Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: Queen Edith's

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • John BERESFORD  (Labour Party)
  • Joel Henry CHALFEN  (Green Party)
  • Vince MARINO  (Conservative Party)
  • Tim MOORE  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for Queen Edith's ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

Yes, good idea.
Mowbray Road and Queen Edith's Way are also candidates for such provision.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

In Queen Edith's, the proposal is for protected space on Hills Road. I am all in favour of improving access and safety for cyclists. Cycling ought to be a healthy and sustainable option and Cambridge, with its culture of cycling, must be a beacon of good practice. If the evidence is there that these measures will achieve better access and safety, then I support it completely.

I have been sceptical however on two fronts. Firstly, practical: I cycle this route everyday and rarely if ever have I witnessed an accident. The one place I do see accidents, and often quite serious ones, is on the railway bridge where there are already very clear road-markings. To my mind, it is absolutely vital that road improvements do not confuse or take away from the need for those travelling the roads to communicate with each other. Whilst I am open to being told otherwise, things largely seem to work as things stand on Hills Road. Some of this has to do, I would propose, with the attention cyclists, drivers and pedestrians need to pay each other. Providing better cycle lanes and 'protected spaces' should not distract from this and we should not expect, I would argue, lines and raised edges to protect us by themselves.

Secondly, and more importantly really, is the procedure of consultation. Providing leaflets, however glossy, of the architectural options for these improvements is old-fashioned consultation dressed up. For the amount of money and disruption that will no doubt be expended on this project, a proper programme of community engagement ought to be in operation here. A programme that would yield the multiple needs of residents, cyclists, bus drivers, commuters, school and college students and ascertain how people use this route. And to ensure that means introducing a far-reaching change in terms of the democratic processes at the City and Council offices.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

I do support schemes for safer cycling in Cambridge,east rd,newmarket rd should also look at similar schemes

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

Separating motor vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians creates a safer, less collision prone, environment for all. The outcome of any collision is likely to have less severe consequences. I am very much in favour of providing good cycling and pedestrian routes, most especially on trunk roads into the city such as Hills Road, and on routes to schools and colleges. I remain a little concerned about cyclists recognising that some of the pedestrians crossing the cycle paths are disabled so cannot move fast, see well or hear warnings, and so would be in favour of clearly signing and marking these points, especially at floating bus stops.

I look forward to joined up route based planning, with special attention paid to accident hot spots so that, for example, it is safer to cycle to school (Hills Rd, Long Road) crossing the dangerous junctions at Addenbrooke’s, Long Road/Queen Edith’s Way, Cherry Hinton Road/Hills Road and the railway bridge.

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

In the City Centre, I can see the use.
In Queen Edith's it would be more problematical.
I know residents in Sedley-Taylor and Luard Roads are fed up with being used as a rat-run. I guess we could explore the feasibility of some sort of barrier between the two.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

These are very worthwhile measures in my opinion. The sooner the City can change people's expectation that we can take our car door-to-door and that the City is a car park the better. More importantly still, these measures dissuade the use of cars for quick, local journeys. Businesses (as well as public bodies) have a large role to play in supporting this and this kind of physical barrier cannot happen in isolation. But certainly residential streets are better for them. The next stage is ongoing investment along main routes helping those who have longer journeys to use the city.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

I would suggest it was a good idea to close the city centre from regent st between 10am and 3.00pm thiswould allow parents to pick up children before and after

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

As a public health doctor it is clear to me that reducing through motor traffic has many benefits including reduced local air pollution, slowing traffic within residential areas, reducing potential harm to all, but especially vulnerable old and the young.

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

Clearly 20mph limits around the school, but also persuading parents to organise other ways of getting children to school than by car.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

Schools can encourage cycling but cycling with children in Cambridge, as I am finding out, is quite scary! It should be possible to identify and support safe routes through the city with schools and playgrounds being the pins in the map. Where possible this should direct families through safer back routes but where necessary may require additional measures, such as lollipop women and men, to provide extra security.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

possibly free bus journeys between the hours proposed

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

A focus on creating safe routes to schools has significant health and community advantages; exercise is highly beneficial -children are encouraged to walk or cycle to school; air pollution and collision risk - parents can be discouraged from driving to and parking near schools, community backed initiatives such as walking crocodiles can be encouraged, visibility near the school is improved for cycles and road crossings.

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

Difficult balance. We don't want to discourage visitors or residents of South Cambridgeshire district from shopping in Cambridge. I'd certainly support more cycle parking places - I have difficulty finding one sometimes. Secure dry parking under the Arcade is very good practice.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

Yes, there does need to be more cycle parking and yes, I would support converting car parking spaces. Whilst we are still moving towards getting people out of their cars, it is difficult to compromise the advantages of cycling by creating less convenient cycle parks. Having more banks of cycle stands and rails dotted round is still possible. At the same time, the pressure on the City to keep up with its use makes this improvements appear to be cosmetic changes over a deeper issue. At this stage, I do not have an answer to this but would like to engage with those who know more.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

I dont believe the council has looked into underground cycle parking with automatic retrieval of bycicles

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

Disabled parking bays and drop-off and pick-up locations are important for disabled individuals and loading larger items. Otherwise there is no reason, in non-residential areas near the City centre, to provide much on street parking so cycle parking could readily be increased. Clearly there are not enough safe cycle lock-up points in the City centre.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

Yes.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

Absolutely. Some of these paths - for example Coldham's Common path seen above which I use fairly often - are in bad shape and not well lit. These are commuter routes as well as leisure trails and it would good to see more of these, more of them improved, and more of them signposted as good to use.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

definetly

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

Both cycling and walking should be encouraged, but where there is a narrow path jointly used it makes good sense to provide separate paths where there is sufficient space and it can be done sensitively.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

John BERESFORD
(Labour Party)

It is often difficult to travel at more than 20 mph in parts of Queen Edith's, given the daily parking congestion, so any limit in the streets east of Cherry Hinton Road and west of Worts' Causeway would be no hardship, I suspect.

Joel Henry CHALFEN
(Green Party)

PLEASE NOTE: I have only just received this questionnaire.

20mph zones are very important. I tend to prefer priority signposting over speed bumps. But again, as a councillor, I would need to engage with the research to really know what works best.

Vince MARINO
(Conservative Party)

I am sorry i do not agree ,i feel 20mph should be held centrally only as traffic needs to flow quicker on the outskirts,with the increase of vehicles and population traffic will come to a standstill

Tim MOORE
(Liberal Democrat)

As a direction of travel 20mph zones make sense: lower fatality rate with collisions and less permanent damage; where younger children live this is more important. Residents deserve a safe environment. Many are still wedded to their car so the speed of travel should take residents with them as much as possible.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.