Elections

Cambridge City Council elections, May 2023: Petersfield

Summary: Elections to Cambridge City Council in May 2023
Polling date: Thursday 4th May 2023
Ward:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE  (Green Party)
  • Paul Jonathan ROPER  (Conservative Party)
  • Katie THORNBURROW  (Labour Party)

Questions for Petersfield ward candidates (5 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5 

# Question 1

Many local residents lack access to somewhere secure to park their cycles. Without on-street cycle parking, cycles are often left blocking the pavement. It has been disappointing to see that consultations on residents’ parking zones have not addressed this issue or asked local people about their cycle parking needs.

Would you support the introduction of residential cycle parking in streets where residents request them?

Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes

Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE
(Green Party)

Yes! I absolutely recognise the importance of providing safe and secure bicycle parking facilities for residents who rely on cycling as their means of transportation. Lack of secure cycle parking discourages people from cycling and causes obstructions and inconvenience for pedestrians.

Green-led Brighton and Hove City Council has successfully rolled out over 100 ‘Residents’ Cycle Hangars’ in place of car parking spaces, which have received enormous demand by local residents. Cambridge can learn from this example and explore similar options to provide secure cycle parking in residential areas.

Consultations on residents’ parking zones should always include questions about cycle parking needs to ensure that all residents' concerns are taken into account, not just drivers.

Paul Jonathan ROPER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

Yes - secure on-street parking for bikes could make a real difference.

Changes to a residential street that might come about as part of the opportunity to bring in or change a residential parking scheme should be as broad as possible in my opinion and include cycle parking.

A recent consultation for York Area focused on the number and location of parking places for residents or visitors only but I have asked the consultation body, the Greater Cambridge partnership, that if residents wish consideration should be given to broader changes. These include street trees, community cars, EV charge points, and more and secure cycle parking.

I support all these ideas and have raised this with the GCP, and have ensured that these wider possibilities are promoted in leaflets and conversations Petersfield Labour has about parking so residents know they can ask for them.

# Question 2

The Mill Road bus gate will be implemented soon. This presents an opportunity for many improvements so that the street can become a safer and more attractive place for people to visit and shop. What changes would you install to make better use of the space freed-up from queueing traffic?

Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD
(Liberal Democrat)

As a local councillor, I would commit to regularly engaging with Mill Road 4 People (as well as other groups, and residents at large) to listen and consult on the work needed to make Mill Road the best it can be. Change is needed - but we also need to work hard to build consensus, because the recent closure showed us how vital it is that all stakeholders feel consulted as change is made. And as a Liberal Democrat councillor, I would look to take all opportunities to continue the work of my Lib Dem colleagues in reducing car journeys citywide - having a positive impact on walking, cycling and businesses on Mill Road.

Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE
(Green Party)

Work is getting underway to design and implement the bus gate for this Summer, and this provides a period of time in which the Council must consult with local residents and businesses about exactly what changes should be made to maximise the benefits of the bus gate.

Pavement widening could create more space for pedestrians, cafes, and shops. This would help to create a safer and more attractive environment for all road users, and encourage more people to use local shops on foot. Additionally, segregated cycle lanes would make the road safer for cyclists. Currently, this is not the case on much of Mill Road and I’ve experienced trouble myself on some narrow stretches.

Paul Jonathan ROPER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

The shops and restaurants on Mill Road are a vital part of the Petersfield community, and help make the ward such great place to live and work. We have to ensure that we help them thrive as we reduce through traffic.

The first step is to understand the pressures and opportunities that the road restriction will cause - and carefully plan to resolve the problems created for businesses. We will need to work with businesses and delivery services to achieve the best outcome for them, balanced with the new opportunities for pedestrians and cyclists.

Assuming we can sort out how deliveries for businesses work, we can think about how to enable the spaces outside the buildings to be enjoyed more and used for other purposes. I think that there will be many more people crossing the road - this could be school children going to school, people going to work or to the station, and stopping by the shops along both sides. One of the highlights of the year is the Mill Road fair - perhaps parts of the fair could happen more often. It will be good to get everyone involved to deciding what might be best for everyone.

# Question 3

The 2021 census shows that 46.9% of households in Petersfield do not have a car or van. What would you do to broaden the quality and affordability of transport options for non-car owners of all ages to improve access to education, jobs, healthcare and services?

Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD
(Liberal Democrat)

1. Improve and broaden pavement space - for accessibility, for extra bike parking, and for the use by local cafes, restaurants and other businesses. We could also enhance Mill Road's pavements with more street furniture and greenery
2. Full commitment to a modernised, well-funded public transport system, meeting the needs of Mill Road and the surrounding area, to reduce car traffic
3. Investigation of and consultation on a Business Improvement District to support the local businesses that make Mill Road so special.

Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE
(Green Party)

Bus services in the city are still too expensive and infrequent, and do not serve residents well. Lack of good public transport provision deepens inequalities by further disadvantaging people who can't afford to live close to where most jobs are, or to run a car.

Bluntly, we need to de-prioritise driving and prioritise sustainable public transport. I believe that a road-charging scheme will be a useful tool, so long as it reflects the reality of the cost-of-living crisis and makes clear a full list of exemptions for the most disadvantaged residents. In order to fund an improved bus service in the short-term, Cambridge Green Party would introduce a Workplace Parking Levy, basically a tax paid by large employers on staff parking bays. The money raised by this levy would be invested in urgent improvements to our public transport.

Furthermore, despite having a relatively high cycling rate, Cambridge has potential to do even better by implementing a fully interconnected, properly segregated cycle network which is maintained to high standards. Active travel actually saves people money, and has further health and wellbeing benefits. And of course, as the example of residents’ parking zones shows, when transport consultations occur, they need to be less car-centric than they currently are and look more seriously at prioritising active travel measures.

Paul Jonathan ROPER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

There are lots of non-car options. Apart from bicycles and the common public transport options of buses and trains I think we need to support shared-use vehicles of all types. For example, the dial-a-ride minibuses, which is an on-demand service of wheelchair adapted minibuses, should be expanded hugely and financially supported by local government. We should be aiming to triple the number of them is Cambridge and ensure that they are all electric vehicles.

And while access to a car will continue to be needed by many residents it would be great if the number of shared or community cars meant that residents could more easily choose to give up car ownership. I think that we need an extensive community or shared car scheme across the city. This has started with the council working with Enterprise Cars, but we need many more shared cars, across the whole city and all electric.

# Question 4

The latest work on the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Local Transport Plan has shown that it would not be possible to meet local and national climate targets with a switch to electric motor vehicles alone. The Combined Authority has summarised a list of the interventions which could be integrated into the region's transport plan to assist with carbon reduction: which of these do you think are most needed in your area to help reduce car mileage and improve sustainable transport?

Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD
(Liberal Democrat)

Speaking with residents on roads affected by rat-running, it's clear that there are lots of possible solutions - including a wide array of traffic calming measures - and lots of strong feelings. I'd look to support a full, official consultation of residents on affected streets to find out which measures are favoured. I would also lobby our County Council for better enforcement of 20mph zones, and support the work to cut down on car journeys citywide - reducing the need for rat-running.

Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE
(Green Party)

An immediate measure which could reduce car mileage is to introduce a Workplace Parking Levy. Other councils, such as in Nottingham, have done this already and there’s no reason we can’t follow suit in Cambridge. It could be set in place relatively quickly, and at a low administrative cost, providing interim funding for the bus network improvements the Combined Authority wants to see.

Another measure I’ve emphasised in other answers is major improvements to our cycling infrastructure (segregation, segregation, segregation!).

Furthermore, reduced public transport fares are a no-brainer! We would introduce a ‘£1 fare to take you there’ policy, and make bus travel free for young people, which would help many families and students in Petersfield. Finally, I would again point to Green-led Brighton and Hove City Council which has introduced a large fleet of low-emissions buses to operate within the city’s low-emissions zone. Therefore, I would also prioritise the ‘Ultra Low Emissions Buses’ proposal.

Paul Jonathan ROPER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

For me, rail is key. The number of users of Cambridge station has increased by over 600% since 2014, mainly through increasing the length and frequency of trains, and of course Cambridge North is well-established and the Cambridge South station is being built. The main station is in our ward and will remain the main point of arrival for people coming to our beautiful city.

I hope we can encourage rail - the East-West Rail link (when built) will have a significant impact, but there are other ways to reduce the number of cars driven into and out of the city. I believe that we need to double the track to Newmarket, target 2 trains per hour for all stations, and build a new station to the east of Cambridge.

I also think that road freight should be moved to rail. The government have the target of no more diesel trucks of trains by 2040. We have the technology to have electric trains, but not for electric heavy goods vehicles. If there was the Ely Area Capacity Enhancements as well as some freight capacity on East West Rail, it has been shown that 90% of road freight could be removed from roads around Cambridge.

I wrote about the need to invest in rail for RailEast https://katiethornburrow.com/2022/12/rail-is-key-to-cambridges-future/

# Question 5

What is your personal experience of walking and cycling in your area? What do you think discourages local people from choosing active travel options for everyday journeys?

Emmanuel Marie Michel CARRAUD
(Liberal Democrat)

Mill Road is a hugely important part of our community, and the broader city. We absolutely have to do better to make it safer for pedestrians, cyclists and those with disabilities; to make the air cleaner and safer to breathe; and to protect and champion the businesses that make it so special. As a councillor, I would work for progress in all of these areas, while pushing for a city-wide approach that leaves no street or area of Cambridge feeling left out or worse off for the work we do elsewhere (especially applicable to traffic reduction).

Joshua MORRIS-BLAKE
(Green Party)

I’ve been cycling around Petersfield and most of the city since I moved to Cambridge. Considering the general outside perceptions about Cambridge being this amazing city for cycling, I’ve been fairly underwhelmed and think there’s so much more our council could be doing to make Cambridge’s roads safer and greener. Most obviously, there is still a real lack of segregated cycling infrastructure; some very limited routes have been created but certainly not enough to assure less confident cyclists that they won’t have to come into contact with large vehicles just to get to work, school or university. The other major problem is the lack of safe bike parking, including on major roads such as East Road. If cycling is not safe and convenient, many people who would otherwise happily get on a bike understandably feel reluctant to do so.

I and the Green Party want to create fairer, greener communities, and improving our public transport systems is the perfect place to start!

Paul Jonathan ROPER
(Conservative Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Katie THORNBURROW
(Labour Party)

I walk or cycle for about 95% of my trips in Cambridge. Right now my worries about cycling are the number and size of pot holes, particularly when filled with rain water, and the road traffic. I’m learning to live with e-scooters as fellow road users. Pot holes need to fix properly so that the repairs last.

I enjoy cycling and have a road bike and an electric Urban Arrow cargo bike (supplied by Outspoken!) that we use for most of our shopping. https://katiethornburrow.com/2018/11/looking-at-cargo-bikes/

I think that all school students of whatever age should be able to and encouraged to cycle to school without crossing a busy road. I think that the proposed alterations to Newmarket Road and Mill Road will help to achieve this.

I also think that we need to fix our footpaths and keep them clutter-free, have many more secure cycle parking for homes, visitors and businesses, and more benches for those walking around but needing to rest along the way.

Finally, we need to design our urban spaces to prioritise walking, cycling and pedalling, and public transport - as stated in the council’s sustainable design and construction supplementary planning document. As a member of the planning committee I have pushed developers to plan for walkers and cyclists in their schemes, most notably in the plans for the area north of the rail station.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.