Elections

« Back to list of all 35 questions for this election

Question 5 - we asked:

The County Council now has responsibility for public heath. As a member of the Council, how would you address such urgent and diverse issues as air quality, obesity, children’s independence, and the negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle?

We asked this question in these 25 divisions: Arbury, Bar Hill, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, Cottenham, Histon and Impington, Fulbourn, Gamlingay, Hardwick, King's Hedges, Market, Melbourn, Newnham, Norman Cross, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Roman Bank and Peckover, Romsey, Sawston, The Hemingfords and Fenstanton, Trumpington, Waterbeach, West Chesterton, Whittlesey North, Willingham.

72 of the 119 candidates (61%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Those candidate(s) which were elected are highlighted.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

Air Quality:
See above answers

Obesity:
Pay council workers properly and lobby for better pay for all workers
Enforce food standard
reward employers who commit to work life balance schemes and who join cycle to work scenes and encourage staff to leave work to participate in activities.
A broader school curriculum (including more cycle training).
Heath eating and a positive school dinners campaign (publicly run school and hospital catering).
Continue to campaign to remove fizzy drinks machines and fast food from schools, hospitals and leisure facilities.
(the City Council also needs to take back leisure services so you can actually get something health to eat at the swimming pool!)

Children's Independence:
Continue to campaign to stop Gove and all of the ConDem Governments utterly damaging test driven, narrow curriculum reforms that prioritize rote learning over active engaged and creative learning. Stop the acadamisation/privatization of our schools. Extend the Early Years Foundation to 7 years old. Campaign for larger classrooms and smaller class sizes. Camping for better outdoor facilities.

negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle:
I don't agree with the way this is phrased. Leisure is a luxury commodity in the no-liberal world we currently inhabit. Many cant afford to access decent activities or facilities, many have been closed. Also many people work too hard and have little time. Many people cant afford or don't have the time to access and source healthy food.

I hope you get my gist from the other answers above that as opposed to blaming poor people i think we should crack down on the multinational, profit hungry, socially irresponsible, tax dodging, parasitic, horse butchering conglomerates that run things!

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

Of course there is a connection and this will influence policy across council areas but it seems ever so slightly opportunistic and manipulative for every interest group to tie its campaigns to health issues. I would rather address cycling needs openly via transport policy. However, I would seek to support continued private sector-provided cycle training.

Martin John CURTIS
(Conservative Party)

The Council have cycling as a key legacy project post Olympics, cycling has to be a key part of developing a healthy lifestyle, but we need to focus on other benefits of cycling too, such as what a great family activity it is.

Timothy James HAIRE
(Conservative Party)

Health is very important but I think in a place like Cambridge cycling should primarily be viewed as a transport infrastructure issue.

John Michael IONIDES
(Conservative Party)

The County has a major role in strategic planning. In recent years there has been a lot of support for adding additional housing to the fringes on Cambridge, the argument being that this is more "sustainable" because people can then cycle to work.

My experience both in South Cambs and in Cambridge leads me to believe this model is misguided. For instance, the effect of land values and target housing densities means that many developments in Trumpington do not have easy access to open space where children can play freely (take a look at Accorda and Kaleidoscope). On the other hand. I think that places like Cambourne promote active lifestyles and independence in children far better.

Therefore, I would promote a strategic shift away from expanding Cambridge itself towards providing housing along transport corridors (e.g. Northstowe, Waterbeach). This would have the added benefit of protecting the Green Belt around the city.

This is a view endorsed by CPPF's draft '2030 Vision' document which has drawn input from a wide range of bodies within Cambridge, and I hope it is a position that the Cycling Campaign can support.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Driving down emissions and keeping Cambridge moving must be a priority as the city expands. The Science Park cycle link would enable many to use the railway and bicycle to commute and link city youngsters to Milton Country Park. When it comes to kids' independence, obesity and sedentary lifestyles, i believe that these issues are led by socioeconomic conditions that need to be addressed at a national level.

Sheila LAWLOR
(Conservative Party)

The issues you raise in the question leave me in no doubt that more cycling would be beneficial to public health. But in order to encourage it, and encourage other active pursuits, we need to make the city an activity-friendly place. And that means protecting our green spaces and making the roads cycle- and pedestrian-friendly. Of course, issues like obesity and the wish for children to have more independence cannot be solved by council cycling schemes alone - but it is a good start.

Tony ORGEE
(Conservative Party)

National governments have been concerned about the nation's health for some years, childhood obesity being one example of a specific concern. Obviously many issues are linked: diet, lifestyle (sedentary or more active), air quality and so on. Councils are active in promoting healthy eating, encouraging people to take up / engage in more sporting activities, encouraging people to be more active, promoting safer routes to school to encourage non-car means of travelling to school, and so on.

James Andrew STRACHAN
(Conservative Party)

people must make up their own minds. It would take more than my efforts to get a couch potato off the couch.

Steve TIERNEY
(Conservative Party)

I think the answer to your interesting question requires an essay, or several. But in short, I believe that good advice, good support and provision for all sorts of healthy activity - ie prevention - is a very good place to start. And yes, cycling is a part of that of course. But we should be working with and helping people, not trying to dictate to them how to boss them around. We are here to serve and support, not to dictate people's personal choices.

Timothy John WOTHERSPOON
(Conservative Party)

I like the shift in attitude from the dangers of cycling to the dangers of non-cycling! I'm very much in favour of increasing activity levels for people of all ages in all aspects of day to day living (rather than having to take exercise for its own sake).

Sandra BILLINGTON
(Green Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Eleanor Ruth CRANE
(Green Party)

Promoting sustainable and active forms of transport clearly has a role to play in tackling all of these issues.

The Green Party believes in a much stronger emphasis on prevention of ill health via living healthier lives. We need to encourage healthier eating, more exercise, a lower-stress, slower-living society, a serious reduction in environmental pollutants, and greater access to tranquil countryside.

I would support initiatives that increase the tranquillity of our built environment, including provision and maintenance of high-quality green space within walking distance of where people live, and 20mph zones in residential areas and around schools. I would also look to increase the provision of free school meals for children in our County, and work to increase the quality of school meals through promoting the Food for Life partnership (http://www.foodforlife.org.uk).

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)

This question is a bit broad but Green Party policies address these issues and consider them to be primary concerns.

Stephen Roger LAWRENCE
(Green Party)

Refer to local party statement (see Simon Sedgwick-Jell)

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)

Increased numbers of children cycling would clearly help to address all these issues. Improved infrastructure is vital for parents to feel their children are safe on a bike. I think it is important that any development plans for the transport system look at knock-on consequences for issues such as public health and the environment.

Teal RILEY
(Green Party)

This is the Green Party response from the national manifesto:
• The Green Party believes in a much stronger emphasis on prevention of ill health, via living healthier lives and greater equality. This shows how, unlike other parties, our policies are woven together into a coherent whole.
• We cannot have an effective preventive approach, and thus a long-term-thinking ‘health’ service, unless we encourage healthier eating, more exercise, a lower-stress, slower-living society, a serious reduction in environmental pollutants, and greater access to tranquil countryside.
• And we recognise the connection between mental and physical well-being.
• Better health is not a matter of ever-increasing spending on the NHS. A surer route, which can’t be disrupted by the need to bail out bankers, is to support simple things like good food, less competition and less stress.
• Improve food skills by encouraging schools to involve children in growing, preparing and cooking food.
• Increase the tranquillity of our urban environments, with less litter, less noise, reduced light pollution and more green spaces. Everyone should live within walking distance of natural green space.
• Provide a full half day a week of inviting physical activity for every child, and at least one day a year learning in the natural environment.
• Provide free school meals for all – with locally sourced or fair-trade and (where possible) organic food, and with a vegetarian option. This will encourage healthy eating, combat obesity, improve concentration and end the stigma associated with free school meals. There can be few better ways of spending up to £2bn a year, only a fraction of the amount spent on bonuses in the city.

Simon David Francis SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)

Safer cycle routes. Stick rather than carrot approach to car/lorry use.

David SMITH
(Green Party)

This is a very big question, and demands more space than is available here. One of the best routes to good health is regular exercise, embedded in a child from an early age. There should be real incentives to encourage children to cycle to school (perhaps in groups, with an adult 'minder' ) and, by punitive parking charges and other disincentives, to persuade adults to make the cycle their first choice for all local journeys and to leave the car at home.

Helen STOCKS
(Green Party)

We cannot have a long term solution to public health without looking at healthy eating, more active lifestyles, lower stress levels and less pollution. In order to do this I will try and implement the following
- encourage more cycling, walking and sport by providing space which is safe
- bike to work scheme
- cycle proficiency training for adults and children
- better public transport and cycle routes to reduce traffic
- improve food skills through education
- improve the living environment - less noise, less litter and more green spaces
- free school meals using local, healthy food

Linda WHITEBREAD
(Green Party)

I'm tempted to paraphrase Norman Tebbit, and suggest that people get on their bike.

From the national manifesto:
• The Green Party believes in a much stronger emphasis on prevention of ill health, via living healthier lives and greater equality. This shows how, unlike other parties, our policies are woven together into a coherent whole.
• We cannot have an effective preventive approach, and thus a long-term-thinking ‘health’ service, unless we encourage healthier eating, more exercise, a lower-stress, slower-living society, a serious reduction in environmental pollutants, and greater access to tranquil countryside.
• And we recognise the connection between mental and physical well-being.
• Better health is not a matter of ever-increasing spending on the NHS. A surer route, which can’t be disrupted by the need to bail out bankers, is to support simple things like good food, less competition and less stress.
• Improve food skills by encouraging schools to involve children in growing, preparing and cooking food.
• Increase the tranquillity of our urban environments, with less litter, less noise, reduced light pollution and more green spaces. Everyone should live within walking distance of natural green space.
• Provide a full half day a week of inviting physical activity for every child, and at least one day a year learning in the natural environment.
• Provide free school meals for all – with locally sourced or fair-trade and (where possible) organic food, and with a vegetarian option. This will encourage healthy eating, combat obesity, improve concentration and end the stigma associated with free school meals. There can be few better ways of spending up to £2bn a year, only a fraction of the amount spent on bonuses in the city.

John HIPKIN
(Independent)

Get them cycling!

Ian TYES
(Independent)

As an independent I would have limited effect on changing any of these issues, hence my focus on transport in general and cycling in particular, as this has public health benefits as well as the other factors indicated. I used to cycle on my own from an early age and it did encourage my confidence and feelings of independence, which helped in later years. Making cycling easier to access, safer, off-road, direct and the logical choice would tackle these issues - but only with a joined up and integrated policy. Whilst you are clearly focused on the cycling approach to tackling the list of important issues mentioned, I would also be looking at motorbike, car, bus and rail changes to tackle these issues as well. Better signage on the M11, A14 and A11 would reduce driving in Cambridge and encourage people to go wound the city to get nearer to their destination, for example. An eastern link between A14 east and A11 south would complete the outer ring road. A park and ride site around 6 mile bottom directly on the under-used Ipswich rail line and close to A14/A11 would help. The Cambridge Science Park Station will reduce cross-city traffic. A local road alongside the A14 in the north of the city and closing junctions would improve cross-river congestion. Reducing right turns and changing phasing of lights to be controlled by traffic flow would improve congestion in the city. The crazy £32 million for an Ely southern bypass so that a few hgv's won't have to wait at the level crossing in Ely could be far better used on junction improvements throughout the area.

John Frederick BERESFORD
(Labour & Co-operative)

I was certainly fit when I cycled regularly to work. I would also encourage local children to walk or cycle to school - initiatives like pedestrian 'buses' should be encouraged. Bike shelter provision and school-based safe bicycling programmes should also be encouraged.

Edward CARLSSON BROWNE
(Labour Party)

First let me say that I support the Chisholm Trail and that I see every reason for an application for a Cycle City Ambition Grant to be made.

I don’t think cycling is going to be the major part of Cambridgeshire’s public health strategy, but it can certainly play a role, both in its own right and as a method of accessing other leisure and sporting opportunities. I’m in favour of improving bike parking at schools to make it easier for children to cycle there (to be honest, I’m in favour of improve bike parking full stop.) I support programmes to teach children to learn to ride safely and to perform basic cycle maintenance.

It’s definitely important that we don’t overstress the dangers of cycling, at the expense of forgetting its health benefits (and indeed the fact that it’s fun.) Improving the safety of cyclists on the road is important, but we should never forget that the vast majority of cycle journeys end without incident. I grew up cycling on rural roads, without cycle lanes, or indeed basic levels of co-ordination. I came through that unscathed and with the much better level of cycling infrastructure Cambridge has we shouldn’t be afraid to encourage people to cycle.

Sandra CRAWFORD
(Labour Party)

Cycling to work and school instead of driving is excellent for health, it is good exercise, and helps to prevent air pollution. If most people cycled or walked, there would be fewer cars and gridlock in the rush hours, and probably fewer accidents as a result.
The county Council therefore can play a key role in providing safe cycling infrastructure for Cambridgeshire. The provision of safe cycling courses for children and bicycle sheds in schools would be necessary.
Cycling infrastructure could make parents more confident in allowing their children to cycle to school instead of being driven by car.

Adam John DUTTON
(Labour Party)

Clearly that list of issues ties cycling's benefits together quite neatly. So of course cycling would play a part. However I would also expect that: car sharing initiatives (air quality), encouraging non sporting physical activities (obesity), improving green spaces and reconnecting children to nature (independence) amongst many other possibilities would form part of a more complete policy.

Adrian John FRENCH
(Labour Party)

Cycling provision plays an important part in many health related provisions.

Huw JONES
(Labour Party)

My personal priority is to encourage provision of Safe Routes to Schools for both cyclists and pedestrians. Ideally cycling or walking should be the natural choice for short journeys; habits learned at an early age can establish a healthier way of life

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

The County Council can have a vital role in encouraging people to be healthier by creating safer cycle and walking routes to schools. There should also be programmes that teach primary age children to cycle safely

Air quality in central areas can be improved by encouraging people to walk, cycle or use public transport rather than relying on their cars.

Ben MONKS
(Labour Party)

I'd advocate investment in social sporting activity aimed at young people in addition to organised "club" based sports. Cycling has a role to play in that. I'm also often amazed at how little is made of the open spaces in our area for leisure activities - people often don't realise what is on their doorstep. I want the County Council's public health strategy to have some focus on encouraging use of the network of byways, bridleways and footpaths across the county bringing in schools and existing clubs and groups in our communities.

Mike NETTLETON
(Labour Party)

You need a 20 page essay on this, but some ideas:
Air quality - reduce traffic, make vehicles on the road more fuel efficient (including buses)
Obesity - input and output, Cut crap food and increase exercise and cycling obviously has a part to play
Children's independence - my view is that parents now wrap their children up in cotton wool far too much.
Sedentary lifestyle - we're all guilty and need to take more activity

Fiona ONASANYA
(Labour Party)

Cycling and walking have an important role in any public health agenda; both in their own right and also in accessing other sporting and leisure opportunities. For example,
Cycling or walking to school is very beneficial for children. The County Council can play a key role in safer routes to School, providing sufficient bike shelters on sites and supporting programmes to help primary aged children learn to ride safely on the roads.

Angela Mary PATRICK
(Labour Party)

I agree with encouraging a healthy life style for all

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

The benefits of cycling are well known. Studies establish that cyclists have lower levels of obesity and have better general health than non-cyclists. As well as easing the strain on our over-used roads, cycling provides valuable health benefits. One area the County Council has responsibility for is education, and we should do more to encourage safe cycling for our children. My step-children always walk or bike to school, though they complain about cycle parking on site. I will campaign for better cycle parking at schools and for more provision of cycling proficiency courses. This improves the self-confidence of young people as well as their fitness.

Paul SALES
(Labour Party)

That’s a huge question to answer in brief and many health issues across the County are rooted in the inequality and deprivation that can be found in some Cambridge wards and in Fenland and East Cambs. Addressing child poverty would be a good start and under this government those levels are rising daily. But of course on a local level providing safe routes to school, ensuring children can learn how to ride bikes safely on roads and filling in potholes so they don’t come off then would be good.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

I would encourage cycling and walking to work and school, encourage greater provision for school cycling clubs and classes, and ensure air quality is properly monitored.I would also encourage the revival of school 'countryside clubs' to foster greater appreciation of nature, the countryside, and our native ecology.

Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

I am a strong believer in positive health care and preventative medicine. As to air quality, cycling and walking have an enormous part to play in lowering carbon levels and need to be supported both in the context of public health and climate change.

As to children's independence and obesity, good eating and exercise habits are best instilled during childhood. We need to focus on ways to ensure children are able to cycle and walk safely to school and to leisure and sport activities. Children and young people can be encouraged to cycle safely through cycling education (including bike maintenance) and provision of cycle shelters and adequate parking for cycles at schools, sporting and leisure facilities.

Parents' concern for their children's safety is understandable, and the County Council needs to address this by the above, and by supporting 'safe house' and 'neighbourhood watch' programmes along with safe cycleways and paths, and the necessary cycle sheds and parking facilities.

Improved provision for cycling generally and for walking, by better and more parking for cycles, road and footpath maintenance and signage, cycle paths and cycle ways - all under County Council responsibility, should work in with public health plans so as to address adult obesity and negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

Cycling and walking have an important role in any public health agenda both in their own right and also in accessing other sporting and leisure opportunities. Cycling or walking to school is very beneficial for children and the County Council can play a key role in safer Routes to School, providing sufficient bike shelters on sites and supporting programmes to help primary aged children learn to ride safely on the roads as well as learn simple bike maintenance. Monitoring air quality and reducing emissions in the central areas as well as on radial routes is important.

Peter SNOW
(Labour Party)

Cycling and walking have an important role in any public health agenda both in their own right and also in accessing other sporting and leisure opportunities.

Cycling or walking to school is very beneficial for children and the County Council can play a key role in safer Routes to School, providing sufficient bike shelters on sites and supporting programmes to help primary aged children learn to ride safely on the roads as well as learn simple bike maintenance.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

I would try to address such issues as air quality and congestion by supporting housing developments which minimise the need for cars, be they through proximity to urban centres or good cycling routes. Developments also need ample green-space provision. I have discussed such issues in recent leaflets in Petersfield as the City Council begins to lay out plans to move the Mill Road depot and potentially develop the site into housing.

The County Council is responsible both for public health and schools. The Council should seek wherever possible to provide safe walking routes to schools. For instance, parents in Petersfield continually worry about the safety of the junction between East Road and Mill Road for children walking either to St Matthew's Primary or to Parkside School. Schools - new and old - should have excellent bike shelter provision and the council should expand cycling proficiency lessons in primary schools, encouraging safety and responsibility on the road and good bike maintenance.

Important arterial roads should be regularly monitored for air quality and, whenever they are upgraded or altered, public health should be a top priority.

Barbara Anne ASHWOOD
(Liberal Democrat)

As a rhinitis sufferer who has also had asthma, I feel air quality needs to be monitored more stringently. The country has been trying to tackle obesity for some years with little result. Perhaps we should lead by example - my BMI is 19, not something that could be said by a number of our current County Councillors. The County Council could field a team in a Fun Run/cycle ride or similar, raising funds for local charities - people might think better of us if they saw us actively participating in the community! I would love to see children riding cycles with just their friends as company, but this can't be achieved while parents are so scared by lack of safe cycleways etc. When I was a kid, we'd spend whole days during the holidays off in a gang doing our own thing and come home filthy and exhausted - but our parents were never worried. We now seem to have gone to the opposite extreme where children are wrapped in cotton wool at birth and only released on leaving school. Kids CAN catch buses/walk to school, they don't have to be dropped off at the gates. The private schools in the south of Cambridge all run mini buses from the P&R, yet hundreds of Mums feel the need to sit in the traffic queues to deliver them personally - have they ever thought that a short walk might actually do them good? Changing sedentary lifestyles is also almost impossible with the ever increasing access to technology which actively encourages 'just sitting' - if games/home gym manufacturers could be persuaded to reduce prices, people might be more prepared to take exercise at home. Ultimately I feel the only way to tackle this may be through GPs surgeries, but this is usually after the damage has been done. We live in a society where we have freedom of choice as to how we live, and compulsion isn't an option - rationing treatment wouldn't make a difference because we all feel we have 'the right' to live as we please. Perhaps we need 'ordinary' people to try to get the message across because the cult of celebrity clearly isn't working.

William James BARTER
(Liberal Democrat)

It is clear that cycling has a major role to play in all the issues you list here. The Lib Dems want to extend the successful Bike Bank pilot scheme that gives young people free restored bikes and cycle training following a 6 week course that also gives an employment qualification. This would be done in partnership with secondary schools, youth clubs and 6th form colleges.

But we should not lose sight of other ways we can build upon the existing quality of life. For example, I fully support opening the local Chalk Pit lakes to the public if this can be done in a safe and sensitive way.

Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

This rather leading question makes the point well that cycling should be at the centre of the County’s approach to tackling its new public health responsibilities.

The County needs to use its influence to promote cycling to children in schools early on. More investment is also needed to ensure that cycling here is safe for children and teenagers, not just experts.

In the Liberal Democrats’ alternative budget proposals we proposed to invest an extra £8M in cycle links around the county, starting with the Chisholm Trail.

In terms of air quality we propose to encourage a gradual switch to zero-emissions delivery vehicles in Cambridge city centre, with the eventual goal being for all deliveries to be made to a hub on the fringes of the city, with the last mile being completed by cargo bike or electric vehicles.

Belinda Margaret BROOKS-GORDON
(Liberal Democrat)

As a Green Liberal Democrat I care about air quality and public health. I have particular concerns about particulate matter, on which there is a national objective below which there is no safe level. I would like to see better and more air-quality monitoring.

Cycling improves health and doesn't harm the environment. I would like to see a return to the school cycling proficiency test being free for all, and bicycles loaned to children who can't afford them so that they could pass the test.

Edward CEARNS
(Liberal Democrat)

I would encourage more cycling- there are a number of proposals that we have put in our County election manifesto, including bike banks (free bikes and training for young people), the Chisholm Trail, which would link Addenbrooke's hospital directly to the Science Park and the new railway station.

I would encourage both County and City councils to work more closely together to deliver air quality improvements to Cambridge, including the phasing out of the most polluting older generation buses.

In addition I would lobby for investment in youth and community centres and development workers and schemes such as the “Dec” young peoples bus that travels around Cambridge.

Keith EDKINS
(Liberal Democrat)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Peter Robert FANE
(Liberal Democrat)

I have always seen cycling and walking as important to improving health, as with the ‘Walking the Way to Health’ campaign we started in the former Countryside Agency , of which I was a board member in the early noughties, an approach which I have supported since whenever the opportunity arises. See http://www.nationalrural.org/organisation.aspx?id=66230418-77fb-4ed3-879b-c26409492a0f. National cycle routes should also be supported (see http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/countryside-agency-funding-points-the-way-on-new-pennine-cyclewa/03826 ). Safer cycling is also an important aspect of helping children to develop independence.

David Aubertin GRACE
(Liberal Democrat)

Health, environmental and public transport considerations combine to justify our plans (see question 4). We need to explore every funding opportunity to develop them. The all-party parliamentary cycling group (APPCG) chaired by Julian Huppert has just published its excellent report on cycling. As Head of European Affairs at East Sussex County Council over ten years ago, I worked with Councillor Norman Baker on environmental matters. Norman is now junior transport minister and I will be lobbying him and his colleagues to implement the report. I will push for the county to apply for new funds from government as they become available.

Sue GYMER
(Liberal Democrat)

Air quality is often overlooked and complex. I feel SCDC is not doing enough to ensure the planning it approves doesn't negatively affect a community. Children who discover cycling are the most independent. It should be encouraged but we should be mindful of those who aren't rich enough, physically able or confident to cycle.
Health issues due to a sedentary life style and obesity do cost the public purse so prevention and sympathetic help should be seen as a good way to head off this ticking time bomb.
But not all are as fit and healthy as the next person nor will using a bike be a panacea. It does take my lycra clad husband about the same time to cycle to work as it does for us to drive but _I_ would take twice as long.

John David JENKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

1 by example
2 by continuing to lobby that such factors should always be considered in whatever the Council does
3 by consulting and ensuring that residents' views on them are always considered,

Michael Thomas KILPATRICK
(Liberal Democrat)

If it were in my power I would mandate larger gardens for new developments in order to create more space for children to play. Any garden which is not large enough for a young child to ride a bicycle round in a circle is not fit for purpose. How can children safely learn to cycle?

To imprive air quality I would wish to ecnourage safer walking and cycling. Better footpaths and cycle paths. Wider pavements by default to allow parents to feel that their children are safer. Grass verges should separate pavements from the roadway to give an added safety zone so that children do not have to be so much prevented from prancing about, as they often do when walking along the pavement. I prefer to see better on-road cycle facilities where practicable rather than an excess of separate cycle paths.

Sebastian Gerald Molesworth KINDERSLEY
(Liberal Democrat)

I'm not sure I'm qualified to answer this! The obvious answer - from the Cambridge Cycling Campaign point of view - is to make cycling the safest and most popular transport mode for all rather than just a (growing) few. Just please don't forget that for some people cycling 18 miles into town and back to Gamlingay with two major hills in the way just is not feasible! But it could be from many of the slightly further-out villages with just a little cash and a lot of removing barriers (almost all of them physical).

Maurice Leonard LEEKE
(Liberal Democrat)

Cycling can help with the diverse issues you mention, and I would welcome and support an increase in cycling. There are people for whom cycling is not a possibility, however.

Daniel Stephen LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

As well as investing in cycle routes, I would seek to protect and improve public transport, provide outdoor play areas and sports facilities for children and invest in green energy and spaces.

Robert MCLAREN
(Liberal Democrat)

We need to promote sport for all again,we need to make sport trendy and fashionable.
We already as a party support,youth clubs.
Wheelchair basket ball .Disabled still need help in accessing sport,some i know feel that if they take part in sport they will lose their benefits,this should not be the case.It is harder to keep a healthy lifestyle when you are disabled.We all know air quality is important,it should always be monitored,and corrected where poor asap.Childrens independence is very important,it is all ready being addressed very well by my party.The effects of a sedentary lifestyle would be addressed also by light physical activity,and then build from there.

Lucy Kathleen NETHSINGHA
(Liberal Democrat)

I think the ability of children and young people in Cambridge to cycle around their city is a wonderful benefit of living here. The freedom it allows children and parents to live independent lives is just as important as the health benefits, although these are clearly huge.

Andy PELLEW
(Liberal Democrat)

Clearly encouraging young people to cycle will not only help with the four issues you've highlighted but also help to reduce congestion outside schools, and traffic volumnes generally.

However there are a great number of health issues which need to be addressed and its not clear to me how these should be prioritied so that the limited amount of money available can be spent in such a way as to have the most impact - If elected I'll be relying on evidence and experts to help me reach an appropriate decision.

Barry John PLATT
(Liberal Democrat)

There are many factors that lead to a healthier lifestyle including better quality food, more sustainable energy production, building safe spaces for children and facilitating healthier activities including – of course – cycling. I believe that it is important to do what we can in all these areas while recognising that no one factor is the solution to all our public health problems.

David John PRIESTMAN
(Liberal Democrat)

Air quality isn't something that Cambridgeshire CC alone can have a significant effect on, as it relies on national & intternatiuonal regulation of emmissions and pollutants. We should consider setting a goal of hybrid and low-Co2 vehicle only access to our urban centres in the future - say 2025.
Regarding exercise, CCC cannot regulate food standards but should encourage schools & health professionals to hammer-home the message that general fitness is a pre-requisite to a long and happy life.

Amanda Joan TAYLOR
(Liberal Democrat)

It's important to get children cycling young for both the reasons you mention. The Lib Dems would invest in the Bike Banks scheme, which gives young people courses in bike maintenances as well as a free bike. This would complement Bikeability. I would like to see more support for cycle training, to ensure children learn good, safe cycling habits.

Air quality can be improved by having 'green vehicles' (like the City Centre shuttle) and this is where the County can take the lead. We also need to encourage the bus companies to use modern vehicles that are less polluting, and to discourage them from leaving engines running.

Retaining rural buses would be one way in which the Council could encourage independence!

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Partly, I'd push for the real 'externality costs' to be factored in. I'm on the LibDem Tax Policy Working Group for the LibDems nationally, and pushing for economic reform (also via the Systemic Fiscal Reform think tank) to better align what is common sense to a child (e.g. tax unwanted behaviour and take tax off wanted behaviour - doh!), with what is policy going into the next general election.

Susan Elizabeth Kerr VAN DE VEN
(Liberal Democrat)

Transport is inextricably linked into the public health agenda and indeed is a priority within the County Council's Health and Well Being Strategy. This needs to include public transport and lifeline transport, but also cycling for that large sector of the population which has the potential to benefit from it. As a member of the council I would support this.
There's a large amount of work that can be done by councillors at the local level in terms of encouraging walking and cycling. Through the Meldreth, Shepreth and Foxton Rail User Group I have supported better cycling provision for rail users, including fair cycles-on-trains policies negotiated with the train operator for our stations; and also work with local primary schools and playgroups, Melbourn Village College students, Young People out of Education, Employment and Training, Duke of Edinburgh volunteers, and village gardening clubs, on various sustainability themes - we have established flower and vegetable gardens, sustainable watering systems and wildlife habitats at each of our three local rail stations. With this project comes an implicit encouragement to use the sustainable transport network on our doorstep. So more community projects that reach ground level and encourage changes in lifestyle, in combination with supportive council policies. As a county councillor I have worked with officers to help get Bikeability rolled out to schools county-wide, and also to set up the first 'Bike Bank' project, piloted in Melbourn - a bicycle maintenance course for young people, to gain employable skills and an independent and sustainable means of transport. Much more can be done.

John George WILLIAMS
(Liberal Democrat)

The well being agencies are there to give advice and support - you make the environment safe and encourage healthy lifestyles through peer pressure. But the conventional methods of exercise may not be the answer in a very different world to that of even 10 years ago.

Lord Ian BROUGHALL
(The Official Monster Raving Loony Party)

The Monster Raving Loony Party believe that ALL bus routes should be cancelled immediately
Petrol Prices should be quadrupled and then doubled twice more..
Then the AFFLUENT would cycle
The POOR would walk.....

Diane Paula BIRNIE
(UK Independence Party)

While we do need to encourage people, especially children, to literally 'get out more' and enjoy exercise and physical pursuits we do need to recognise that it is nowhere near as safe in the 21st century as it used to be when I was young. We need to provide more safe, open spaces and ensure that both children parents can safely negotiate the city streets by cutting down on motor traffic and encouraging the use cycle tracks and pavements.

Richard GLOVER
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Martin John HALE
(UK Independence Party)

Thankfully there is no law that states what lifestyle someone should follow, we all know about obesity and sedentary lifestyles, however some people just don't care - it's their democratic choice. as frustrating as it is to the rest of us.
Having spent a lot of time in Ukraine and having a wife born and bred in Moscow, I know of air pollution, we should count our blessings for the air quality that we enjoy, I would never consider air quality an 'urgent' issue anywhere in this country

David KENDRICK
(UK Independence Party)

A big, tough question, and in truth, not one that is particularly party political. I drive a gas-powered car, because I think it is right thing to do. However, as a private citizen, I try to avoid sounding too smug about it, though I'm disappointed that it has not become a more 'fashionable' fuel. AFA children's care is concerned, I think the govt interferes too much, rather too little. There should be a presumption that the parents are right. I understand that some children may suffer more, but really the state should only intervene in the most extreme cases. A 'laisser-faire' upbinging style should be a legitimate option, rather than offending against whatever the current fashion is in child rearing.

Alan LAY
(UK Independence Party)

Absolutely, I have been a cyclist for 60 years, it keeps me fit, and at 76 I am 5 ft 9 ins. fit as a fiddle and weigh 11 stone.

Joe WEBSTER
(UK Independence Party)

That is rather too large and complex a question to admit of a short answer.

Nicholas David WILSON
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.