Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (City), May 2014: Coleridge

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2014.
Polling date: Thursday 22nd May 2014
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Donald Marshall ADEY  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Sam BARKER  (Conservative Party)
  • Shaun Peter ESGATE  (Green Party)
  • Lewis HERBERT  (Labour Party)
  • the dragon fairy PUFFLES  (Independent)

Questions for Coleridge ward candidates (7 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7 

# Question 1

Protected Space on main roads: The County Council have recently consulted on creating protected space on Hills Road and Huntingdon Road. Do you support these schemes? Are there roads in your ward or elsewhere that you would like to see protected space on?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Support. When I was a County, City, and District Cllr before I always strongly supported cycle promotion.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

I support good, safe cycle lanes and protected space is a brilliant option where the road is wide enough. Although Having had friends hit by cars on London's cycling super highways, I am concerned that protected lanes on the pavement side can still fail to make junctions safe for cyclists.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

My views on this and other issues are also in Richard Taylor’s film of the Cycling Campaign hustings. I support protected space for cyclists and want to see more protected space on main roads where roads are wide enough.
Hills Road and Huntingdon Road are wide roads compared to many roads in Cambridge and have the space for investment to create quality protected space routes, as has occurred in places like London. Detailed design needs to take acccount of the needs also of pedestrians and disabled people.
In Coleridge ward, part of Cherry Hinton Road is a potential candidate for a protected space route for cyclists as it is heavily used by commuter cyclists. The junctions along the route also need to be made safer for cyclists, particularly at the Perne Road roundabout and the Robin Hood pub.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

As a regular walker/cyclist/public transport user along Hills Road, the biggest problem/danger I have with the current set up is it not being clear after dark which bit of the pavement is one for cyclists & which is for pedestrians. So anything that makes things much more clearer for all users is welcome.

One of the things I would ***love*** to explore at a city-wide community action event is getting lots of people together (perhaps working with schools and colleges) to get lots of ideas where new/enhanced cycling corridors could be. Then have them properly road-marked, signed and publicised. Personally I'd like to see traffic lights rather than a roundabout at the Cherry Hinton Road/Perne Road junction. I've always hated that roundabout as a cyclist.

# Question 2

Remove through motor traffic: Most motor traffic cannot go through the city centre. In residential areas, some streets are closed to motor vehicles at certain points. Do you support this idea, and would you like to see it more widely used?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Support. A further closure of drummer st is required to cut out rat running by cars. Bollards are needed. This will both improve bus flow and make it easier and safer for cyclists.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

I think we should wage a war for good, safe cycling, not against cars. I fear that poor planning can concentrate ever more traffic onto fewer and fewer roads. We must accept that people in Cambridge are often car dependent for work and family reasons. At the same time, the ideal for local safety, and local and global pollution is more cycling and less driving.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

I want to see integrated reviews of main routes, a review of car restrictions on selected residential streets, and a review of roads near the Inner Ring Road. I want more space for protected cycle routes, pedestrians and additional bus routes in the city centre, not easy with the limited road space. Labour Councillors will specifically ask that the county council develop a new ‘City Centre Transport Strategy’ including
- reviewing the Inner Ring Road
- pressing for City Deal money to be spent on better junctions and investment that increases travel into and around Cambridge by bus, cycle and foot instead of cars, and
- reducing the number of HGVs needing to use the Inner Ring Road.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

For me, this is a 'yes-but'.

I like the idea of removing through-motor traffic where for example it's part of creating longer cycle and pedestrian routes, or where there is a danger to young children outside primary schools.

At the same time, some caution has to be used if police can demonstrate that such schemes might make law enforcement more of an issue. But that is just as much of a public planning issue in 'designing out crime' in housing developments as a transport issue.

Again, I'd like to see us move away from 'piecemeal' schemes to city-wide ones that can have a greater positive cumulative impact that make both cycling and walking safer and more pleasurable, rather than just making things awkward for the motorist in the hope it will put the latter off driving.

# Question 3

Safe routes to schools: What measures would you like to see to improve the safety of children getting to school?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Further cycle priority on routes to schools. Expanded parking restrictions around schools. The "school run" is a national disgrace. Children should walk or cycle in nearly every case.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

I'm not sure there are generic solutions. Good cycling infrastructure, support for adults to accompany children, and engagement with governors and PTA s would be a good start. We will also have to make compromises given that schools were suited long before integrated infrastructure plans were contemplated.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

Protected space for cyclists should also be included on roads leading to schools. The city does have large numbers of children using cycles to get to school and this will increase if safer routes are provided, and numbers arriving by car reduced. Closing roads outside appropriate schools to motor traffic should also be considered as an option. This would discourage more parents from using their vehicles for the “school run” and promote more walking and cycling to school.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

The bigger public policy question is the concept of 'parental choice and using competition between schools to drive up standards' - which I have issues with. Personally I'd like to see we as a city getting behind all of our schools, working together to both raise standards and make them enjoyable places for staff and students to be and learn. But then I completely understand why any parent would not want to send their child to a school that is seen to be failing and/or where their child does not want to go.

The reason why this matters is because of the impact long commutes children and students have to make to get to school/college every day. Parents driving their children to school on the 'school run' can sometimes be a danger to other children, as well as generating extra traffic.

Thus there is only so far localised schemes can go without dealing with the national picture too. That said, one measure I would like to see is PCSOs regularly outside school gates meeting parents and children - their presence hopefully reducing the number of parking offences outside schools. Also, I'd like to get the views of staff, children and students about what they think needs to be improved outside their schools. What are their solutions? This could be done as part of a citizenship project in partnership with yourselves and the councils.

# Question 4

Cycle-friendly town centres: Cycle parking is at a premium in Cambridge city centre. Although the City Council are putting in more, it is unlikely to be enough. Would you support converting some car parking to cycle parking, and do you have any further suggestions?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Support. For each car space some 8/10 cycles can be parked. Remove 20 car park spaces, promote and monitor.
Some car parking spaces in residential streets can be turned into cycle parking. The public have supported this trial in Romsey.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

Yes, alongside a crack down on abandoned or long term parked cycles, and provided it can be done cost effectively. I would also be keen to explore whether, as with parking charges, there would be benefits to businesses of better cycling infrastructure.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

It is great that there will be a new 3,000 capacity cycle parking facility at the Rail Station, after a debate involving the Cycling Campaign and Councillors for well over 5 years, and now a start date of September 2014, with opening we hope in December 2015.

After full consultation with residents and businesses, some car parking spaces may be sacrificed for cycle parking but access and parking for disabled people must be protected. Reduced cars in the city centre would free up more space for cycle parking.

We are also committed to expanding the secure cycle parking facility under the Grand Arcade, subject to detail beeing resolved and agreement reached with Grand Arcade and others affected, and to seeking an extra location for a further City Centre cycle park given that City Deal funding is potentially available.
Measures to stop secure cycle parks ‘silting up’ will be needed. They should be used for a day or two, not to leave bikes for a month or more.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

1) Yes - but in combination with safer routes into and out of the city as well as cheaper bus access. Remember it's the modal change from car to other forms of transport we want.

2) Again, I feel that we could run this as part of a large community transport planning day, asking residents and students where they think we could have new cycling spaces. Where are the places they go to regularly that could really do with increased cycling provision? While I have my ideas (such as increasing the space at Parkers Piece), I want both the process and the numbers of people taking part to give much greater legitimacy in the minds of citizens. This would avoid accusations that local authorities were responding to a well-organised campaign group. I think this would also allow the Cycling Campaign to reach out to new, younger audiences too.

# Question 5

Cycle routes in green spaces: The commons and greens provide well-used pleasant cycle routes through the city. Would you support some widening of the paths, undertaken sensitively, to reduce conflict between pedestrians and cyclists?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Support. Coldhams common is crying out fir wider cycle paths. Long overdue. The route from mill road to cherry Hinton (centre) also badly needs to be widened.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

Yes

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

The cycle and pedestrian paths across Cambridge parks are experiencing increased usage and I support the widening of existing paths where necessary. Several paths across Midsummer Common, for example, need to be widened to make them safer for both cyclists and pedestrians, and people concerned about this consulted before any changes.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

Yes - definitely. In particular I'd like to see them made safer, particularly for people late at night.

# Question 6

20mph speed limits: Public consultation has brought 20mph zones to the North area of the city. The consultation for the East area also received general public support. Do you support the scheme? Do you support extending it to rest of Cambridge, i.e. South and West/Central? If so, what measures would you like to see to help encourage compliance?

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

Support. Compliance is difficult to achieve. Some mobile speed traps. We also need more compliance with cycles having lights at night.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

No, the average speed on mill road was 20mph even before the changes. I'd much prefer infrastructure and enforcement costs went into better cycling facilities, and wider anti social behaviour and crime.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

I fully support 20 mph speed limits for residential and specific other streets across the whole city and am committed to positive consultation with residents, including on adjacent major roads which are also suitable for 20mph. I am concerned at elements of the scheme introduction, particularly on the 3Es - enforcement, the need for some road engineering and further education, including increased and more engaging signage, and ‘You are now entering a 20 mph City’ on strategic points and entry roads. I also want traffic activated mobile speed signs tested on particular roads, for example, Coleridge Road. Trialling of average speed enforcement should also be considered for long roads with excessive speed.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

In the grand scheme of things, I'm open-minded on it. (Not least because I haven't explored the evidence-bases are). I'd like to see what the results of the north area experience is. Did it reduce average speeds? Did it reduce pollution levels? Did it reduce congestion? Did it reduce accidents? Did it result in an increase in cycling/public transport use? What was the public's response to it? How many people who were at first against it changed their minds?

Again, if widened, I would not want to see this as a 'standalone' scheme, but one that was clearly part of a wider planned and co-ordinated group of measures to reduce pollution, traffic congestion, as well as increasing road safety and encouraging people to use other means of transport, especially for short journeys.

# Question 7

Would you reinstate the full-time Cycling Officer position, or even expand this to two full-time posts? This post has been crucial in the past for scrutinising new developments for cycling-related issues, as well as developing work to encourage responsible cycling.

Donald Marshall ADEY
(Liberal Democrat)

I would like to support this post again. Funding for local government is very tight. I would need to consult with colleagues to see how we could re -establish this post. I suspect it would be most difficult to add a 2nd post.

Sam BARKER
(Conservative Party)

These are tough fiscal times, and we must use money wisely. My support for all these initiatives is in the context of tighter budgets which are increasingly drawn down for statutory social care provision. I would probably prefer a formal role for the cycling campaign and other actors in an open policy and decision making process.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Lewis HERBERT
(Labour Party)

There are other options to ensure the same impacts of a FT post. With the growth in population and in cycling by people of all ages, the next tranche of cycle related initiatives mean we need to review the dedicated cycling staffing for new schemes. We and the county will need staff ensure quality design for all cycling measures that can be funded by the City Deal and other funding.
We will also review to ensure there is sufficient specialist cycling staffing input to planners for new development, big and small. These roles are probably best filled by specialists rather than appointing a single, generalist person.

the dragon fairy PUFFLES
(Independent)

Yes - personally I'd go for two full-time posts because of the scale of developments happening in Cambridge that really could do with 'cycle-proofing'. Furthermore, I'd like to see citizens engaging with developers 'at design stage', and greater transparency between developers and council officers in the discussions they have. All too often I feel that developments are 'dumped' on Cambridge by wealthy interests that have few roots in the city.

The question big-picture-wise is how to fund it. Because Cambridge City Council does not have much control over its income - much of it comes from a central government grant that has shrunk significantly in recent years. Hence why the other parties that have looked into this in detail could produce a few options about what the impact would be of employing 1 or two full time cycling officers. The point being that while I back the principle of 2 FT officers, the city needs to make an informed decision. It might be at this stage we cannot afford 2, but that come 2017 we might be able to.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.