Elections – Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Elections

Local elections (County), May 2013: Romsey

Summary: Elections to Cambridgeshire County Council in May 2013.
Polling date: Thursday 2nd May 2013
Division:
Candidates
(by surname):
  • Marjorie Ruth BARR  (UK Independence Party)
  • Kilian BOURKE  (Liberal Democrat)
  • Andrew James BOWER  (Conservative Party)
  • Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL  (Green Party)
  • Martin SMART  (Labour Party)
  • Tom WOODCOCK  (Cambridge Socialists)

Questions for Romsey division candidates (11 questions)

Jump to question:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11 

# Question 1

What experience do you have of cycling in the Cambridgeshire area?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

I cycle to work every day, from Romsey to Shire Hall and the business park.

When I left university I managed the ground operation of a small pedicab company in Cambridge called Greenwheels Pedicab Tours, which taught me a lot about the challenges of cycling here.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Cycling has been for many years my main mode of transport for commuting in Cambridge and further afield for leisure.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

My experience of cycling in Cambridgeshire is long and varied.

When I arrived in Cambridge 20 years ago I came with a nice red racing bike, although the frame was a little large for me! I enjoyed cycling around and exploring the new city that my partner and I had chosen to make our home.

Some time later I swapped my racer for a locally bought butchers bike which I used for shopping at Arjuna and other local shopping trips. Also, when we had twins in 1996 they used to love sitting in the banana box at the front for little trips over Parker's Piece and suchlike. A great bike for carrying all manner of loads! It was unfortunately stolen after a few years but luckily it turned up a week or so later, rather damaged, but I managed to get it renovated and it saw many more years of active service. By then the twins, or rather Anna and Jack, had their own little Raleighs with the all-important baskets for carrying essential teddies and so on.

Later, much later, I traded my butcher's in at a bike shop on King Street so my teenage son could have the second hand but never-the-less super-duper all-singing all-dancing 18 gear off-road thing in the window he desired! I missed the butchers bike and he all too soon grew out of his off-roader. However, things move on, and later I bought a second hand garage clear out job lot of bikes for the whole family. This was great fun and involved a small-wheeled home-made red tandem in welded square-section steel tubing. All the family, and friends too, enjoyed playing around with it on trips roundabout the local area. It also provided another cycling seat if we had more people that bikes. In that bunch of bikes we also had a Bickerton Portable, a great find. I've since restored it, though it's currently off the road with a broken peddle. There were also smaller bikes which the children used, and abused! The boy so enjoyed his bike that when I went to get it repaired the guy said he'd never seen a bike that was so damaged in so many ways! Not worth mending apparently, so I had another one made up out of spare bits for him. The girl got hers stolen, never to return, but then, she hadn't locked it up! For my part I got a rather rugged old Raleigh which I re-sprayed, got some repairs done, and finally added a huge trailer which I got for my birthday. I now go off down Mill Road, Snakey Path and over the railway bridge to Bookers to do large shopping trips, as well as the veg shopping and organic food still at Arjuna, as I did 20 years ago!

With the trailer off I cycle usually on a daily basis to wherever I'm going. Sometimes I get the bus, for example to meetings in Papworth for Disability Cambridgeshire, and occasionally I hire a car if we need on to do things as a family further afield . If it's just me I usually use the train but if it's all five of us it usually costs a lot more on the train or coach.

Just to say, this has all been rather utilitarian, and we have of course been off on recreational rides. For example, one lovely trip, when the children were younger, was when all five of us cycled up the river, out of town. We had decided to have an 'art trip' and stopped up toward Baits BIte Lock to do some pastel pictures. We were lucky enough to find a woodpecker and all had a lovely time drawing it as we tucked into a picnic lunch. What better thing could you do with a bike than a trip such as this?

This is a long and rambling answer to the question, and in fact I've cut out quite a bit, but that it the nature of a cycling life. The bike, or rather bikes, in our family, have been part of many of the stories of our lives living here together in Cambridge, and I hope will continue to be so in the future.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

I have grown up here and lived and worked in Cambridge nearly all my life. Cycling has always been my primary source of transport. I cycled to school in Cambridge every day and for leisure as a child.

Currently:
I cycle 4 miles each way to work every day.
I cycle my son to school just as I was ridden to school at his age.
I cycle for pleasure/sport and this has taken me out on many of the counties roads and cycle paths.

# Question 2

Cambridge is seeing massive housing growth, with tens of thousands of new journeys into the city expected daily. Given that building tunnels, knocking down houses, or providing new public transport is very expensive, would you agree that creating very high-quality cycling routes to encourage new people to cycle offers by far the best cost-benefit ratio for transport improvements that facilitate growth of the City and surrounding areas?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. Building world-class cycleways costs about the same amount of money as building a short road, so investing in cycling is a no-brainer, especially in congested urban areas. I would like to see all major developments include world-class cycling links to the existing cycle route network and centres of employment. Retro-fitting existing roads with better cycling provision is costly and inevitably a compromise. By putting dedicated cycle links at the heart of new developments we can build communities around sustainable transport.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Very high quality cycling routes must be standard for new developments. However, this can and should also be the case for public transport. Elsewhere, secure cycle parking and high quality carriageway surfaces must surely be the most efficient ways of keeping existing corridors open for cycling.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

High quality cycling routes are a vital as part of a good transport network based on travel to work distance (the maximum distance someone will bike to work or leisure) and need to be accompanied by good provision for pedestrians and a good public transport network.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

Yes, but further to this we need to actively stop unnecessary freight and car journeys into the city.

# Question 3

Do you support our view that traffic policing, of all groups of road users (cyclists, drivers, etc), should become a greater police priority, and that this should be evidence-based, namely based on the relative levels of danger presented by each such group?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. Although there is rarely clear agreement about evidence (different people interpret the same evidence differently, or point to different evidence) we should not lose sight of the fact that being hit by a ton of metal is as a rule more inconvenient than being hit by a cyclist travelling at the same speed.

I prefer an educative approach to the policing of cycling: the scheme that involved cyclists with no lights being issued with a fine that could be redeemed by purchasing a set of lights was excellent. Ultimately though policing is reactive and will never deliver the kind of improvement that we need to see on its own.

To achieve this we need a change of approach from County highways, so that roads are not primarily treated as through-routes for traffic, with the main goal being to “maximise throughput”; this reinforces the impression that roads belong to motorists and that cyclists are intruding on their space. Major investment in twenty-first century infrastructure is needed to change behaviour.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I am delighted that the new Conservative police and crime commissioner has already made increased enforcement of road safety offences by ALL road users (not just cyclists, as the report above to which you linked may lead people to believe).

I campaigned for proper police enforcement of speeding on problem roads in this area, including holding police officers to account at the council’s East Area Committee. I persuaded my colleague who was Conservative councillor to get police enforcement of speeding made a priority in our area, which was eventually successful despite being opposed by councillors from different parties all along the way.

One of the advantages of using police to enforce speed limits is that they can also tackle other motoring and cycling offences at the same time. However, the benefits of this approach have been undermined by the incremental city-wide 20 mph plans, which attract derision for being excessively broad.

http://cherryhintonroad.blogspot.com/2009/05/surprise-victory-on-policing-speeding.html

I organised a survey of bicycles on Mill Road over a couple of nights to gauge the extent of the problem of cycling without lights and found that 50% of lights were missing. I achieved some publicity as a result of this survey and consequently found police paying attention to the problem. It is important that policing of cycling is not just confined to a token annual check on Sidney Street.

http://cherryhintonroad.blogspot.com/2009/10/bicycle-lights-on-mill-road.html

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Home/Half-of-cyclists-snub-law-on-lights.htm

http://cherryhintonroad.blogspot.com/2009/11/police-respond-to-unlit-cyclists-on.html

We should be trying to increase the total amount of policing by cutting out police bureaucracy, doing more patrols individual rather than in pairs.

Cycle offences such as riding in the dark without lights and using pedestrian-only pavements, which intimidates pedestrians, should be taken more seriously. I think the prevalence of shared-use footpaths as part of a box-ticking culture towards cycling provision has created uncertainty and led many to assume that cycling on footpaths is always permitted.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Enforcement action by the police is most effective when accompanied by education and other measures to ensure good behaviour by all road users including cyclists and drivers.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

With the current cycling provision so inadequate I would argue to prioritize funding for making cycling safer, and eliminating dangers for all road users, above policing road users.

However I agree with the tone and intention of the cycling campaigns position paper.

# Question 4

London’s Mayor has launched plans for proper prioritisation of space for cycling in London, with a 15-mile substantially-segregated route by removing traffic lanes from cars, three ‘mini-Hollands’ and more. Do you and your party support a new London-style bike plan for Cambridgeshire?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

In principle, yes. However, I would like the Cycling Campaign flesh out these proposals, so that I can see more concretely what they would look like in practice. The one practical difficulty that occurs to me is that this might require the removal of bus priority measures, which would be a problem – we need to support sustainable transport more generally.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I am delighted that Boris Johnson is doing this in London and am very pleased with the cycleway that the county council introduced along the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway route.

I would be interested in any comparable proposals.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

We support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan, including learning from Dutch towns and country cycling and radical thinking, given similar needs and flat topography in Cambridgeshire.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

I support many of the cycling measures introduced in London. However the journey toward making London a more integrated and cycle friendly transport city started before Boris Johnson. The congestion charge, which I am opposed too because if let those who have more money drive where they want, opened the way to giving cyclist more room on the road and encouraging a critical mass of cyclists. Further to this serious investment in bus infrastructure and oyster card technology, mostly by Ken Livingstone independent administration, has given people better public transport alternatives and taken more traffic off the roads.

There is a Long way to go in London and public transport is still too expensive. The bike scheme is a massive step forward but has still got a way to go for occasional uses to find it really accessible.

In Cambridge the county council need to stop letting stage coach do what the y want. Bus Routes are dictated by big business and major retailers and not in a integrated strategy. The city councils move to introduce the CBID plays further into the hands of the big companies and both councils need to take back decision making and start to plan and fight for investment in a regional transport strategy that stops the centres of our towns being gridlocked and takes traffic away from them and stops more journeys being started.

I am in favor of banning all private vehicles (other than residents and disabled badge holders) being stopped from entering the Cambridge inner ring road. Im also in favor of taking the buses back into public ownership and getting them to go when and where we need them!!

# Question 5

The County Council now has responsibility for public heath. As a member of the Council, how would you address such urgent and diverse issues as air quality, obesity, children’s independence, and the negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

This rather leading question makes the point well that cycling should be at the centre of the County’s approach to tackling its new public health responsibilities.

The County needs to use its influence to promote cycling to children in schools early on. More investment is also needed to ensure that cycling here is safe for children and teenagers, not just experts.

In the Liberal Democrats’ alternative budget proposals we proposed to invest an extra £8M in cycle links around the county, starting with the Chisholm Trail.

In terms of air quality we propose to encourage a gradual switch to zero-emissions delivery vehicles in Cambridge city centre, with the eventual goal being for all deliveries to be made to a hub on the fringes of the city, with the last mile being completed by cargo bike or electric vehicles.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Of course there is a connection and this will influence policy across council areas but it seems ever so slightly opportunistic and manipulative for every interest group to tie its campaigns to health issues. I would rather address cycling needs openly via transport policy. However, I would seek to support continued private sector-provided cycle training.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Cycling and walking have an important role in any public health agenda both in their own right and also in accessing other sporting and leisure opportunities. Cycling or walking to school is very beneficial for children and the County Council can play a key role in safer Routes to School, providing sufficient bike shelters on sites and supporting programmes to help primary aged children learn to ride safely on the roads as well as learn simple bike maintenance. Monitoring air quality and reducing emissions in the central areas as well as on radial routes is important.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

Air Quality:
See above answers

Obesity:
Pay council workers properly and lobby for better pay for all workers
Enforce food standard
reward employers who commit to work life balance schemes and who join cycle to work scenes and encourage staff to leave work to participate in activities.
A broader school curriculum (including more cycle training).
Heath eating and a positive school dinners campaign (publicly run school and hospital catering).
Continue to campaign to remove fizzy drinks machines and fast food from schools, hospitals and leisure facilities.
(the City Council also needs to take back leisure services so you can actually get something health to eat at the swimming pool!)

Children's Independence:
Continue to campaign to stop Gove and all of the ConDem Governments utterly damaging test driven, narrow curriculum reforms that prioritize rote learning over active engaged and creative learning. Stop the acadamisation/privatization of our schools. Extend the Early Years Foundation to 7 years old. Campaign for larger classrooms and smaller class sizes. Camping for better outdoor facilities.

negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle:
I don't agree with the way this is phrased. Leisure is a luxury commodity in the no-liberal world we currently inhabit. Many cant afford to access decent activities or facilities, many have been closed. Also many people work too hard and have little time. Many people cant afford or don't have the time to access and source healthy food.

I hope you get my gist from the other answers above that as opposed to blaming poor people i think we should crack down on the multinational, profit hungry, socially irresponsible, tax dodging, parasitic, horse butchering conglomerates that run things!

# Question 6

Do you believe that Dutch-quality cycle provision, with cycle tracks that are separate both from pedestrians and motor traffic and that have priority over side roads, should a) be included within all new traffic schemes and b) be considered and consulted on for all modifications to existing schemes?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, where this is practically possible.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Certainly considered for both new and modified schemes but bear in mind that this is the opposite concept to 'shared space', which also has merit, so no, not mandatory for all new schemes.

In my opinion the biggest threat to Romsey cyclists' safety is vehicles entering Mill Road in Petersfield from side roads without looking properly.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Wherever possible given road layouts and the constraints of some very narrow cambridge roads. If 20 mph is applied across the City there will also need to be some re-engineering of roads to make it work.  

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

yes

# Question 7

What would your aspirations be for the County and its Cycling Champion to achieve in the next four-year Cabinet?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

The council’s current political leadership denies that such a thing as a “strategic cycle route” can exist and this needs to change. I would want the Council as a whole to understand that investing in cycling is not merely about cycling per se: it is about maintaining quality of life, taking care of our environment, making it easier to get around, and supporting our economy.

Our knowledge economy depends centrally on quality of life here being maintained and the County needs to make the case to central government that for the specific form of economic growth that we are seeing here to be sustained we need major investment in cycling. Otherwise the city will become gridlocked with congestion and air quality will deteriorate. People and businesses will go elsewhere.

In terms of specific projects, my top priority would be to deliver as much of the Chisholm Trail as possible. Our alternative budget proposals set aside £4M to deliver key sections of it.

I would also like to see a major review of junctions that are dangerous for cyclists.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I suggest three key targets, though much else ought to be done, too:

1. High quality provision in new developments and redevelopments.

2. Ongoing road maintenance programme ensuring quality cycling surfaces.

3. Elimination of the worst stop-start cycle facilities.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

To work with residents and communities to put into place high quality cycling routes wherever possible.     

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

1) To win funding for proper dutch style cycle routes to and around all new development.
2) To win funding fro the the Chisholm trail
3) To make Chesterton Station and Cambridge station Cycle friendly (as well as all the trains)
4) To get the Cambridge inner ring road to be cycle prioritized

# Question 8

Do you agree that pavement car parking, being illegal and inconsiderate, treats pedestrians as if they are second-class citizens? If so, do you feel that legalised pavement car parking, which has the exact same outcome as illegal pavement parking, is something problematic which should ideally be avoided?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

In an ideal world, yes, but in reality Romsey Town was mostly built in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when very few people had private motor cars, and as a result there is next to no off-street parking provision and we have one of the lowest amounts of parking per house in the entire city. This must be taken into account.

What I certainly do support is investigating whether banning pavement parking on Mill Road would be practical: this would in my view help to create a less hostile environment for cyclists and pedestrians on the main thoroughfare in our area.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Yes; yes.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Yes except where it has been put in following consultation with residents and in response to local conditions. Both pavement and verge parking should be avoided. Cambridgeshire should make more use of the TRO powers to prohibit these and improve our roads.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

Yes.

# Question 9

Currently most streets in terraced areas have no cycle parking but up to 100 cars per street. There is clear demand for cycle parking, in the form of cycles parked insecurely against houses, cycles locked to drainpipes near pubs, and notices in nearby houses not to park cycles. Do you think the current balance of cycle parking (0 cycles vs 100 cars) is a fair balance, and would you support the conversion of one car space per year on each street to secure cycle parking?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

A local couple who have children and use a cargo bike as their sole mode of transport recently approached me to ask if they could have a cycle parking bay introduced, because they cannot get their bike around the back of their house to lock up. This for me was a no-brainer and I said yes.

However, the question as posed here does not take account of the issues in the round. Romsey's Victorian terraces have no off-street car parking and consequently there is a very low number of parking spaces available per house (about 0.6 spaces per house is my estimate) – among the lowest levels citywide. In effect, Romsey’s incredibly limited parking availability is already aggressively regulating car ownership in the area, because it makes getting a parking space so difficult.

It is also worth mentioning that I have lived in several houses around Romsey and would never have locked up my bike on the terraces overnight, because the risk of theft is so great, even when it is attached to a rack. Most cyclists I have spoken to (many of whom also own cars) prefer to lock their bikes up off-street, normally in their back garden.

So for me the immediate priority with the very limited funds available should be to provide more cycle parking in places where there is most demand, near shops and pubs, for example.

In the longer term, the key project to reducing car-ownership here in Romsey is the Chisholm Trail cycle route. If good links are provided to it from the Mill Road railway bridge this would enable huge numbers of Romsey residents, who are not confident enough to cycle through Hyde Park Corner or the Newmarket Road roundabout, to cycle to the Science Park and Addenbrooke’s by bicycle.

We hope that the new railway station will reduce commuter parking here, and the local car-sharing club is also driving down car ownership, so over time it may well be possible to introduce more cycle parking on the terraces, but for the time being I would focus on providing it near shops, pubs and on the high street.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

As someone who has suffered 7 cycle thefts and the theft of various cycle accessories I understand the importance of this point.
I am going to avoid the language of “fair” as this perpetuates the damaging confrontational attitude between some of the more zealous of road user-advocates, but I do support this change. While there would need to be some form of gradual change to allow people to adjust to the loss of vehicle parking I would prefer in principle a proper up-front programme of conversion to a 'stealth' programme of incremental conversion.

This may also be an option for verges that are otherwise abused for vehicle parking, space that does not detract from the carriageway or pavement width.

I would like to see more rigorous enforcement by city council planners of our minimum cycle parking standards for developments.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

We support the selective conversion if residents agree following consultation particularly in narrow city streets. 

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

yes (but this is too slow)

# Question 10

Do you support our proposal for 'The Chisholm Trail', a cycling and walking linear park that would run roughly along the railway, joining up the Science Park to Addenbrookes? More details are in our Cycling Vision 2016 document. This high-profile scheme would cut journey times, give people a genuine, realistic alternative to car use and help the city cope with the population increase which will take place in the coming years.

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the Chisholm Trail and in the last four years have done my best to hurry up the delivery of this project, including moving a motion to the County Council: http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/CMSWebsite/Apps/Committees/AgendaItem.aspx?agendaItemID=5126

I also wrote a short blog about the trail last year: http://kilianbourke.mycouncillor.org.uk/2012/09/06/the-woods-the-trees-and-the-chisholm-trail/

Our manifesto contains a commitment to invest in delivering key sections of it that are of standalone value quickly, and our alternative budget provides £4M for this purpose (and another £4M for cycling).

To my surprise, in launching their County manifesto Labour’s group leader stated that he was opposed to the £8M investment that we propose to make. You can’t credibly support the Chisholm Trail and oppose investing on it.

If you want to access the detail of this discussion click on the link on the following web-page: http://kilianbourke.mycouncillor.org.uk/?attachment_id=1097

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I do support the Chisholm Trail and would do what I could to get rail companies and any other relevant bodies to facilitate the scheme.

The Conservative-controlled county council is open to the idea of the trail and Cambridge Conservatives have supported it for many years.

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

City and County Labour Groups both support the Chisholm Trail. This cycle and pedestrian route would provide a real alternative to the car and be a crucial factor in the success of developments such as the Wing site on Newmarket road. It will be very important to identify and address any concerns and ensure that environmentally sensitive areas such as Stourbridge Common and Ditton Meadows are recognised and protected. The Trail needs a clear plan and staged implementation which can go out for full consultation with local communities as well as businesses and likely users.  I want to see the first stages funded and implemented, rather than wait.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

yes

# Question 11

Do you have any other general cycling-related comments or points? And what support have you given for cycling and walking, or sustainable transport more generally, in the recent past?

Marjorie Ruth BARR
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

The main point I want to make is that cycling is integral to the continued success of our area, not a niche interest. It makes it easier to get around and reduces congestion and parking problems, benefiting the economy; it improves air quality and public health; and it is an extremely cost-efficient investment. We need to persuade the County that, rather than being a single issue or decorative extra that affects a few people, it is central to achieving the County’s aims.

One small improvement I have managed to get done locally has been to have our dangerous roadside drains on Mill Road replaced with seamless cycle friendly ones, which you can see here: http://kilianbourke.mycouncillor.org.uk/?attachment_id=1092 A small detail, but a big improvement!

Recently I lobbied the County to improve provision for cyclists on Perne Road junction, which is on the strategic cycle route that runs through Romsey to the railway station. You can see the plans by clicking on the link contained here: http://kilianbourke.mycouncillor.org.uk/?attachment_id=1096
This scheme will include improving the detection loop on the traffic lights at Burnside, which currently does not detect cyclists.

More generally Cambridgeshire Liberal Democrats are passionately committed to sustainable transport and propose to build a rail link to Wisbech, to stop the Conservative cuts to our bus services, and to provide free public transport for the roughly 1,000 young people in our area who are out of education, training and employment.

If you have any questions please email me at kilian.bourke@gmail.com

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I joined the Cambridge Cycling Campaign recently, particularly to support its stance against the creeping de-legitimisation of those who chose to cycle without helmets or high-visibility clothing.

I have promoted cycling with lights, defensive cycling, the need to open up what I call value-added cycle paths (not the same as a splash of white paint on the road/pavement) which open up new options for cyclists, adequately sized cycle lanes (many in the city are not) and have campaigned to get speeding vehicles under control.

I oppose road measures that make life more difficult for cyclists, such as road humps. I have been sceptical of the culture in government of painting white lines on the road or sharing pavements and calling that a cycling facility. Cyclists need to feel confident cycling on the main highway, through promotion, law enforcement and training.

Here are some notes about commuter cycling in Cambridge that I wrote previously:

http://cherryhintonroad.blogspot.com/2010/09/commuter-cycling-in-cambridge.html

Hywel Francis Taylor SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)
The candidate has not responded to the survey.
Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Happy to work with the campaign locally and citywide on further initiatives and opportunities

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

I support the Cycle campaign as a member for the last 10 years.
I have raised the campaigns aims through the trade union movement and affiliated my NUT branch.
Have lobbied for safer junctions, cycle priorities and reduced speed limits as part of my role as a ward candidate.
Have developed cycle Campaign materials in my work and promoted cycling to students.
Have been involved in several bus users campaigns and recently in the action for rail campaign.
Regularly contribute to planning and local plan consultations.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.