: Cambridge City Council elections, May 2021
Polling date: Thursday 6th May 2021
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Christine Anna BUTLER  (Conservative Party)
  • Sam DAVIES  (Independent)
  • Al DIXON  (Independent)
  • Richard ECCLES  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Daniel LEE  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Connor MORRISSEY  (Labour Party)
  • Jennifer PAGE-CROFT  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Peter PRICE  (Green Party)
  • Shoaib SHAHID  (Conservative Party)
  • Suhaib SHAHID  (Conservative Party)
  • Indira VADHIA  (Labour Party)
  • Jacqui WHITMORE  (Green Party)
  • Simon WHITMORE  (Green Party)
  • Daniel ZAHEDI  (Labour Party)

Questions for Queen Edith's ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

How would you improve safety and attractiveness of cycling for people of all ages and abilities on Queen Edith's Way?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

My article in the Spring 2021 Camcycle magazine highlighted how important I think it is to (a) base any changes to our neighbourhood on sound evidence and (b) ensure residents’ priorities are incorporated (what I described as a ‘roots’ as well as ‘routes’ approach). Here’s how I think that applies in the case of QEW.

We need to better understand the ‘demand’ side – what evidence do we actually have about use of that route (origin, destination, frequency) and how it fits into the wider local network? Previous proposals from the County Council were not very strong on evidence or consistency. They asserted that their pre-defined solution was the only possibility, even though the 2014 proposals framed the need in terms of a commuting route for people heading to the Biomedical Campus and to the Arm site in Cherry Hinton, while later framings emphasised ‘Safer routes to schools’. Progress stalled because of criticism from residents, pointing to unacceptable safety compromises for both cyclists and pedestrians, and because of the impacts on trees and verges. Having looked again Camcycle’s own response to the August 2016 consultation, I note that it too made many of the same points.

So when QEW comes back onto the County Council’s agenda, it is imperative that we start with a clean slate and that residents and cyclists (partially overlapping but not identical groups) are given equal opportunity to embed their priorities. We need to acknowledge that a cyclist commuting along QEW from Fulbourn to the Biomedical Campus will have different concerns to a family living on Beaumont Road cycling their children to Queen Edith’s Primary which will be different again to those of an elderly resident walking to the GP practice. All of them deserve safe and attractive routes.

It’s also important that we are clear from the start about the supply side – what timeframe is being planned for, what budget is available, how holistic a solution can we achieve? Basically, are we discussing a quick fix, or something which will futureproof our neighbourhood? I hope we as a community can develop proposals which are resilient against all the changes that can realistically be foreseen over the next couple of decades, particularly impacts of climate change such as urban heat island effects and extremes of rainfall and drought. We must learn from the corners cut on, for example the Hills Road cycleways, where SUDS and tree-planting should have been integral parts of the scheme from the outset.

For all of these reasons, I would argue that we cannot look at QEW as a standalone linear route tackled by a discrete intervention of cycle infrastructure. It needs to be treated in context, reflecting where people actually want to go. And it is as much a challenge of imagination and communication as it is of engineering. Can we nurture our local centre at Wulfstan Way as the focus of a liveable neighbourhood? Can we re-shape Queen Edith’s residential streets as woonerf rather than rat-runs? Can we reduce the amount of road space taken up by car parking through deployment of residents parking zones, car club spaces, micro-mobility options? We already know that there’s a desire within the neighbourhood for better speed and parking enforcement; more crossing points to get people across QEW; active-travel-friendly interconnecting routes north and south of QEW; and better public transport. It is only by developing an integrated vision which incorporates all of these changes that we can achieve the level of modal shift required to make cycling on QEW truly safe and attractive to everyone. To be honest, I’m not sure the County Council is up to the job; but I would do my damnedest as QE City Councillor to help bring it about.

Al DIXON
(Independent)

I would like to improve safety of all cyclist across the Ward and not just focusing on Queen Ediths Way. Although the main routes do need to be safe for cyclist there are many other journeys that cyclist will be taking that also do not feel safe. Rather than think just in terms of a series of routes that are for cyclists I would like to investigate the possibility of creating cycle (and pedestrian) safe zones. Driving at high speed in residential areas makes cycling feel less safe for many people. We need to change this. I would like to see Cambridge become a truly cycle safe city.

Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

There is not a quick adn easy answer to this. I know from canvassing that some residents of Queen Edith's Way are concerned about the speed of cars on their road, so appropriate speed limit enforcement may be appropriate. As a general principle, more and safer cycling is an important health and environmental objective, and as a cyclist myself I generally favour initiatives to encourage cycling.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

Queen Edith’s Way is tricky one. It’s quite a narrow road in some points doesn't have the biggest verges, which doesn’t leave enough room for easily segregated cycle paths. In an ideal world, with the required funding, we'd be able to create segregated cycle lanes as per Figure 1 in the consultation, where width permits. This would clearly mean reducing verges, and along some stretches there simply is not room to have a planted separator between the road and cycle path, such as the stretch of QEW from Greystoke Road to the Robin Hood junction. But where possible this would be the ideal format, empowering cyclists of all abilities by separating them from road users, separating cyclists from pedestrians to ensure their safety, maintaining the trees that residents love, and allowing traffic to flow.

There are complications of course, not just losing part of the verges! There has also been local opposition in the past to changes to make it more cycle accessible. We would have to consider whether the floating bus stops are suitable for Queen Edith's Way given the space they take up. Another issue is how to ensure that drivers do no park temporarily on the cycle lanes, blocking them, as they are wont to do on Hills Road. Speeding can still be an issue but the recently installed speed cameras (a Lib Dem initative) should help. But these are issues that should be addressed as part of the process, and a separated cycle path would seem to be a reasonable starting place - the key thing here is that any solution needs to be collaborative and we need to engage with the all members of the community to find a solution which will work for all.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

Cycle lanes, road maintenance, enforcing speed limits, pedestrian crossings. I think infrastructure decisions like the Dutch-roundabout on Fendon Road is a step in the right direction. I'm fully behind our Labour candidate for Police and Crime Commissioner Nicky Massey who is working on enforcing 20mph limits with the police and is a supporter of the 20's Plenty campaign.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

Queen Edith’s way is a major through route for cars and cyclists, although it is not well designed to benefit cyclists despite there being major employers (Addenbrooke’s and the biomedical campus, and ARM) close to each end of the road. The lack of a dedicated cycle path is a particular problem and safety concern for cyclists. If elected, I will campaign for a fully interconnected, properly segregated cycle route on all major roads in Queen Edith’s ward including Queen Edith’s way so that people of all abilities and ages who want to feel safe to make cycling part of their local transportation.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

I agree that traffic policing should be a greater priority. Working preventatively, police must receive enough funding to be able to put more resources into public campaigns. These campaigns should be around topics such as speed limits and minimum safe passing distances. They should be evidence-based and positive so to not alienate any one category of road user.

Motorists not abiding by 20pmh speed limits is a city-wide concern and one that greatly impacts on the number of people wanting to cycle in the city. Police must be prepared to take action and prosecute motorists where necessary.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Queen Ediths way is a major through route for cars and cyclists, although it is not well designed to benefit cyclists despite major employers (Addenbrooke’s and the biomedical campus, and ARM) close to each end of the road. The lack of a dedicated cycle path is a particular problem and safety concern for cyclists. If elected, I will campaign for a fully interconnected, properly segregated cycle route on all major roads in Queen Ediths ward including Queen Ediths way so that people of all abilities and ages who want to feel safe to make cycling part of their local transportation.

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Queen Ediths way is a major through route for cars and cyclists, although it is not well designed to benefit cyclists despite major employers (Addenbrooke’s and the biomedical campus, and ARM) close to each end of the road. The lack of a dedicated cycle path is a particular problem and safety concern for cyclists. If elected, I will campaign for a fully interconnected, properly segregated cycle route on all major roads in Queen Ediths ward including Queen Ediths way so that people of all abilities and ages who want to feel safe to make cycling part of their local transportation.

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

I agree that traffic policing should be a greater priority. Working preventatively, police must receive enough funding to be able to put more resources into public campaigns. These campaigns should be around topics such as speed limits and minimum safe passing distances. They should be evidence-based and positive so to not alienate any one category of road user.

Motorists not abiding by 20pmh speed limits is a city-wide concern and one that greatly impacts on the number of people wanting to cycle in the city. Police must be prepared to take action and prosecute motorists where necessary.

# Question 2

How will you ensure that the Netherhall Farm development gets the active travel links it needs?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

I’ve been at the forefront of efforts to try to make this a reality, most recently speaking at March’s Planning Committee on the subject, alongside a Camcycle speaker. As I said in my most recent video on the subject, I don’t know whether it was lack of councillors’ local knowledge or just not pressing the arguments hard enough which contributed to the approval of Outline Planning Permission for GB1/2 without adequate active travel links but it’s little short of disastrous for both the existing neighbourhood and all the residents who will move onto those developments.

There’s been a total lack of transparency about what steps the developer, CEG, has taken to try to achieve such access. We know that four houses in suitable locations on Beaumont Road have been sold on the open market in the last few years – it would have been possible for CEG to have purchased any of those plots to create a through route. There’s also the currently vacant plot next to 31 Beaumont Road. Given the financial return which the developers will make, the sum necessary to secure either of these routes would be insignificant. I will continue to ask Exec Cllr for Planning, Katie Thornburrow, to follow up on CEG’s (in)activity and to provide a public explanation of what further pressure can be brought to bear. Those links need to be provided.

Al DIXON
(Independent)

I will support cycling and walking across Queen Ediths and connecting with the other wards of the city. I support much of the work you have done to make sure that cycling is a core requirement in all developments. My experience is that Cambridge has patchy series of schemes rather than a culture of being being cycling city that also needs to make room for vehicles rather than the other way round. Only when people feel the can cycle across the ward and city without significant risk can we claim to be a cycling friendly city. My experience of living in Amsterdam for five years gives me first hand perspective on a truly cycle friendly culture.

Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

My preliminary views are that I would support integrating active travel (walking and cycling) into the site and that any cycleways should be of adequate width to encourage a good number of residents to cycle. However, as a first-time candidate who has not yet served on the Council, I cannot make any definite comment at this stage and would want to be fully briefed before doing so. Planning rules prevent me from stating here which way I would vote if I were elected and if I were then on the committee.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the Cycling Campaign's assessment of the site, with the missing link being vital to ensure active travel is designed into the site, and residents are not dependent on cars. I would work with residents and other councillors to explore and ensure proper links to the rest of the city.

I can't say here which way I would vote were I on the committee because of planning rules, but I have some misgivings about the plans in their current form.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

GB1 and GB2 development plans include pledges to prioritise cyclists and pedestrians needs. Plans connecting the sites to Babraham Park and Ride through a shared cyclist/pedestrian pathway must be kept. There are also bus stops nearby on Hills Road and Addenbrookes.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

Identifying the permissive bridleway as the major route for active transport to be linked to the Netherhall Farm development is not enough - this development needs to have links to Beaumont Road and Queen Ediths - without this this development is simply being built for car use. I will actively campaign on this if elected to ensure that this development is truly made for residents to walk and cycle to take their local journeys.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

The plans for GB1 and GB2 include pledges to prioritise cyclists and pedestrians throughout. The sites are also located nearby to bus stops on Hills Road and also Addenbrooke’s, encouraging the use of public transport. Plans to directly connect the sites to Babraham Park and Ride through a shared cyclist/pedestrian pathway must be kept.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Identifying the permissive bridleway as the major route for active transport to be linked to the Netherhall Farm development is not enough - this development needs to have links to Beaumont Road and Queen Ediths - without this this development is simply being built for car use. I will actively campaign on this if elected to ensure that this development is truly made for residents to walk and cycle to take their local journeys.

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Identifying the permissive bridleway as the major route for active transport to be linked to the Netherhall Farm development is not enough - this development needs to have links to Beaumont Road and Queen Ediths - without this this development is simply being built for car use. I will actively campaign on this if elected to ensure that this development is truly made for residents to walk and cycle to take their local journeys.

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

The plans for GB1 and GB2 include pledges to prioritise cyclists and pedestrians throughout. The sites are also located nearby to bus stops on Hills Road and also Addenbrooke’s, encouraging the use of public transport. Plans to directly connect the sites to Babraham Park and Ride through a shared cyclist/pedestrian pathway must be kept.

# Question 3

What needs to happen to enable a majority of children to walk or cycle to the five schools in Queen Edith’s?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

Queen Edith’s hosts an array of educational institutions, and while they have some issues in common, different approaches may also be needed according to the pupil demographic and the catchment area.

• The easiest to solve should be Netherhall on QEW which has relatively local catchment area. Better neighbourhood routes as described above plus adequate safe cycle parking should suffice for the majority of secondary students
• The picture is slightly more complicated for the local primary schools - Queen Edith, Queen Emma, Morley – because the children are more younger and mostly travel with parents. What conversations are these schools having with parents who currently drive about the reasons for this, and what alternatives might work? Can the schools organise/resource ‘walking bus’ routes for example? What response would there be from parents and residents to the introduction of school streets? Can the police and civil enforcement services resource strong and consistent action against illegal parking? There will be a new head teacher at the two Queens primaries in the autumn after 30 years, I’m sure they will come with their own views.
• The most challenging will be Long Road Sixth Form college and CAST on Long Road and the Perse (Hills Road) all of which draw their students from across the whole region (as does Hills Road Sixth Form College just on the boundary of Queen Edith’s). Collectively these institutions have over 5000 students travelling in each day to our area. But all of them have done travel surveys so they know where their students live, how they currently travel and hence what scope there is for modal shift, either to walking/cycling or to public transport, which of course has taken a big hit during the pandemic. As a ward councillor, I would want to work with those institutions to develop concrete plans which turn their evidence into action for all our benefit.

Al DIXON
(Independent)

Cycling to school should be the norm but at present cars are driven too fast around the roads near the schools. Cyclist need to feel safe. Priority around schools should be given to children on foot an cycling and not to traffic speeding past the school gates as it does presently especially in Wulfstan Way. Safe cycle zones rather than a patchwork of cycle lanes would be my preference.

Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

As a parent myself, I can say that large numbers of children walk to school in my part of Queen Edith's, at least to my son's school. To encourage children who are old enough to cycle to school, the most important factors are likely to be ensuring cycle parking facilities at schools and (where appropriate) improving the safety of roads near schools by enforcing appropriate speed limits. It would be good to see more car-free zones (i.e. car-free at drop-off and pick-up times) at more schools where appropriate, but only where it is demonstrated that there is a material traffic issue.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

Firstly we need to level up all our schools to ensure parents pick based on location and distance from home rather than Ofsted results.

Secondly, we need to work with schools and Bikeability to promote confidence in cycling amongst children, but also parents. Making sure that children know how to cycle safely, and parents having faith in that ability, is an important component of any plan to enable children to walk or cycle to school.

Thirdly we need to ensure safe cycle/walking infrastructure in the areas around schools. From segregated cycle lanes to low traffic areas we need to ensure that each of our schools feels like a safe place to visit. The county has recently introduced car free zones during drop-off and pick-up times run by local residents and parents. I would like to see more of these.

Dangerous parking outside our nursery and primary schools is a constant complaint — we need police to enforce parking restrictions like keep clear markings and clamp down on obstructive parking.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

Good signage, enforcing 20Mph areas, well-designed speed bumps, segregated cycle lanes. Parents need the confidence that their children can safely use our streets. We've heard of speeding outside Queen Edith's Primary School and this needs to be looked into asap.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

There are major changes to the road structure required for this part of town to be a safe place for children to cycle to school. I would campaign for frequent pedestrian crossings at all points where it is shown that people are tempted to cross directly, and for segregated cycle ways with specific and clearly marked areas for bicycles. I would also campaign for road traffic lights to have cycle priority, to further ensure cyclists are safe as they cross junctions which are a focus point for accidents. I would also campaign to ensure that all children in Queen Edith’s are offered cycling proficiency at an early age.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

Fully segregated cycle lanes on all major roads are essential. Parents need to be confident that there is enough space for their children to use the roads, away from flowing traffic and parked cars. Greater signage, such as that on shared cyclist/pedestrian pathways, is also very important to remind both groups to respect one another.

Residents have told us that parking and speeding outside Queen Edith’s Primary School is an issue. This is very concerning and demonstrates that work is not simply needed on the major roads, but on residential ones too. As per Question 1, public campaigns and greater policing is needed on this part of Godwin Way and potentially in other areas of the ward.

Fairer funding for schools is another very important factor. Parents should feel happy to send their children to their nearest school and schools should be equipped with the necessary re-sources to provide for their entire catchment areas. Every child should receive regular bikeability training throughout their education. Such training helps to build road safety awareness and confidence amongst young people, allowing them to positively and respectfully share the road with other users.

The quality of our roads and pavements is also important. We will continue to encourage residents to report potholes in their area to the County Council.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

There are major changes to the road structure required for this part of town to be a safe place for children to cycle to school. I would campaign for frequent pedestrian crossings at all points where it is shown that people are tempted to cross directly, and for segregated cycle ways with specific and clearly marked areas for bicycles. This could include paths with clearly marked cycle lanes near to primary schools, as very young children often start their cycling lives by riding on the path.

I would also campaign for road traffic lights to have cycle priority, to further ensure cyclists are safe as they cross junctions which are a focus point for accidents. I would also campaign to ensure that all children in Queen Ediths are offered cycling proficiency at an early age.

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

There are major changes to the road structure required for this part of town to be a safe place for children to cycle to school. I would campaign for frequent pedestrian crossings at all points where it is shown that people are tempted to cross directly, and for segregated cycle ways with specific and clearly marked areas for bicycles. This could include paths with clearly marked cycle lanes near to primary schools, as very young children often start their cycling lives by riding on the path.

I would also campaign for road traffic lights to have cycle priority, to further ensure cyclists are safe as they cross junctions which are a focus point for accidents. I would also campaign to ensure that all children in Queen Ediths are offered cycling proficiency at an early age.

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

Fully segregated cycle lanes on all major roads are essential. Parents need to be confident that there is enough space for their children to use the roads, away from flowing traffic and parked cars. Greater signage, such as that on shared cyclist/pedestrian pathways, is also very important to remind both groups to respect one another.

Residents have told us that parking and speeding outside Queen Edith’s Primary School is an issue. This is very concerning and demonstrates that work is not simply needed on the major roads, but on residential ones too. As per Question 1, public campaigns and greater policing is needed on this part of Godwin Way and potentially in other areas of the ward.

Fairer funding for schools is another very important factor. Parents should feel happy to send their children to their nearest school and schools should be equipped with the necessary re-sources to provide for their entire catchment areas. Every child should receive regular bikeability training throughout their education. Such training helps to build road safety awareness and confidence amongst young people, allowing them to positively and respectfully share the road with other users.

The quality of our roads and pavements is also important. We will continue to encourage residents to report potholes in their area to the County Council.

# Question 4

What do you propose to improve cycling and walking access to, and through, the Biomedical Campus / Addenbrookes?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

The 2019 Transport Needs Review published by the Campus identified 43 quick wins to reduce car dependency. Two years later only a third have made any progress. I’ve spoken twice at the Greater Cambridge Partnership Executive Board about how governance failures and resourcing constraints act as barriers to progress. Even the most basic attempt to improve wayfinding signage onto and around the Campus seems to have ground to a halt.

All this is intensely frustrating to residents bearing the brunt of the impact of the Campus’s growth and I feel very strongly that the Campus should get its own house in order by expediting really obvious measures like the installation of safe covered cycle parking in convenient locations and the installation of pedestrian crossings in key locations, eg at the junction of Robinson Way and Keith Day Road. They also need to stop scoring own goals like the chicane on the descent from the Guided Busway bridge, thankfully removed after pressure from Camcycle.

Outside the Campus, I can point to recent improvements such as the Babraham Road crossing which now enables safe access via Ninewells; the removal of parking on Red Cross Lane; and the deployment of the Vio bikes and scooters which seem to be well-used. However, I still don’t think we’re anywhere near having an integrated movement plan. I’m waiting on the next set of plans for the Linton Greenway, which seems very space constrained on the final Babraham Rd/Hills Rd stretch to Addenbrooke’s roundabout. I’m also trepidatious about the impact on the DNA path of the CSET busway and the four-tracking of the railway required for Cambridge South station.

We also need much greater attention to detail and better finishing off of projects. Several of the crossings put in as part of the Hills Road cycleways scheme and the Addenbrooke’s roundabout signals revision (both 2017) still flood to the point of being impassable. Motorised wheelchair users can’t access the call button on the Addenbrooke’s roundabout islands. Parking has been removed from Red Cross Lane but the lighting levels will need improving before it feels like a safe route to/from the Campus during winter months.

The Campus is already slated to be the biggest employment site in the region – 30k jobs by the late 2020s. The 2019 Transport Needs Review stated that – even with Cambridge South station and the CSET route operating at or beyond the maximum credible capacity – it will be a struggle for the local road network not to grind to a halt by 2030. Yet the Campus is now starting another ‘conversation’ about how it can continue to “grow sensibly”, even while we play catch up with dealing with the growth that has already happened. The overwhelming scale of the Campus’s ambition means that, we need to not only design walking and cycling routes which are attractive in their own right, but also ensure their interaction with mass transit solutions and micromobility options.

Al DIXON
(Independent)

At the moment access to the site is designed around vehicular traffic, this is also the case within the site. Where there are cycle paths they criss cross pavements and end suddenly directing cyclist into the path of on coming traffic. Painting a give way lines doesn't cut it. The paths need to be continuous and enable cyclist a pedestrians to both feel safe. None of the new development comes up to standard of being cycle and pedestrian friendly. Cycles, pedestrians and vehicles can coexist when cycling is considered central to our city transport . This is currently not the case in within or surrounding the biomedical campus but as I have already indicated we have too many limited cycle lanes or junctions rather than being a cycling city.

Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

If elected I would look favourably on creating or revising cycle lane layouts where they are clearly needed and possible, and on parking restrictions where necessary to stop problematic parking. However, I am a first-time candidate who has not yet served on the Council, so I cannot really comment at this stage; I would want to be informed of all relevant issues first.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

Protected segregated facilities are key with kerb segregation are essential. We need to ensure that workers feel empowered and safe to use active transport to access the campus. We also need to encourage companies to consider the facilities workers might need, such as safe bike storage, lockers, and showers etc.

Furthermore we need to look at parking restrictions to ensure obstructive/ nuisance parking is addressed and seek to to reduce the need for car ownership.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

So my experience of the route to Addenbrookes is from the perspective of someone who lives more centrally in Cambridge. The route I take goes down essentially begins at Coldhams Lane, I then take a right at the roundabout at Sainsbury's onto Brooks Road and its straight-line to Addenbrookes. Generally this is a good route with cycle lanes, however my biggest concern is that roundabout at Sainsbury's as I don't think it takes into account cyclists needs. Parked cars on verges also pose a problem. I can also see how for the less confident cyclist that Pern Road and Cherry Hinton roundabout is problematic. My personal experience of cycling within Addenbrookes and the Biomedical Campus is relatively limited, so the issues here is something I would like to look into.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

Cycling to the Cambridge biomedical campus is excellent from some specific locations, but the whole area suffers from cycling infrastructure not being well joined up. There are some excellent projects such as the Fendon Road / Queen Edith’s Way projects, but we need this lens applied to all streets in Cambridge to make them truly built for people and not for cars.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

Fully segregated cycle lanes on Long Road would be helpful, as would cycle lanes and designated cycle routes throughout the site. With Cambridge South train station due to open in 2025, it is imperative that the site is prepared with the necessary cycle pathways to handle the in-creased numbers of people needing to access the area.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Cycling to the Cambridge biomedical campus is excellent from some specific locations, but the whole area suffers from cycling infrastructure not being well joined up. There are some excellent projects such as the Fendon Road/Queen Ediths Way projects, but we need marked cycle lanes within the campus, and this lens applied to all streets in Cambridge to make them truly built for people and not for cars.

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

Cycling to the Cambridge biomedical campus is excellent from some specific locations, but the whole area suffers from cycling infrastructure not being well joined up. There are some excellent projects such as the Fendon Road/Queen Ediths Way projects, but we need marked cycle lanes within the campus, and this lens applied to all streets in Cambridge to make them truly built for people and not for cars.

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

Fully segregated cycle lanes on Long Road would be helpful, as would cycle lanes and designated cycle routes throughout the site. With Cambridge South train station due to open in 2025, it is imperative that the site is prepared with the necessary cycle pathways to handle the in-creased numbers of people needing to access the area.

# Question 5

In your view, how could the next Local Plan and local planning processes be strengthened to enable cycling as a regular mode of transport for those living in new developments and to avoid new developments generating traffic? What are your views on updating the next Local Plan so that it has design specifications and requirements for cycle parking for disabled cyclists as well as cycle parking for cargo cycles, which are increasingly used by families as a car replacement?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

I have three suggestions, based on my direct experience of trying to fix problems after the event:

• Ensure site connectivity – providing appropriate active travel connections with the existing neighbourhood should be non-negotiable, and the next Local Plan needs to remove any wriggle-room for developers to opt out of providing this as they have been able to at GB1/2.
• Install active travel infrastructure first – it is ridiculous that there are still active travel routes in Great Kneighton which have yet to be completed, despite the fact that the first residents moved in nearly a decade ago. If the City Council wants to support walking and cycling, it must recognise that it needs to be attractive and convenient from the start, not the last thing the developer does before it move offsite. This needs to be embedded in the Local Plan.
• Improve design standards - as everyone reading this will be painfully aware, cycle theft is a big problem across the city. I have been helping residents at Ninewells to challenge basic design flaws which have led to repeated thefts from bike storage areas on this new ‘award-winning’ development, in common with the rest of the Southern Fringe sites. Policies to deliver secure cycle parking in appropriate accessible locations, designed for a range of cycle types, have to be a priority.

Al DIXON
(Independent)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

Please see my above responses. I have never yet served on the Council and I would want to be briefed on all relevant issues first. However, my first impressions are that the following measures could where appropriate be stipulated and/or implemented: suitable covered cycle parking provision; and cycle connections to cycle routes. As a general principle, I would be in favour of proportionate provision being made for cargo cycles (for families with children) and for cycle parking for the disabled. The location of developments close to public transport is generally an important consideration.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

We need generous cycle parking provision at each home to be stipulated: easily accessible from the dwelling and easy to ride off from to public routes; parking needs to be secure (given Cambridge's cycle theft risk this is especially important) and covered. This needs to include reasonable options for cycle parking for disabled cyclists and cargo bikes where appropriate.

Developments should include funding for cycle connection to cycle routes beyond them so they are fully integrated to a cycling 'network'. This makes it easier for people to get from A to B without taking circuitous diversions that really just discourage people from cycling.

Car parking ought to be centralised within the development, reducing vehicle permeation of the development.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

All planning needs to be thought through and done conscientiously, particularly with the needs of cyclists taken into account. This would involve integrating the government's LTN 1/20 cycle infrastructure, having cycleways, suitable and accessible cycle parks as well as car parking space for new developments. Although with some faults I would say the cyclepark at the Cambridge train station in general represents a good example and has facilities for bikes of different types.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

The next Local Plan need to completely redefine the priorities for Cambridge as a city. Despite having a wealth of expertise and some very serious investment, we have not faced up to the truth of the climate emergency which requires a rapid transition to a low carbon economy, in a way that does not further disadvantage those who are the least well off. As part of this we need to make a focus on active transport, including cycling and walking, and concentrate on local centres to prevent the need for so many cross-town journeys that contribute so greatly to congestion and air pollution.

Every single development needs to have cycle parking that includes plentiful spaces with full access requirements for disabled cyclists, and cargo cycles, so that more families and individuals in Cambridge can be enabled to choose to use non-car methods of transport. We need specific policies to require this for every development, instead of relying on the hard work of groups like Camcycle to trawl every development and make objections - this needs to be at the forefront of every planning officers mind because it is an essential part of the local plan.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

There should be limited space for private cars on new developments and car parking areas should generally be located away from home within developments. This has been implemented in Eddington.

New developments should have networks of cycleways with cycle priority junctions. Cycleways within developments should be linked to cycle routes connecting to a broader external net-work of cycleways, enabling cyclists to make journeys separated from busy highways. Ample se-cure parking facilities for cycles of different sizes, including cargo bikes, should be provided and located close to people’s homes.

It is imperative sufficient budgets are allocated by the Local Authority to ensure cycle infra-structure is maintained and does not deteriorate over time.

It is also important that the DFT Local Transport Note (LTN 1/20) Guidelines for cycle infrastructure become a standard reference to integrate the principles, best practice and cycle infra-structure design not only into the updated Local Plan but also as a reference to be followed for all cycle infrastructure projects undertaken by the County Council, GCP and the Combined Authority.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

The next Local Plan needs to completely redefine the priorities for Cambridge as a city. Despite having a wealth of expertise and some very serious investment, we have not faced up to the truth of the climate emergency which requires a rapid transition to a low carbon economy, in a way that does not further disadvantage those who are the least well off. As part of this we need to make a focus on active transport, including cycling and walking, and concentrate on local centres to prevent the need for so many cross-town journeys that contribute so greatly to congestion and air pollution.

Every single development needs to have cycle parking that includes plentiful spaces with full access requirements for disabled cyclists, and cargo cycles, so that more families and individuals in Cambridge can be enabled to choose to use non-car methods of transport. Every road in Cambridge needs at least a marked cycle lane, to encourage cycling as a regular mode of transport across Cambridge. We need specific policies to require this for every development, instead of relying on the hard work of groups like Camcycle to trawl every development and make objections - this needs to be at the forefront of every planning officers mind because it is an essential part of the local plan.

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

The next Local Plan need to completely redefine the priorities for Cambridge as a city. Despite having a wealth of expertise and some very serious investment, we have not faced up to the truth of the climate emergency which requires a rapid transition to a low carbon economy, in a way that does not further disadvantage those who are the least well off. As part of this we need to make a focus on active transport, including cycling and walking, and concentrate on local centres to prevent the need for so many cross-town journeys that contribute so greatly to congestion and air pollution.

Every single development needs to have cycle parking that includes plentiful spaces with full access requirements for disabled cyclists, and cargo cycles, so that more families and individuals in Cambridge can be enabled to choose to use non-car methods of transport. We need specific policies to require this for every development, instead of relying on the hard work of groups like Camcycle to trawl every development and make objections - this needs to be at the forefront of every planning officers mind because it is an essential part of the local plan.

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

There should be limited space for private cars on new developments and car parking areas should generally be located away from home within developments. This has been implemented in Eddington.

New developments should have networks of cycleways with cycle priority junctions. Cycleways within developments should be linked to cycle routes connecting to a broader external net-work of cycleways, enabling cyclists to make journeys separated from busy highways. Ample se-cure parking facilities for cycles of different sizes, including cargo bikes, should be provided and located close to people’s homes.

It is imperative sufficient budgets are allocated by the Local Authority to ensure cycle infra-structure is maintained and does not deteriorate over time.

It is also important that the DFT Local Transport Note (LTN 1/20) Guidelines for cycle infrastructure become a standard reference to integrate the principles, best practice and cycle infra-structure design not only into the updated Local Plan but also as a reference to be followed for all cycle infrastructure projects undertaken by the County Council, GCP and the Combined Authority.

# Question 6

What challenges do people face in your area that prevent them from cycling, especially children and those using cycling as a mobility aid? How should cycling and walking infrastructure in your area be improved so that people of all ages and abilities would feel safe cycling there?

Christine Anna BUTLER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Sam DAVIES
(Independent)

I hope readers can see from my previous answers that I am passionate about how we look after the interests of cyclists and pedestrians of all ages and abilities. We need funding not just for the headline-generating capital projects but also regular routine maintenance conducted to a high quality: the state of pavements across Queen Edith’s presents a real challenge to many members of our community. I guess I’d sum it up as saying we urgently require a step change which can only be achieved by joined-up thinking across local government budgets and functional silos, rooted in an inclusive place-based approach which works for our community. And that’s what I’d want to achieve as City Councillor for Queen Edith’s.

Al DIXON
(Independent)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Richard ECCLES
(Liberal Democrat)

Cyclists need to feel safe from cars which means, generally speaking, that appropriate speed restrictions should be imposed and where possible be supported, ideally by electronic tools measuring and stating speed to drivers. Any cycle lanes should be created in my view by the kerb and not between two lanes of traffic as on Hills Road (in my view those lanes feel unsafe for both cyclists and drivers). Where appropriate, in out-of-centre areas, pavements which are wide enough should be expressly permissible for bicycle use as well as for pedestrians.

Daniel LEE
(Liberal Democrat)

Safety is the key, and the feeling of being safe - whether as a cyclist or that your children are safe if they are cycling unsupervised - is equally important.

We need protected, segregated facilities, with kerb segregation being a minimum standard. My greater concern is about people that currently aren’t walking and cycling than those that already feel able to – for those not feeling confident enough it is often having to cross the road, or go on the road with cars that prevents them from walking and cycling more.

Road works should have a higher requirement to not reduce walking or cycling provision for their duration – currently car access is the thing that is preserved in most cases. In others officers slavishly follow the requirement to have bollards near signs, often placing these directly in a cycle lane, which is totally wrong.

Connor MORRISSEY
(Labour Party)

Residents have raised issues of potholes and speeding vehicles. Areas in need of road maintenance and where we need to address speed limits and speed bumps should be identified. I think the Fendon Road roundabout represents an example of infrastructure in the area that prioritises cycling safety, and if we can similarly improve road infrastructure such as putting in place more cyclist-go-first traffic lights and cycling lanes I would hope people will feel more comfortable cycling. Afterall Cambridge is known for its cycling and as a city we should do what we can to felicitate and encourage it.

Jennifer PAGE-CROFT
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Peter PRICE
(Green Party)

There are many issues with cycling in Queen Edith’s that prevent those with certain needs from being able to use active transport including cycling. Some, such as the quality of road surfaces and absence of potholes may seem small issues to those not facing a lack of confidence or balance issues, and others require larger solutions such as relocating bus stops to the road side of bicycle lanes (as has been very effective implemented on Hills Road). If elected as a councillor my first priority would be to conduct a survey of residents to identify the barriers for them to choose active transport methods, in order to campaign for the most effective changes to prioritise active transport as part of a just transition to a low carbon, low air pollution future.

Shoaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Suhaib SHAHID
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Indira VADHIA
(Labour Party)

Some people are reluctant to cycle due to not feeling safe on the roads because of the excessive speed of some cars and volume of traffic. Less confident cyclists, such as myself, are worried about cars passing too closely. Some junctions, particularly the Perne Road/Cherry Hinton Road junction is regarded as very hazardous and needs to be reconfigured as a Dutch-style roundabout like the recently improved Fendon Road roundabout.

Junctions with signal-controlled traffic lights, should have “cyclists go first” priority signalling like the Long Road/Hills Road junction. This will make cyclists safer and also contribute to educating drivers to the needs of cyclists.

More people of all ages would cycle if there was a comprehensive network of good quality, segregated cycle ways throughout our area, like those on Hills Road. Yes, this will be difficult due to the shortage of road space but the emphasis on the needs of cars must shift to providing more safe space for cyclists and pedestrians.

Jacqui WHITMORE
(Green Party)

There are many issues with cycling in Queen Ediths that prevent those with certain needs from being able to use active transport including cycling. Some, such as the quality of road surfaces and absence of potholes or marked cycle lanes, may seem small issues to those not facing a lack of confidence or balance issues, and others require larger solutions such as relocating bus stops to the road side of bicycle lanes (as has been very effective implemented on Hill’s Road). If elected as a councillor my first priority would be to conduct a survey of residents to identify the barriers for them to choose active transport methods, in order to campaign for the most effective changes to prioritise active transport as part of a just transition to a low carbon, low air pollution future. 

Simon WHITMORE
(Green Party)

There are many issues with cycling in Queen Ediths that prevent those with certain needs from being able to use active transport including cycling. Some, such as the quality of road surfaces and absence of potholes may seem small issues to those not facing a lack of confidence or balance issues, and others require larger solutions such as relocating bus stops to the road side of bicycle lanes (as has been very effective implemented on Hill’s Road). If elected as a councillor my first priority would be to conduct a survey of residents to identify the barriers for them to choose active transport methods, in order to campaign for the most effective changes to prioritise active transport as part of a just transition to a low carbon, low air pollution future. 

Daniel ZAHEDI
(Labour Party)

Some people are reluctant to cycle due to not feeling safe on the roads because of the excessive speed of some cars and volume of traffic. Less confident cyclists, such as myself, are worried about cars passing too closely. Some junctions, particularly the Perne Road/Cherry Hinton Road junction is regarded as very hazardous and needs to be reconfigured as a Dutch-style roundabout like the recently improved Fendon Road roundabout.

Junctions with signal-controlled traffic lights, should have “cyclists go first” priority signalling like the Long Road/Hills Road junction. This will make cyclists safer and also contribute to educating drivers to the needs of cyclists.

More people of all ages would cycle if there was a comprehensive network of good quality, segregated cycle ways throughout our area, like those on Hills Road. Yes, this will be difficult due to the shortage of road space but the emphasis on the needs of cars must shift to providing more safe space for cyclists and pedestrians.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.