Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: King's Hedges

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Anette KARIMI  (Conservative Party)
  • Michael Philip POTTER  (Green Party)
  • Martin SMART  (Labour Party)
  • Ian TYES  (Independent)
  • Neale UPSTONE  (Liberal Democrat)

Questions for King's Hedges ward candidates (6 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

As far as I can tell, I do support the Protected Space schemes. Though I have lived in Cambridge many years and when I was younger in Arbury, before North Arbury was built, I would need to spend some time, walking around the Kings Hedges area if elected to know better the case for cyclists and to pick up pointers from local residents. Though I have mainly been a cyclist during my time in Cambridge, I did drive a car whilst I was a carer. Now retired, I rely on public transport and walking.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Yes, fully support these protected space for cyclist schemes and would like to see more across the city where roads are wide enough. 
Hills Road and Huntingdon Road are fortunate to be quite wide roads compared to many of the road in Cambridge and have the space to accommodate protected routes for cyclists. Cherry Hinton Road is an obvious candidate for having a protected space route for cyclists as it is heavily used by commuter cyclists in particular. The junctions along the route also need to be made safer for cyclists, particularly at the Perne Road roundabout and the Robin Hood pub.) East Road to Newmarket Road also needs radical re-engineering with extensive protected space and routes for cyclists. 
In Kings Hedges Ward, Milton Road and Kings Hedges Road are wider and may be able to provide protected cycling spaces. However, there are also problems with smaller roads, for example St Kilda, where the road is narrow, but the pavement is narrow too and cyclists are unwelcome, so caught between a rock and a hard place. Space for cyclists needs to be addressed on all routes to encourage bicycle usage in a safe and enjoyable way.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

Yes. These two roads are wide enough for cycle lanes to be protected from the main carriageway. Much of the road space is currently wasted anyway and could be better used. There are too many junctions with right turns along these roads and I would propose banning most right turns into minor roads along the whole town stretch to make them safer. In Kings Hedges the roads are not really wide enough to create the safe space, but as part of a network of connected and signed cycle routes, i would like to see protected space taken partly from the pavements as well as alongside some of the footpaths off road.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

I'd prefer to see protected space on far more roads. In Kings Hedges and roads used by residents, there are a number of roads with high cycle traffic where the cycle provision needs the same sort of step-change as proposed for Hills Road and Huntingdon Road.
Those roads include: Arbury Road; Kings Hedges Road; Milton Road within the ward, and Green End Road, Carlton Way and Histon Road, which are outside the ward but well used by residents.

We need consistent schemes, not the sort of mixed/ambiguous priorities which in my opinion are a danger. Milton Road has recently seen a tragic accident, and is a road where there are numerous different cycle 'provisions' (sharing with pedestrians, sharing with buses and taxis, MCL.

We need a masterplan of transformation to take however long it takes, and for that to include the potential for tunnelled roads (e.g. smaller scale versions of http://www.arcadis.com/Projects/Tunnelling_and_area_development_A2_motorway_Maastricht.aspx) as part of a long term plan.

There is not a problem of finance, just the way that we in the UK finance infrastructure.

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

Removing through motor traffic is a very good thing where possible, I support the idea where I can, and even support cycle free streets in some circumstances. Due to apparent lacks in past planning, and our transport needs not being catered for basically in a more community friendly way, it is difficult to fully consider how to work with residents who do not know how to manage without cars. If elected I would be pleased to work with other councillors and public consultations and experts on ways to reduce traffic and pollution, noise and danger.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Would like to see motor traffic restrictions expanded in residential streets. Increasing the number of one way streets and reducing the road space for cars to make room for protected cycle routes should become a city wide consideration, subject to getting the detail right.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

As long as through routes for bicycles are maintained then this is one possibility for improving the quality of life in side roads and rat runs. There are few examples in Kings Hedges, but Lovell Road and Ramsden Square spring to mind as places where closing the road half-way or making it one way will reduce/remove the use as rat runs. However, it is necessary to look at the overall picture and produce a fully inter-connected transport policy rather than piece-meal bits of improvements.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Regarding the city centre, I think the restrictions work. I do think we need to deal with north/south motor transport capacity issues. A guided-busway link from the new Science Park station across to Newmarket Road could help. We need some circular routes for buses without everything going via the center.

Residential schemes certainly help reclaim communities for cycling walking and even community events. I support those that exist and would consider others on their merits.

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

What initially comes to mind is some sort of scheme whereby children can be escorted to pick up points if need be, similar to park and ride schemes. If parents and families actually live in the school area, then it seems mostly unecessary to use cars to ferry the children to and from school. Where they live some distance away from the school, then a park and ride like scheme or school buses and free school bus passes might be a way forward. Free bus passes might seem a much easier option when there would be a state owned public transport system.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Protected space routes for cyclists should be included on roads leading to schools. The city does have large numbers of children using cycles to get to school and this will increase if safer routes are provided. Closing roads outside schools to motor traffic should also be considered an option (as happens in some countries). This would encourage parents to stop using their vehicles for the “school run” and promote more walking and cycling to school.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

I prefer the use of school buses to cars to take people to school and would like to see minimum distances reduced so that more people could use school buses. As part of an integrated transport policy, the network of safe cycle routes must include routes to schools as well as other key journeys. I would also like to see school terms and start/end times staggered to avoid rush hour and to spread the 'holidays' through the year to reduce congestion during term time. I would like to see variable speed limits rather than fixed - so that outside schools at start/end of the day there is a 10mph limit, but 30mph the rest of the time. I would like the car parking laws enforced at schools to avoid the appalling chaos as parents park on double yellows and zigzags rather than safely. If parking at schools was made more difficult and alternate transport made easier then there would be less congestion at these times.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Stronger enforcement of 20mph limits in school areas with particular reference to reported dangerous drivers. I think average speed cameras could be considered for critical areas. We also need to look at root causes of "adventurous" driving in the young.
A re-think of the urban space where there are challenges. I think there are plenty of places in Cambridge where walking space is too restricted and is next to a busy road.
Naturally, for cycling, segregated routes would already help.

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

It does seem that cycle parking might best be prioritised in the city centre. Park and ride schemes might need improving to facilitate the problem people have with shopping loads, since I imagine nowadays many car users have become dependent on car assited shopping to deal with the weekly shopping load. Maybe there is room for some sort of local council run delivery system to replace the need for car boots. Could the park and ride scheme be upgraded somehow to help shoppers deal with getting loads back to their cars? Similarly, I feel that rubbish collection of large items which is another situation where car ownership seems to some desirable, should be something that is local council funded with no charges for the residents who are obliged to get rid of old furniture etc.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

After full consultation with residents and businesses, some car parking spaces may be sacrificed for cycle parking. But parking for disabled must be protected. If there is a trend to restrict motor traffic access to the City, creating car-free, pedestrian and cycle only zones in the city centre, the consequence of this should be more space available for cycle parking.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

Yes. I would like to see better designed bicycle racks so that more than 2 bikes can use each hoop. I would also like parking time limits on bike racks so that dumped bicycles can be removed more quickly freeing up space for genuine cyclists.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, where other options don't exist. I'd also support using video surveillance of cycle parking to facilitate the rapid removal of abandoned bikes. City centre cycle parking should be short term to get the best use of the space.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

Yes, I would support this. The matter of preserving the safety of pedestrians is very important. There should be regulation to ensure that cyclists give way to pedestrians where they share path space. Ideally, cyclists and pedestrians should each have dedicated space. It would be nice to see some social facilities in some areas accesible along these routes, such as cafes and toilet facilities. Not that I am against private enterprise but it would seem a good idea to me to have council run initiatives of this kind, which might also mean that there was sufficient warden care in these areas to make things safer for more vulnerable people. It might secure some steady local employment, care and service related to such schemes.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

The cycle and pedestrian paths across some of the green spaces in Cambridge are having increasing usage and I support the widening of existing paths where necessary. The paths across Midsummer Common, for example, need to be widened to make them safer for cyclists and pedestrians.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

Yes. I strongly dislike shared use footpaths - particularly when they are not marked at all (like Elizabeth Way bridge!), and when they involve huge numbers of dangerously blind junctions (like Milton Road). As part of an integrated network of cycle routes (rather than as happens now - random bits of cycle paths), then yes - properly separating pedestrians and cyclists would make the whole process of travelling much safer for everyone.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Definitely. Some paths are currently not appropriate to call "shared use"

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Anette KARIMI
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Michael Philip POTTER
(Green Party)

Definitely, since it first began I have felt that the 20mph scheme should be city wide. Whilst I was a car driver I felt this strongly, from my perception of the relationship between myself as a driver and cyclists and pedestrians. Personally, I am convinced that with such a speed limit, overall, traffic flow and journey time are improved.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Fully support 20 mph speed limits for residential and specific other streets across the whole city and committed to positive consultation with residents who are supporting this initiative. Enforcement will need to be addressed, and further education. Placing of signs that state “Welcome to Cambridge. You are now entering a 20 mph City” on strategic points on entry roads should be considered along with traffic activated mobile speed indicator signs on particular roads, for example, Coleridge Road.

Ian TYES
(Independent)

20 mph speed limits are a waste of time and money and a futile symbolic gesture. Those drivers who ignored the 30mph speed limt are not going to observe 20mph, so the only people affected are the existing safe drivers. Accidents mostly happen at junctions not inbetween junctions. I would rather spend the half million on improving junction visibility, closing off right turns, making traffic lights respond to traffic properly and bicycles in particular, properly painting white lines on cycle routes and in particular on shared use footpaths so everyone knows which side to use and persuading home owners to cut their high hedges on dangerous blind junctions.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes.
I'd like to see a review of speeds once the schemes are rolled out, and to look at 'flashing 20' warning signs in areas people may speed accidentally.
I also think we need a clamp-down on persistent careless/reckless drivers. PCSO's should have more powers to help with this.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.