Elections

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Question 4 - we asked:

Incidents of dangerous driving and cycle theft in Cambridgeshire are continuing to increase and it is widely known that there is little the police will do about this due to a lack of resources. What should the government do to keep people safe while cycling?

We asked this question in these 3 constituencies: , Cambridge, South Cambridgeshire.

5 of the 11 candidates (45%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Those candidate(s) which were elected are highlighted.

Jeremy CADDICK
(Green Party)

Cuts to police numbers threaten social cohesion and widespread perception that the police will do little about cycle theft is a symptom of that. Policing and social cohesion are part of the Greens’ commitment to promoting equality.

Daniel ZEICHNER
(Labour Party)

Lack of enforcement is a key issue across a range of transport matters - better resourcing for policing in general is a key part of Labour’s promise in this election. The decline of traffic policing is well-known, and it will require strong central direction to ensure that some of that additional resource is allocated to this. The restoration of road safety targets, to which Labour is pledged, will help. Cycle theft remains too high, and it is extraordinary that train operator Abellio continues to fail to respond to the problems at the main railway station - I will continue to pursue them on this, and their dodged promises on additional cycle parking. I have also strongly supported British Cycling’s Turn the Corner campaign led by Chris Boardman - junction safety is vital, especially in a city like Cambridge.

Rod CANTRILL
(Liberal Democrat)

First we need more police. Sometimes there are only seven officers on duty covering the whole of Cambridge so it's not surprising that there aren't the resources to investigate cycle crime properly. Lib Dems want
20,000 more police across England and Wales - that's an extra thirty for Cambridge. With more police we can bring back proper community policing with eyes on the ground to investigate and deter cycle theft.

There's still too much dangerous driving that puts cyclists at risk. I support initiatives like Operation Close Pass which teach motorists to give cyclists the space they need, and more police will make enforcement of road safety easier.

However to truly make our roads safe for cyclists we need to change the way we design our roads so that vulnerable road users aren't brought into conflict with motorists so frequently. The proposed scheme for Madingley Road is an illustration of what can be done to achieve this.

Ian SOLLOM
(Liberal Democrat)

The most effective thing we can do to keep cyclists safe is to build segregated and attractive cycling infrastructure. Getting the police to take dangerous driving more seriously would at least reassure people that they will be supported if something happens - though whether that would result in better driving is less clear.
The numbers of thefts from the Cambridge station cycle park is quite shocking, as is the inability of the security set up to help victims catch thieves and retrieve their bikes. I would encourage the police to work closely with the operators of the cycle park to improve surveillance and deterrents to thieves.

Keith GARRETT
(Rebooting Democracy)

While I am asking for your vote I don't think that voting is a good thing in the way we do it. Without adequate preparation, voting is a very reactionary method of making a decision. The principle of deliberative democracy is that you are given time to assess the evidence and discuss it with your peers.

Given this voting for the head of the police force is a terrible idea. Knee jerk reactions to things happening in the media are bound to affect the result. The agenda for the police force needs to be set by the people after spending time considering the evidence and talking to those who are being affected. It would also take into account where police time is most effective. This would give a true reflection of the policing needs for the area.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.