Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: Trumpington

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Nicholas Brian AVERY  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Ceri GALLOWAY  (Green Party)
  • Richard Graham JEFFS  (Conservative Party)
  • Tim SYKES  (Labour Party)

Questions for Trumpington ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

As a general principle I support the separation to the maximum extent practical of motor traffic from cycling, and of cyclists from pedestrians.

Establishing clear and direct routes for safe and efficient cycling into the centre of Cambridge makes obvious sense. For Trumpington, the main routes are Hills Road and Trumpington Road with significant cross traffic along Long Road and Brooklands Avenue. Obviously there are proposals for Hills Road but all these routes need to be improved, especially where they intersect; there seems very little point in creating a new cycling super-highway that comes to an abrupt stop and simply deposits a great number of cyclists at a difficult intersection, such as the Trumpington Road/Fen Causeway/Lensfield Road mini-roundabouts. I would like to see proposals for each of these roads that recognizes that each is a significant cycle route but also is important for pedestrians and that drivers of motor vehicles have a legitimate right to be there also, especially residents needing to access their driveways.

Having established these spaces, it will be important that they are respected and, at the same time, that everyone remembers that there will be points where they intersect. Speed is a relevant consideration here – not just in determining the outcome of any accident but also in the various road/path user’s experience of his/her journey. Creating dedicated space is part of the solution we need – but the overriding consideration must be for each of us to ensure that we are not selfish in our use of the road/path.

Of course, the other main route into the city centre from Trumpington is to cycle beside the guided busway. Lighting this route will help to take pressure off the other routes in the winter months and developing other routes on disused rail lines – most notably the Chisholm Trail – ought to be a priority.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I agree that creating protected space in Hills Road in the areas where there are no segregated cycle paths and I would like to see the left hand lane going towards Addenbrookes to be enhanced by being segregated from motor traffic.
Where needed, similarly in Huntingdon Road.

Trumpington Ward where I stand would benefit from protected cycle path on the left hand side of Trumpington Road between Brooklands Ave and to the start of the cycle path at the park and ride that leads to the M11.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Hills Road, especially the bridge over the railway, could definitely do with changes being made. Perhaps we should wait until the protected spaces have been in use for a while to be able to pick-up on any issues and learn any lessons.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

Cambridge is a cycling city and therefore it is important to ensure the safety of cyclists. I would like to see more safety features in place around the city as there are some particularly narrow roads. The main route from Trumpington in Cambridge is quite a busy road and it already has a dedicated bus lane that cyclists can use. However this is not the care in other parts of the city and more needs to be done in future. One of the problems though is space in the city already.

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

If we were designing a modern city centre from scratch then we would place good car parking facilities outside a central ring which can be accessed only by bus, bike or on foot with exceptions for residents and traders needing access. Obviously, our city doesn’t look like that but, in principle, we should try and adopt solutions that move in that general direction where possible. A few rat-runs exist in North Newtown (around Panton Street, for example) that might well benefit from restrictions on motor vehicles at certain times of day, although it seems unlikely that closing roads completely is practical there given, for example, the high density of schools. Given that these streets serve different purposes at different times and on different days, perhaps different rules might apply - at weekends, for example.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I support the use of gates/bollards to stop motor vehicles using residential streets as rat runs. My concert about bollards is that motor cyclists may be more inclined to drive through than they are with gates. I would suggest looking at each point where this might be suitable and assessing each individually. It might be possible to use careful landscaping to reduce the gap to discourage motor bikes.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

No, I think there has already been too much blocking of roads. It's time to take a longer term look at Cambridge's roads as an entire network, expanding on one-way-systems with filter lanes and removing (or demoting to part-time) redundant traffic lights. These one-way systems could free-up part of the road for a Protected Space for cyclists. We also need to look at more innovative crossings such as underpasses or bridges whilst maintaining and improving the cycle network.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

I think this needs to be thoroughly reviewed. I want to see integrated reviews of the main routes in Cambridge. Time restrictions could be set up to allow traffic to pass through in off peak hours is also an option worth considering. I would also like to see a review of the city ring road which is dated and is not up to scratch for modern times. We need investment from central government and we hope to receive money as part of the city deal which is up for discussion in the coming months .

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

Better road/path infrastructure generally can only go so far in protecting children travelling to and from school. Parents should be encouraged to allow their children to walk or cycle to school wherever possible and extra traffic calming measures can be a part of this with lower speed limits generally at these hours and super-low speed limits in the immediate vicinity of schools. Temporary one-way routes can help and crossing patrols at crucial points can be used to assist not only in negotiating a particular junction or road but also as a visual cue to everyone of the need to take extra care. Becoming independent in travelling to and from school is one of the great moments in growing-up and I would not want to stifle that experience. Students need to be educated (including safe cycling skills) and information given to parents on the available safe route choices.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I would like to see a Dutch style off road cycling system for everybody. However, where children cycle to school and to and from leisure activities, improving the standard of cycling facilities is imperative. I would like to see an audit of all cycle routes used regularly by children and a plan of action for improving this. Where double parking restricts safe cycling for children in residential areas consultation with local residents to alleviate parking problems and to create barriers and road landscaping should be explored.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Implementing better visibility and reducing (and enforcing) speed limits around schools.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

A review should be carried out on the number of pupils using a bike to get to school before any decisive action is taken. It is almost certainly higher than the average as bikes are commonly used in the city. Young people should be protected on the roads as much as possible. I would certainly like to see increased protection outside primary schools and possibly for secondary schools as well depending on the use of the roads outside. Closing of the roads outside schools at the beginning and end of the school day could also be an option to consider.

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

The Grand Arcade cycle park is my bike park of choice. Its clear that there is appetite for more cycle parking throughout the city centre and converting space in the existing car parks would appear to be a good option and I would favour that over taking away extensive amounts of on-street car parking. I would be interested in understanding the extent to which the on-pavement cycle racks have become medium to long term storage solutions for cycle owners in the city centre rather than parking available for people traveling in and out on a regular basis.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

I am in favour of increasing cycle parking in the city centre as this is my main means of transport and I frequently find I am unable to get to appointments on time due to parking problems. I favour increased cycle parking in areas such as Sidney Street next to Lakelands and Rymans. Also along the pavement by John Lewis. And tarmac areas around the edge of green spaces where there is additional space not used by pedestrians. There are bound to be other areas which I do not frequent on a regular basis where this is also an issue. I also feel there are areas where cycle parking facilities could be SMARTer e.g. some of the older cycle racks may not be positioned as well as they could be or use outdated cycle wheel pinch type racks that can damage wheels. I would favour special cycle parking for older people and those with disabilities favouring a cycle blue badge system for those who are unable to walk far and need to park close to their destination or have limited hand function and find difficulty in carrying items to their bicycles. Safe cycle parking for parents with wide bicycles or those with trailers.

Increased underground and multi-storey cycle parking would help to alleviate parking problems in some areas and with consideration of the use of current car-parking to be used for bicycles.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Yes, certainly. The basement level of Park Street car park is a good example. People coming in to Cambridge to shop should be using the Park & Ride wherever possible. I would like to see "Boris Bikes" at the Park and Ride sites as well.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

As a cycling city we are already committed to cyclists in the city centre. I am particularly delighted to see a new 3000 cycle parking facility outside the train station. It is hoped that this will be open by December of next year. Reducing the amount of traffic in the city centre will also help with the number of cycling spaces in the town. After consultation with residents and businesses some parking spaces could be used however parking for disabled people must be protected.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

One of the joys of living in Cambridge is cycling across the green spaces – over Coe Fen and past the cows is my personal favourite. I agree with sensitive widening and lighting of these pathways and that this must not be done in a way that displaces pedestrians because one of the other joys of living in Cambridge is walking across the green spaces.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

As the population of Cambridge increases in the next few years and there is greater pressure in the city of joint use cycle paths segregation of pedestrians and cyclists may be essential. Currently there are times of the day there is already conflict of use of joint space. While and I am concerned about loss of green space to tarmac I would be prepared explore options for widening paths to reduce conflict of use, which will benefit everyone. Pedestrians often use cycle paths to walk on as they are often wider and smoother so there needs to be equity of surface for both types of user and clear signage about who can use each route.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Absolutely. These areas are perfect for safe, pleasant cycle routes.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

Existing paths such as the one on Midsummer Common should be widened to allow for safe use of bikes and pedestrians. However some responsibility should be on the cyclists themselves. Police should be ensuring that cyclists are using lights while on their bikes particularly in on Midsummer Common as it is common to see people with no lights when it gets dark and it is a danger to pedestrians who are walking along.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Nicholas Brian AVERY
(Liberal Democrat)

I support reduced speed limits generally in urban areas and, unsurprisingly therefore, would welcome the extension of the 20mph zone to roads in Trumpington. Signage is key but modern technology should enable us to have signs that provide the requisite information, including where the speed limit changes depending on the time of the day or day of the week. Some serious thought should be given to speed limits for cyclists also. I am not against enforcement via cameras, provided that the cameras are obvious.

Ceri GALLOWAY
(Green Party)

A 20 mph speed limit in residential areas not only benefits cycling safety particularly for children but also helps to create safer communities. Methods that help drivers to reduce their speed is careful planning of exits and entry to streets. I’m fully supportive of extension of 20 mph limits in south and west of the city.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

If there is a 20mph limit, it needs to be city-wide as it's difficult to know where the limits are at present. Drivers should be concentrating on traffic and pedestrians, not searching for an elusive 20 sign.

Tim SYKES
(Labour Party)

I am fully supportive of 20 mph speed limits on residential and other roads as long as they are enforced. I would like to see more light up signs used in the city which tells the driver how fast they are traveling. Sometimes a reminder is just as good as a ticket.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.