Elections

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Question 4 - we asked:

London’s Mayor has launched plans for proper prioritisation of space for cycling in London, with a 15-mile substantially-segregated route by removing traffic lanes from cars, three ‘mini-Hollands’ and more. Do you and your party support a new London-style bike plan for Cambridgeshire?

We asked this question in all 27 divisions, namely: Abbey, Arbury, Bar Hill, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, Cottenham, Histon and Impington, East Chesterton, Fulbourn, Gamlingay, Hardwick, King's Hedges, Market, Melbourn, Newnham, Norman Cross, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Roman Bank and Peckover, Romsey, Sawston, The Hemingfords and Fenstanton, Trumpington, Waterbeach, West Chesterton, Whittlesey North, Willingham.

79 of the 128 candidates (62%) who were asked this question responded as below.

Those candidate(s) which were elected are highlighted.

Tom WOODCOCK
(Cambridge Socialists)

I support many of the cycling measures introduced in London. However the journey toward making London a more integrated and cycle friendly transport city started before Boris Johnson. The congestion charge, which I am opposed too because if let those who have more money drive where they want, opened the way to giving cyclist more room on the road and encouraging a critical mass of cyclists. Further to this serious investment in bus infrastructure and oyster card technology, mostly by Ken Livingstone independent administration, has given people better public transport alternatives and taken more traffic off the roads.

There is a Long way to go in London and public transport is still too expensive. The bike scheme is a massive step forward but has still got a way to go for occasional uses to find it really accessible.

In Cambridge the county council need to stop letting stage coach do what the y want. Bus Routes are dictated by big business and major retailers and not in a integrated strategy. The city councils move to introduce the CBID plays further into the hands of the big companies and both councils need to take back decision making and start to plan and fight for investment in a regional transport strategy that stops the centres of our towns being gridlocked and takes traffic away from them and stops more journeys being started.

I am in favor of banning all private vehicles (other than residents and disabled badge holders) being stopped from entering the Cambridge inner ring road. Im also in favor of taking the buses back into public ownership and getting them to go when and where we need them!!

David Ian AMBROSE SMITH
(Conservative Party)

The Netherlands have a very civilized approach towards all road users and we would do well to copy some of their practices.

Andrew James BOWER
(Conservative Party)

I am delighted that Boris Johnson is doing this in London and am very pleased with the cycleway that the county council introduced along the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway route.

I would be interested in any comparable proposals.

Martin John CURTIS
(Conservative Party)

We are already drawing up strategic plans for Cambridgeshire. I think many of Boris' ideas for London are worthy of consideration for places like Cambridge and Ely and there are places where I would like to try mini-Hollands. But we have to remember that the County as a whole is very different to London and we need to look for different solutions for the rest of the County - but, without doubt we must be hugely ambitious for Cambridgeshire. One of the difficulties with this is that National cycling funding seems to be focussed on City and City Deal areas.

Timothy James HAIRE
(Conservative Party)

Personally I much prefer shared space; with roads decluttered, central lines removed etc. Which naturally brings down speeds and avoids conflicts, at the same time improving things for pedestrians. This will not work everywhere and on some commuter routes segragation is a good solution, if it is designed and implemented well.

John Michael IONIDES
(Conservative Party)

Cambridgeshire is such a varied area that attempting to lift a single model from London and apply it uniformly across the county does not seem wise to me. For instance, Cambridge is a massive outlier nationally in terms of cycling statistics. A solution that would be suitable in Cambridge would not necessarily work in Chatteris, and vice versa. I would prefer to look at the underlying issues and try to tailor solutions to individual locations.

Richard Graham JEFFS
(Conservative Party)

Any vision to improve safety is welcome but, given Cambridge's limited space, concern must be shown as to the impact of schemes on residents and local businesses. I support the idea of more segregated cycle lanes, perhaps with a second kerb, and more informative signage. A real problem is the sudden disappearance of cycle lanes dumping bikes in to traffic.

Sheila LAWLOR
(Conservative Party)

As someone who knows central London, I can be quite candid in saying that cycling still has a long way to go in the capital before it becomes as easy and natural as cycling in Cambridge. But Boris's plans are ambitious - especially for properly segregated cycle lanes. They would need care and perseverance if they are to be implemented properly and safely. It's no good having a cycle lane painted onto a road if buses and lorries ignore it, endangering cyclists in their own lane. In London I have noticed cycle lanes raised up to pavement level, which gives cyclists some protection from other vehicles. However, we don't need 'Barclays Bikes' here: people in Cambridge tend to own their own bikes, which is cheaper - and more environmentally friendly, since it removes the need to transport bikes by van to empty docking stations.

A city like Cambridge has its own special combination of circumstances-e.g. cycling is the main mode of transport for a significant proportion of us; busy, often narrow, central streets, some of which are unsuitable for heavier traffic; a failure of law enforcement when it comes to enforcing speed and weight limits for motor transport.

So a bike plan for Cambridge which I would support would need to take account of, and tackle, these and other special circumstances.

Tony ORGEE
(Conservative Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
James Andrew STRACHAN
(Conservative Party)

We already have a partial framework for cycling routes. We can do more.

Steve TIERNEY
(Conservative Party)

I do not speak "for my party" on this, but personally No. I do not support that.

Timothy John WOTHERSPOON
(Conservative Party)

Not sure what the party's view is but I certainly do.

Sandra BILLINGTON
(Green Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Eleanor Ruth CRANE
(Green Party)

I would certainly support a coherent strategy to encourage cycling in the county. Its specific details should fit the needs of Cambridgeshire and be agreed in consultation with local people and groups representing different groups of road users. Any such plan should consider not only built infrastructure (cycle lanes etc) but other things that people might need to help them cycle - ranging from salary sacrifice schemes for bicycle purchase and more bike shops to adult cycle training, cycle buddy schemes etc. Provision should also be made for maintenance of cycle lanes including gritting during icy weather.

Shaun Peter ESGATE
(Green Party)

I can't say that I know enough to comment.

Brett Mark HUGHES
(Green Party)

Look, every innovative strategy is always viewed with skepticism before it is introduced and often subsequently accepted as normal. Cambridge has much experience in accepting such change. County really needs to play to more of this capacity.

Stephen Roger LAWRENCE
(Green Party)

I do, and I believe my party does too

Megan PARRY
(Green Party)

I agree that greater segregation would improve safety, although maybe there are alternative schemes out there which are equally effective. Better infrastructure for cyclists would mean fewer cars on the road which would benefit everyone. Any cycle plan would have to be appropriate for Cambridge's specific needs.

Peter Harry POPE
(Green Party)

Yes.

Teal RILEY
(Green Party)

Definitely. If it possible in London, then it is possible in Cambridge. Berlin is also a great example where an ambitious plan to reduce dependancy on car use has been a triumph, with almost half of all journeys now made by bicycle within the city. And this was from a starting point of almost no cycling.

Simon David Francis SEDGWICK-JELL
(Green Party)

Yes

David SMITH
(Green Party)

There should be consultation with local people and groups, to arrive at a sensible plan which aims to encourage increased use of the cycle as a 'routine' method of transport. Such a plan should include incentives to leave the car at home and travel by cycle instead. A Cambridge-style bike plan would be great !

Helen STOCKS
(Green Party)

I would support a comprehensive and intergrated transport strategy where all road users are taken into account. However The space limitations within Cambridge may be an issue for a full 'mini-Holland'. We have pledged to make all roads in Cambridge 20mph in the next three years and would fully support a imaginative scheme which works for Cambridge.

Linda WHITEBREAD
(Green Party)

Sounds good, yes.

We would support a coherent strategy to encourage cycling in the county. Its specific details should fit the needs of Cambridgeshire and be agreed in consultation with local people and groups representing different types of road users. Any such plan should consider not only built infrastructure (cycle lanes etc) but other things that people might need to help them cycle - ranging from salary sacrifice schemes for bicycle purchase and more bike shops to adult cycle training, cycle buddy schemes etc. Also maintenance of cycle lanes including gritting during icy weather.

Does the Cycling Campaign support the introduction of 'Boris Bikes' as well - the free scheme introduced some years ago did not work, but it could be looked at again in the light of the London (and other) experience.

John HIPKIN
(Independent)

Yes

I don't belong to a party!

Ian TYES
(Independent)

London and Cambridge are substantially different in many respects, but what Cambridge needs is a joined up transport policy and if elected I would focus on this as my main area of interest. As an independent, i can have limited effect on many areas of county council responsibility where priorities are set nationally, but transport is one area where I hope to be able to make small but significant improvements. Without an overall integrated transport policy for the whole Cambridge sub-region, we end up with a series of disconnected bits of a network - the wonderful Milton and Chesterton cycle bridges have no obvious connection to each other. The busway cycle route ends at Milton Road and resumes at the railway station. It is daft!

John Frederick BERESFORD
(Labour & Co-operative)

I've seen how effective such a policy is in Holland, and given the nature of central Cambridge and the flatness of the countryside, I would support such a plan.

Clare BLAIR
(Labour Party)

Yes, we do. We share a similar geography and needs to many Dutch towns and there is a lot we could learn from them.

Edward CARLSSON BROWNE
(Labour Party)

I think the London plan is exciting and I’d be keen to see elements of it in Cambridgeshire, although due to the cost and London’s particular advantages (notably a level of public transport provision that is vastly superior to that found in Cambridge, let alone the shire) it probably wouldn’t be possible to adopt the scheme in toto.

Having said that, I don’t think we should be afraid to think big. Even if we aren’t able to implement every single bit of it, I do think we should have an ambitious cycling plan for Cambridgeshire which learns lessons from the continent. I’ve never cycled in the Netherlands, but I have cycled in Copenhagen and my experience there makes me very keen to look at measures that don’t just allow but also encourage bike use.

Sandra CRAWFORD
(Labour Party)

I and the Labour Party support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan. The Dutch infrastructure looks excellent, - it would be good to see it implemented in Cambridgeshire. It is known that good cycling infrastructure increases cycling, and encourages people who are nervous of busy roads to cycle. This could potentially reduce the number of cars on the road, especially for the school run.

Adam John DUTTON
(Labour Party)

I certainly support the ambition and Cambridgeshire's Labour party supports further investment in cycling. In practical terms - medieval towns and in some places even older country roads leave less space than we would hope for. I do not know enough about the budgets and road-space available in Cambridgeshire to fully understand where the compromise should be but I would hope it would be significantly further in that direction than we are.

Adrian John FRENCH
(Labour Party)

There are many excellent models of provision for safe cycling.I believe that Cambridge requires a solution consistent with the long tem development of local housing and the economy.

Huw JONES
(Labour Party)

Despite many years experience as a cyclist I do not feel safe on the county's 'A' roads and many of the 'B' roads are pretty scary too. I personally support Sustrans and support their approaches. Good quality routes are needed if the Cambridge cycling phenomenon is to take root in all of Cambridgeshire.

Noel KAVANAGH
(Labour Party)

I and the Labour Party fully support following the example of the cycle plan initiatives in Holland and would like to see similar radical schemes in Cambridgeshire.

Ben MONKS
(Labour Party)

Strategic development like this has to be planned in order to be sustainable, and can't simply solve one problem (such as better access for cycling) by shifting another (such as high levels of car traffic). As per our manifesto, Labour is committed to improving the extent of current high-quality cycling routes as well as looking to improve access and safety at pinchpoints such as busy road junctions. Any county-wide plan would need to be based on considering innovative ideas for cycling, but it would need to go hand in hand with better investment in the arterial roads routes (such as the A14) and in busy rural routes including village by-passes such as in the Willingham area.

Mike NETTLETON
(Labour Party)

Yes, as per question 2, but as part of in integrated 'transport' policy

Fiona ONASANYA
(Labour Party)

We support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan, including:-
learning from Dutch towns and country cycling and;
radical thinking, given similar needs (and flat topography) in Cambridgeshire.

Angela Mary PATRICK
(Labour Party)

Yes I do

Dan RATCLIFFE
(Labour Party)

I believe there should be a considered cycling plan for Cambridgeshire; this should incorporate lessons learnt from both Dutch and other successful national and international schemes. Even New York has shown it is possible to introduce successful cycling schemes and we should cast the net wide in a search for innovative solutions.

Paul SALES
(Labour Party)

I certainly support Improving cycling infrastructure but it needs to be a scheme to fit Cambridge’s unique environment.

Peter SARRIS
(Labour Party)

I support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan, learning in particular from Dutch towns and country cycling, given the topgraphical similarity (i.e. similar flatness) of Cambridgeshire and Holland. But I'd rather think of it as learning from the Dutch than learning from Boris!

Jocelynne SCUTT
(Labour Party)

The Dutch approach to cycling and provision for cyclists is spoken of by many as a positive approach that should inform developments cycling provision in the United Kingdom. This is particularly apposite to Cambridge because our topography is similar. Labour supports a new Cambridgeshire bike plan which incorporates learning from the Netherlands.

Martin SMART
(Labour Party)

We support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan, including learning from Dutch towns and country cycling and radical thinking, given similar needs and flat topography in Cambridgeshire.

Peter SNOW
(Labour Party)

We support a new Cambridgeshire bike plan, including learning from Dutch towns and country cycling and radical thinking, given similar needs and flat topography in Cambridgeshire.

Ashley WALSH
(Labour Party)

Yes. The Cambridgeshire Labour Party absolutely supports a new London-style bike plan for the county. We should be taking examples from Dutch towns and country cycling lanes, where relations between different groups of road users have been substantially improved by radical thinking and innovative road layouts.

Barbara Anne ASHWOOD
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes we do and have already got costed plans.

William James BARTER
(Liberal Democrat)

Broadly speaking, I agree here too, though obviously concrete proposals need to be examined - we need to see how plans fit in with existing road use, and make sure we set priorities in agreement with local communities.

Kilian BOURKE
(Liberal Democrat)

In principle, yes. However, I would like the Cycling Campaign flesh out these proposals, so that I can see more concretely what they would look like in practice. The one practical difficulty that occurs to me is that this might require the removal of bus priority measures, which would be a problem – we need to support sustainable transport more generally.

Belinda Margaret BROOKS-GORDON
(Liberal Democrat)

I do support a good bike-plan for Cambridge. I like the fact that some of the Colleges in my ward do a cycle/borrow system. In our County Election Manifesto we lay out an exciting vision of what Cambridge could be like for cyclists. It includes the Chisholm Trail, better cycle links Cambridgeshire-wide, improving junctions (I note that the University has no plans to improve the junction on Huntingdon Road with the building of the NWSite - this is not really good enough), lowering car speeds, better winter gritting of routes, as well as investment in cycling.

Christopher John BROWN
(Liberal Democrat)

Being a regular visitor to London I have seen the very difficult conditions and risks cyclists often face in the capital and support any action there to reduce deaths and injuries to cyclists. For Cambridgeshire I am certain that there are some elements of these plans that would benefit the county, especially junction improvement in Cambridge, further segregation and developing and signing quiet routes.

Edward CEARNS
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes,I support it in principle but consideration also needs to be given to alternative public transport needs and Cambridge's infrastructure is so restricted that it would be hard to do this in places without removing dedicated bus lanes etc. The Chisholm Trail in our budget would be a very good step towards this.

The County Council needs to be far more ambitious in lobbying central government for more funding for transformational investment in cycling. The Lib Dems City run council is currently in the bid process for a City Deal which amongst other projects it is hoped will include significant provision for cycling as part of a network of sustainable transport for Cambridge.

Keith EDKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

Cambridgeshire may be more suited to a series of town-region plans rather than an overall grand plan. Liberal Democrat budget amendments provided funds to upgrade off-road paths to provide cycling routes into major centres of employment, and across villages to key rural rail stations.

Peter Robert FANE
(Liberal Democrat)

Rural Cambridgeshire has very different issues to London, but we have much to learn from experience in Netherlands, Denmark and elsewhere in continental Europe. In particular, as a member of the Lib Dem group on Cambridgeshire County Council, I would support the Netherlands model, see for instance your ‘Go Dutch’ in London campaign - http://www.camcycle.org.uk/newsletters/107/article12.html. This it is rooted in tried and tested practice in Holland and Denmark which are considered exemplar in terms of cycling infrastructure, and where cycling is so much safer than it is here.

David Aubertin GRACE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, our manifesto sets out plans to make it much easier to get around by bicycle, including:
• Building the Chisholm Trail, a strategic cycle route from Addenbrooke’s to the Cambridge Science Park, alongside the railway;
• Investing in enhanced cycle links around the county;
• Making dangerous junctions for cyclists much safer;
• Providing more cycle parking;
• Introducing 20mph zones in residential areas, (not including A and B roads) in consultation with local communities;
• Gritting more of our busiest cycle routes.
Our alternative budget for the county would provide £8m investment in cycling, so these plans aren't just an empty aspiration but an achievable policy. Sadly the Labour group leader has opposed this spending specifically while the Conservative administration in Shire Hall has cut all environmental funding, amongst other things.

Sue GYMER
(Liberal Democrat)

LD nationally are very supportive of cycling and Julian in the city is an advocate for 2 wheeled transport. At CCC the LD group has repeatedly put cycling on the agenda, giving ideas like the Chisholm trail, and demanding routes to be gritted; we will continue to do so led by Susan Van Der Ven.

John David JENKINS
(Liberal Democrat)

Sounds like a good idea

Michael Thomas KILPATRICK
(Liberal Democrat)

I believe in greater pedestrianisation of city centres where possible, and this should be accompanied by appropriate cycle routes too. For most of Cambridgeshire, however, this is of little relevance. Inter-village and intra-village cycle routes should be enhanced, linking transport hubs, local retail areas and places of employment.

Sebastian Gerald Molesworth KINDERSLEY
(Liberal Democrat)

I think I support it for Cambridge and a generous extent of the necklace villages because I think it is only there that the investment will deliver best value for money. I also would highlight the issue of making Cambridge difficult to access or use as a service centre for residents from outside who rely on it for their core needs - health education and so on - bearing in mind that most villages have extremely poor public transport and often extremely dangerous roads to use as a cyclist. But if the right amount of funding could be obtained it would make for an extremely exciting project.

Maurice Leonard LEEKE
(Liberal Democrat)

I support better cycling facilities, including the provision of segregated facilities (acknowledging that cyclists may choose to cycle on road - as they are entitled to do).

Daniel Stephen LEVY
(Liberal Democrat)

While we support a greater provision of cycle routes and facilities, but while we would like to see things such as dangerous routes being brought up to a safe standard, a London-style scheme would require us having lots of relatively wide roads running throughout area, including in the city centre. It may also be difficult to construct such roads in outlying areas, as the effect of doing this on the local environment would need to be considered. Cambridgeshire needs a scheme designed to fit it, rather than large cities such as London or Amsterdam.

Ian Geoffrey MANNING
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. In Cambridge it isn't always physically possible to reproduce this though, but preference should be given to sustainable transport in that case.

Robert MCLAREN
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes , as long as you do it in,Wisbech ,and all the other fenland towns.

Lucy Kathleen NETHSINGHA
(Liberal Democrat)

I think it sounds a very interesting idea. The details would be very important.

Andy PELLEW
(Liberal Democrat)

I support the development of a plan based on the ideas in London but refined to suit Cambridge.

Barry John PLATT
(Liberal Democrat)

While the needs of Cambridgeshire are very different to those in London, I would support provision of substantially improved facilities along the lines of those suggested there, in consultation with the local users. Substantial segregation is a good idea in principle, but may be practically difficult in places, and I feel it is important to emphasise that such facilities are an addition to – rather than a substitute for – the main roadways.

David John PRIESTMAN
(Liberal Democrat)

I don't think Cambridge City, nor our predominantly rural shire, should look to the metropolis for better solutions. Pedestrian issues and safer cycling should continue to be jointly-prioritised locally.

Amanda Joan TAYLOR
(Liberal Democrat)

An unanticipated spin-off from the Guided Busway has been the bridleway that runs alongside it. As well as providing a pedestrian walkway away from traffic, it provides an excellent segregated route for cyclists, and I would love to see more. However, it must be recognized that many cycle journeys may need to be on public roads as well, as cycle routes will not always be able to get everyone where they wish to go.

Neale UPSTONE
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes. I think we need better transport alternatives to make it as obvious, but if we're bold, we'll paint a clear vision of why we need ... to be bold!

Susan Elizabeth Kerr VAN DE VEN
(Liberal Democrat)

Yes, my party and I support this approach. From my experience of cycling in Holland, it makes sense to take the Go Dutch approach for all the reasons listed. What I notice most about cycling in Holland is the relaxed cycling posture, and the nearly complete absence of helmets, because people feel safe and confident. There is simply an absence of conflict. My Dutch relatives won't let their children cycle when they visit us here because of the mixing of cars and cycles on the road.

John George WILLIAMS
(Liberal Democrat)

I think, certainly an adapted version for urban situations in our towns such as Cambridge, Ely, March, Wisbech etc., but you can't simply transpose this scheme to trans urban and rural situations.

Lord Ian BROUGHALL
(The Official Monster Raving Loony Party)

The Monster Raving Loony Party believe that Cambridge has an admirable history
Therefore - a "CAMBRIDGE Style" cycling plan should be INVENTED and NOT copied...
Cambridge has "Best in Class" Colleges and Businesses - so why not inspire THEM ?

Diane Paula BIRNIE
(UK Independence Party)

A good idea from Boris, this time! I would personally support a similar idea in Cambridge.

Peter BURKINSHAW
(UK Independence Party)

No. This proposal amounts to theft from the people who pay to use roads and the benefit given to those who don't.

Richard GLOVER
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.
Martin John HALE
(UK Independence Party)

UKIP candidates are 'Independent', there is no party 'whip', we are a group of free independent thinkers, therefore all opinions in this survey are solely mine:
It would be nice to see this system, I regularly use a similar one in France. What concerns me is that I already see many cyclist not using cycle lanes and cycling alongside in the road. I would advocate that all cycles be registered for a small fee and then covered by a low cost insurance, from this funding it could part help towards the implementation of such schemes.

David KENDRICK
(UK Independence Party)

UKIP's general position on govt spending is to concentrate on areas where each £ of public money spent has to be of as much value as possible, both financially, and in Q of L terms. UKIP is keen on spending on upgrades to the A14, and improving the speed and quality of the repair of pot-holes, because both impact on the the Q of L of large numbers of people. In my locality, I am pleased to support the initative to improve the safety of cycling into Cambridge along the A10. As far as a 'bike plan for Cambridgeshire' is concerned, I am undecided as to whether it is better to do that, as opposed to concentrating resources where they are needed most. I'm lukewarm torwards any proposal where there is an element of 'for the sake of completeness, we should...'. I prefer to start from, 'we desperately need....'.

Alan LAY
(UK Independence Party)

It does seem a good idea, but costings must be considered.

Joe WEBSTER
(UK Independence Party)

We do not, as far as I am aware, have a party policy on this matter. UKIP councillors are expected to try to discover and to represent the views of their electors. If elected, that is what I would do.

Nicholas David WILSON
(UK Independence Party)
The candidate did not enter a response for this question.

Camcycle is a non-partisan body. All candidates are given an equal opportunity to submit their views. Information published by Camcycle (Cambridge Cycling Campaign), The Bike Depot, 140 Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0DL.